Panhandle Agriculture

Friday Feature: Protecting Hay Quality at Harvest

Friday Feature:  Protecting Hay Quality at Harvest

Massey Ferguson and Dr. Dennis Hancock, UGA Forage Extension Specialist have teamed up to produce a video series called “A Cut Above the Rest” with tips on how to harvest high quality hay.  In the first video Dr. Hancock explains RFQ (Relative Forage Quality) scores being used to evaluate the quality of hay of various types.  Both videos explain how cutting height, cutting speed, crop conditioning, tedding, and raking impact forage quality of hay at harvest time.  Check out these short videos that provide great tips for hay producers who are striving to harvest optimal quality forage for hay or baleage production.

Part 1 – Hay Cutting

 

Part 2 – Raking and Tedding

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If you enjoyed these videos, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

 

 

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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/10/07/friday-feature-protecting-hay-quality-at-harvest/

Florida EQIP Application Deadline is November 17

Florida EQIP Application Deadline is November 17

EQIP can provide cost-share funds for conservation practices such cross fencing, and a water trough system to allow for rotational grazing and protection of riparian areas.

Florida farmers, ranchers and forest owners can apply until November 17, 2017 for fiscal year 2018 funding from the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) that provides financial and technical assistance through USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Although applications are accepted on a continuous basis for all programs, funding selections are typically made once a year.  The following video explains the types of services and cost-share programs the NRCS provides to farmers and ranchers, and the basic information needed to apply for EQIP funding.

Through EQIP, agricultural landowners may receive financial and technical assistance to improve soil, water, air, plants, animals, and related resources. Eligible land includes cropland, rangeland, pastureland, private non-industrial forestland and other farm or ranch lands. The application deadline also applies to the following EQIP-funded initiatives:

Begin by visiting your local NRCS field office and requesting help developing a conservation plan. To learn about technical and financial assistance available from NRCS, go to Getting Started with NRCS.

 

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Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/10/06/florida-eqip-application-deadline-is-november-17/

September Weather Summary, Hurricane Nate and the Last Quarter Outlook

September Weather Summary, Hurricane Nate and the Last Quarter Outlook

National Weather Service summary of rainfall estimates across the Florida Panhandle in September 2017.

September was an unusually dry month across much of the Panhandle, considering we were all watching Tropical Storm Irma so closely.  You can see the red streaks where the outer-bands of Irma swung around on the eastern part of the region.  Leon, Liberty, Gadsden, Jackson, and Holmes Counties did get a boost from Tropical Storm Irma rainfall bands( red 5-10″), but most of the region was well below average for the month of September.  Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties were much drier than normal,  with some areas receiving less than 2″ (green) in September.

Rainfall measured in September 2017 at the six FAWN stations in the Florida Panhandle.

All six of the Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN) stations in the Panhandle recorded below historic average rainfalls for September 2017 (-0.5″ to -4.7″).  Jay was the driest location with only 0.8″ for the month, while 3.8″ was the highest total recorded in Marianna.  For the entire year however, the Jay station still has the highest total of 53″, while only 37″ of rainfall has been recorded in Monticello in 2017.  Through September, Monticello is 10.6″ below average thus far in 2017.

Temperatures did cool off a little in September.  The average air temperature dropped from 80° in August to 76° in September.  The average soil temperature dropped 5° from 88° in August to 83° in September.  The high temperature for the month was 94° on September 28 & 29.  The low was 60° on September 10, 11, & 12.  For a complete summary of daily temperatures and rainfall, download:  2017 Jan-Sept Weather Summary.  

Short Term Outlook for Hurricane/ Tropical Storm Nate

The major weather news this week is Hurricane Nate.  This was one of those storms that just seemed to pop up, rather than a long track streaming across the ocean.  Early preliminary forecasts placed the center of the storm track right through the heart of the Panhandle.  The current Forecast track is further west, but the western Panhandle Counties may well have some impact from this storm.

Nate is expected to be a much weaker storm than Irma was, but there will be significant rainfall right at the peak of peanut and cotton harvest.  Most of the state of Alabama will certainly be affected, as well as the western Panhandle Counties in Florida.  Farmers in Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, and Escambia Counties can expect 2-4″ in the next 72 hours.

Wind may also be an issue, especially in western most counties of Florida. There is a pretty high probability of at least 40 mph wind gust across Escambia, Santa Rosa, and Okaloosa Counties.   Between the wind and rain, there are going to be cotton fields damaged that have yet to be harvested across the cotton belt.  For preparation tips for your farm review: Hurricane Preparation for Your Farm

Last Quarter Weather Outlook

The seasonal forecast for the last quarter of the year has changed considerably since last month.  The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) has officially issued a La Niña Watch, which would  mean warmer and drier than normal weather for the Southeastern states.

Over the last month, equatorial sea surface temperatures were near-to-below average across the central and eastern Pacific Ocean.  The most recent predictions from the NCEP Climate Forecast System indicate the formation of La Niña as soon as the Northern Hemisphere fall 2017.  Forecasters favor these predictions in part because of the recent cooling of surface and sub-surface temperature anomalies, and also because of the higher degree of forecast skill at this time of year. In summary, there is an increasing chance (~55-60%) of La Niña during the Northern Hemisphere fall and winter 2017-18.  Climate Prediction Center

The CPC’s graphic 3-month outlook above reflects their changes in expectations from a coming La Niña .  This latest forecast may also mean another mild winter, which is not good for reducing insect population such as white flies, thrips and other key crop pests.

The AgroClimate fact sheet,  Impacts on Agriculture of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the Southeastern U.S., provides some guidance on how the two ENSO phases ( El Niño/La Niña) affect crops of different types.  For irrigated winter vegetables, the warmer and drier weather can be positive with less cold damage and less fungal disease pressure.  For cool-season forages this may not be a good year to invest in overseeding of perennial pastures, and instead focus on open land behind annuals crops with less competition for moisture.  Depending on how strong the La Niña influence is and how long it persists, dry conditions could delay planting of early spring dryland crops such as corn, melons, and annual warm season forages.

 

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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/10/06/september-weather-summary-hurricane-nate-and-the-last-quarter-outlook/

Farmers Invited to View On-farm Cotton Test – October 10

Farmers Invited to View On-farm Cotton Test – October 10

 

Farmers are invited to view the 15 cotton variety test at Bishop Farms. Photo – Doug Mayo

Variety selection can play a large role in the management strategy of a crop, as well its yield potential. This year in Jackson County, UF/IFAS Extension collaborated with Bishop Farms for an on-farm trial.

Fifteen cotton varieties were planted side by side to monitor season long performance and yield comparisons at harvest. The trial was defoliated on October 1st, and the morning of Tuesday October 10th growers are encouraged to visit the trial and see the varieties in person. Extension Agronomists David Wright, Ian Small, and Regional Crop IPM Agent Ethan Carter will be in the field from 10-11:30am (CST) and available to discuss the varieties and crop performance with those who stop by with questions as they view the different varieties. Plot maps will be provided and each variety will be marked with signs.

The field is located at the intersection of Sweet Pond and Paramore Road, the address is 6701 Paramore Rd, Sneads, FL 32460. Please contact Ethan at the Jackson County Extension Office (850-482-9620) for any questions, or 352-221-0580 the morning of the tour, if you have trouble finding the location of the tour.

 

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Author: Ethan Carter – ethancarter@ufl.edu

Ethan Carter is the Regional Row Crop IPM Agent in Jackson County. He earned his BS in Food and Resource Economics, and his MS in Agronomy, both from the University of Florida.

Ethan Carter

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/10/06/farmers-invited-to-view-on-farm-cotton-test-october-10/

Managing Grazing Land to Enhance Bee Habitat

Managing Grazing Land to Enhance Bee Habitat

Jose Dubeux and Liza Garcia, University of Florida – North Florida Research and Education Center

Figure 1. Honeybee on white clover at UF-IFAS Citra. Photo credit: Jose Dubeux

Improved forages are not only good for livestock, but they can also help feed bees! Managing grasslands to enhance bee habitat requires similar management practices to those needed to enhance pasture for grazing livestock. Diversification of pasture species, management to increase the flowering period, and proper grazing management (no overgrazing) are key practices to enhance habitat for bees (Figure 1), and other native insects that also provide plant pollination. These practices are also important to improve livestock performance and sustainability of grasslands.

Bees are the primary pollinators and they benefit 1/3 of the world’s crop-based production. Bee populations are declining, affecting plants that rely upon them. Reasons for bee decline are diverse, and include land-use change leading to loss and fragmentation of habitats, agriculture intensification, pesticide application and environmental pollution, decreased resource diversity, alien species, the spread of pathogens, and climate change.

Both livestock and bees benefits from forage legumes. Cattle perform better on grass-legume mixtures compared to grass monocultures, because of the greater digestibility and crude protein found in legumes when compared to grasses. Legumes also add nitrogen to pastures via biological N2-fixation (BNF), enhancing forage productivity, and ultimately, stocking rate and gain per area. Bees benefit from legumes because of the flowers they feed on (Figures 2 and 3). Bees do benefit from grass flowering as well, however, diversifying the forage species also improves bee diet, providing opportunities for selection and improved nutrition.

Figure 2. Bumblebee on Crimson clover at UF-IFAS NFREC in Marianna. Photo credit: Jose Dubeux

Figure 3. Bumblebee grazing on crimson and white clovers at UF-IFAS NFREC in Marianna. Photo credit: Liza Garcia.

At the UF-IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center in Marianna, researchers are assessing the bee population on grass monocultures and grass-legume mixtures, under grazing conditions. For the grass-legume system, they are evaluating a bahiagrass-perennial peanut mixture during the warm-season, overseeded with rye, oats, and a blend of crimson, red, and ball clovers in the cool-season. The grass monoculture system they are comparing is bahiagrass during the warm-season, overseeded with rye and oats during the cool-season.  Over the last two years, they have been putting out traps for 24 hours and collecting bees every 28 days in these contrasting grazing systems (grass vs. grass-legume pastures). Thirteen bee species were already identified, including 11 native bee species. Native bees are extremely important, since they are generally better pollinators than honeybees. Wild native bees are mostly pollen collectors and help pollinate many of our agricultural crops, maintain productivity, and plant diversity. Adding forage legumes increased the flower density (flower number per unit area). As a result, some of the bee species occurred more frequently in the grass-legume system as compared to the grass monocultures (Figure 4).

Figure 4. Number of Melissodes communis per trap in grazed paddocks of grass monoculture and grass-legume mixtures.

Figure 5. Honeybee on perennial peanut flower. Photo Credit: Jose Dubeux.

Take home message

Bees and livestock might have more in common than you think! They both need a diverse forage diet, so adding forage legumes to the pasture benefits bees and livestock. Adding forage legumes extends the flowering period benefiting native bees. Legumes enhance cattle performance because of greater nutritive value. Enhancing bee habitat will also have a positive cascade effect on crop pollination over the long-term, enhancing crop productivity as a result. This win-win situation also benefits the environment. Cool-season forage crop planting time is here, so this is a good opportunity to integrate clovers into your grazing system.  Perennial Peanut is the most productive warm-season perennial legume for Florida.  Researchers at UF/IFAS are developing techniques to integrate perennial peanut into bahigrass pastures as well.  The investment to add legumes into your grazing operation is worth making just for the improved animal performance, but it will also enhance the habitat for pollinators that are so important for the environment and our food systems.

 

More information related to this topic:

2017 Cool-Season Forage Variety Recommendations for Florida

Winter Forage Legume Guide

Rhizoma Perennial Peanut

Bee Pastures Supplement Hive Nutrition and Enhance Honey Production

Improving, Restoring, and Managing Natural Resources on Rural Properties in Florida: Sources of Financial Assistance

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Author: dubeux – dubeux@ufl.edu

dubeux

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/10/06/managing-grazing-land-to-enhance-bee-habitat/

Proper Hay Storage Can Save You Money

Proper Hay Storage Can Save You Money

Evan Anderson, Walton County Agriculture Agent

If you grow or purchase hay to feed livestock, you probably know that not all hay is created equal. There are a number of factors that contribute to the quality of the bale you end up with. If you’re relying on hay to provide your animals with the nutrition they need, it pays to take care when managing your hay pastures or deciding which hay to purchase.

First, the type of forage plays a role. Different crops have different average levels of crude protein and total digestible nutrients; in general, legumes and cool-season grasses are often higher quality than warm-season grasses. The way forage crops are treated while growing makes a difference, too. Fertilize your forage properly while it’s growing, and what you add will translate to more available nutrients for your livestock. Next, hay should be cut at the proper time. Let the forage grow too long, and it becomes tough, full of lignin and stems. This not only reduces the quality of the hay, but also makes it less palatable.

To determine the quality of your hay once it’s made, get it tested. A forage testing lab can tell you exactly what’s in your final product, ensuring that you are able to tailor your feeding program to give your livestock the right nutrition.

All this might seem like a lot, but it’s just the beginning. A surprising amount of quality can be lost, from even the best hay, after it has been cut and baled. Proper storage has a huge impact on not only the quality of the hay, but eventually on the health of your livestock and from there, on your wallet.

Important!

You can lose up to a 50% of the nutrients from improperly storing hay!

What does proper hay storage look like? Start by making or buying well-made bales that are dense, so they can shed water and reduce weathering losses. A loose bale lets water and air in, which leeches out nutrients. In a 5 foot diameter bale, the outer 4 inches accounts for 25% of the bale. If only that outer layer becomes weathered, you’ve lost up to one-quarter of the money you spent.

To help avoid this, wrap or cover the bales. Yes, bales that are high in moisture may need to dry in the sun for a day or two. Moisture levels above 20% are dangerous; mold can grow in damp bales, which can lead to sick animals or even spontaneous combustion of the bale. Once they’ve dried, however, they should be moved to shelter as soon as possible. A roof overhead is best, so a good pole barn will pay for itself eventually. If that’s not an option, try covering the bales with a tarp or plastic. Keep them off the ground if possible, on racks, tires, gravel, or at least on well-drained soil.  Treat your hay well, and the extra work and investment will pay off in the long run!

 

For more information, contact your local Extension office, or use the following links to fact sheets related to this subject:

Minimizing Losses in Hay Storage and Feeding

Round Bale Hay Storage

Factors Affecting Forage Quality

Implications of Round Bale Dimensions on Hay Use

Harvesting, Storing, and Feeding Forages as Round Bale Silage

Forage Testing

 

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Author: eanderson350 – eanderson350@ufl.edu

eanderson350

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/10/06/proper-hay-storage-can-save-you-money/

September Florida Cattle Market Price Watch

September Florida Cattle Market Price Watch

The August 2018 Feeder Cattle futures contract increased by $ 5.95/cwt. during September. Based on this futures price increase, August Feeder Cattle revenues increased by approximately $ 47.60/head ($ 5.95/cwt. * 8.0 cwt.) on an 800-pound feeder steer, which amounts to $ 2,975.00/truckload (50,000 lbs.). The August Feeder Cattle futures contract high, contract low, and price range since September 2017 are $ 150.02, $ 139.80, and $ 10.22/cwt., respectively. The price range of $ 10.22/cwt. on an 800-pound feeder steer totals $ 81.76/head and $ 5,110.00/truckload.

  1. The breakeven price was estimated to be $ 714.13/head or $ 129.84/cwt. ($ 714.13/head divided by 5.50 cwt.). The breakeven price includes variable and fixed production costs of $ 419/head and $ 295/head, respectively.
  2. The price objective was estimated to be $ 864.36/head or $ 157.16/cwt. ($ 864.36/head divided by 5.50 cwt.).  The price objective includes production costs of $ 714/head, family living withdrawal ($ 100/head), and growth
    capital/retirement ($ 50/head).
  3. The expected cash price is equal to the daily August 2018 Feeder Cattle futures closing price plus an expected August 2018 South Florida 550 lb. Feeder Calf Basis of $ 2/cwt.

 

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Author: Chris Prevatt – prevacg@ufl.edu

Chris Prevatt

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/10/06/september-florida-cattle-market-price-watch-2/

Friday Feature: A Tribute to Bud Adams – One of Florida’s Greatest Cowmen

Friday Feature:  A Tribute to Bud Adams – One of Florida’s Greatest Cowmen

Florida has lost one of the all-time great cowmen and conservationists! Alto “Bud” Adams, Jr., passed away at the age of 91, on September 22, 2017, at his home on Adams Ranch near Ft. Pierce, Florida.  Bud Adams and his family have owned and managed the 50,000-acre, Adams Ranch since 1937. Adams Ranch is the 15th largest Cow-calf Operation in the US, managing a 10,000 head, brood cow herd.  Not only was Bud a cattlemen of great vision, but he was also nationally recognized for his efforts in land, water, and wildlife conservation.

As a tribute to Bud Adams, it seemed only fitting to share three videos that were produced to share the story of this historic Florida cattle family.

The first video was shared on an episode of America’s Heartland that was produced in 2011.

The next video was produced when Bud Adams was inducted into the Florida Agriculture Hall of Fame in 1999:

The third video was an episode of  The Ride with Cord McCoy that showcased the Adams Ranch with interesting interviews with Bud Adams and other ranch employees that was aired on RFD-TV on July 7, 2014 :

 

The following obituary was provided on the Adams Ranch website:

Bud Adams was born in Ft. Pierce April 4, 1926. For the next 91 years he lived a life everyone could envy, but only a few could handle. A Christian man, he taught his family and friends by example. He always had a firm handshake, and his word was his bond. His love for the outdoors, especially the Florida prairies and woodlands, were evident in not only his holistic approach to land management, but also his talent for photography. Mr. Bud could find God’s beauty in plants, animals and people, and was able to capture these images on film for the rest of us to enjoy. We are all grateful for his generosity and grace.

Bud traveled to Tallahassee and attended Leon High School while his father served on the Florida Supreme Court. At 18, he joined the US Navy at the end of WWII, and was part of our greatest generation. He graduated from the University of Florida. While a career in law or politics could have been in his future, Bud chose the life of a cowboy. He had fond memories of working alongside many of the founding families of modern day Florida, as well as of the many Seminole Indians he befriended as a young man in the days before fences. His father Judge Alto Adams made him a partner in the ranch in 1937 and Bud has run the ranch since 1948.

Bud was a proud member of the Florida Cattlemen’s Association, serving as President in 1958. For the last 59 years he had been a fixture at most every gathering of past-FCA Presidents, always offering kind advice to upcoming FCA leadership.

There are many things Bud was responsible for that will be around for generations to come. One is the Braford breed of cattle. Adams Ranch in Ft. Pierce is home to the foundation herd of this hearty breed. 5/8 Hereford and 3/8 Brahman, these red cattle quickly showed tolerance to Florida’s tropical climate, and flourished in the heat and rain. Mr. Bud was proud to say that if you bought one of his bred cattle, she would take care of the calf with no help needed from anyone. He was a founding member of the United Braford Breeders Association, located in Tyler, Texas.

Another monument to Bud’s life in agriculture is the land he bought, developed, managed and cared for. He was a pioneering advocate of conserving and protecting this land for future generations. His efforts and leadership have been awarded nationally. More importantly, when other landowners saw Bud endorsing and leading these conservation efforts, they were drawn to do the same through his trustworthy and honorable reputation. Bud has written three books describing his career as a rancher and steward of Florida lands.

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If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

 

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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/30/friday-feature-a-tribute-to-bud-adams-one-of-floridas-greatest-cowmen/

The “Positive Associative Effect” of High Protein Supplements

The “Positive Associative Effect” of High Protein Supplements

Hay and baleage stored for winter feeding at the UF/IFAS NFREC Beef Unit near Marianna. Photo: Nicolas DiLorenzo

Glenn Selk, Oklahoma State University Emeritus Extension Animal Scientist

As you drive around this fall you see many big round bales of hay stored for winter feed.  The quality of this hay will vary a great deal.  Frankly, some of it will be low in protein content and therefore low in digestibility.  The microorganisms in the rumen of beef cows and replacement heifers require readily available protein to multiply and exist in large enough quantities to digest the cellulose in low quality roughages.  Protein supplementation of low-quality, low protein forages results in a “positive associative effect.” This “positive associative effect” occurs as supplemental protein available to the “bugs” in the rumen allows them to grow, multiply, and digest the forage more completely and more rapidly.  Therefore the cow gets more out of the hay she consumes, she digests it more quickly and is ready to eat more hay in a shorter period of time.  Data from Oklahoma State University illustrates this (Table 1). The prairie hay used in this study was less than 5% crude protein. When the ration was supplemented daily with 1.75 lbs of cottonseed meal (41% crude protein), retention time of the forage was reduced 32% which resulted in an increase in feed intake of 27%. Because hay intake was increased, the animal had a better chance of meeting both the protein and energy requirement without supplementing other feeds. Because retention time was decreased, one could postulate the protein supplementation in this situation also increased digestibility of the hay.

As producers prepare their winter supplement strategies, they can see the importance of providing enough protein in the diet of the cows to feed the “bugs” in the rumen.  If the hay is low in protein (less than 8 % crude protein), a small amount of supplemental protein such as cottonseed meal, soybean meal, or one of the higher protein by-product feeds, could increase the amount and digestibility of the hay being fed.

This strategy requires that ample forage is available to take advantage of the “positive associative effect.”  As the table above illustrates, properly supplemented cows, or replacement heifers, will voluntarily consume about 27% more hay, if they were provided adequate protein.  As long as enough forage is available, this is the positive effect of a small amount of protein supplementation.

 

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Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/30/the-positive-associative-effect-of-high-protein-supplements/

October Cattle & Forage Management Reminders

October Cattle & Forage Management Reminders

UF/IFAS Beef Cattle & Forage Specialists, and County Extension Agents serving the Florida Panhandle worked to develop a basic management calendar for cattle producers.  The purpose of this calendar is to provide reminders for management techniques with similar timing to those used at the North Florida Research and Education Center’s Beef Unit, near Marianna, Florida.  Links to useful publications with more information are also provided.

Just like soil sampling before purchasing fertilizer, hay should be sampled and sent to a lab for evaluation before purchasing supplemental feeds. Don’t guess, forage test! Credit: Doug Mayo

October Management Reminders

October is a very busy month on cattle operations ranging from heifer vaccinations to hay harvest and winter forage planting.  With so much to do, it is a good idea to review this list of management reminders to develop your own “To-Do” list.  Make sure you reserve at least one day to go to Moultire for the Sunbelt Ag Expo!

Cattle Herd Management

  • Pre-breeding Cow & Heifer Vaccination (1 Month prior to breeding)
  • Feed weaned heifers limited supplement
  • Inventory hay and purchase additional bales as necessary (2 tons/cow)
    • Forage test hay to determine supplement needs
    • Evaluate and repair hay feeding equipment and replace as needed
      • Hay rings, spears, trailers
    • Move yearling heifers to clean, dry calving pasture & record body condition
    • Put together calving emergency kit
  • Increase supplementation to weaned replacement heifers and start feeding hay

Pasture Management

  • If considering alfalfa as a monoculture, adjust pH near 7.0 and use a prepared seedbed

Pest Management

  • Scout pastures for poisonous weeds, spray, mow, or remove if found
  • Use nonselective herbicide on pastures that are due for renovation.  Especially for heavy infestations of grass weeds such as centipede or common Bermudagrass.

 Annual Educational Events

Attend Sunbelt Ag Expo October 17-19  (Stop by the UF/IFAS Barn)

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Pan Ag logo finalUse the following link to download the entire Cattle & Forage Management Annual Calendar:

Panhandle Ag Extension Team Cattle & Forage Management Calendar

Developed by the Panhandle Agriculture Extension Livestock and Forage Team:

Doug Mayo, Cliff Lamb, Mark Mauldin, Ann Blount, Cheryl Mackowiak, Jose Dubeux, Jay Ferrell, Jennifer Bearden, NicolasDiLorenzo, Shep Eubanks, Jed Dillard, Mike Goodchild, Roy Carter, Henry Grant, John Atkins, Kalyn Waters, and Ray Bodrey.
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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/30/october-cattle-forage-management-reminders-2/

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