Panhandle Agriculture

January Cattle and Forage Management Reminders

January Cattle and Forage Management Reminders

UF/IFAS Beef Cattle & Forage Specialists, and County Extension Agents serving the Florida Panhandle developed a basic management calendar for cattle producers in the region.  The purpose of this calendar is to provide reminders for management techniques with similar timing to those used at the North Florida Research and Education Center’s Beef Unit, near Marianna, Florida.  Links to useful publications with more information are also provided.

Colostrum consumption is a key factor in the long-term health of newborn calves. This calf needs to get up and nurse several times within the first four hours after birth to ensure adequate consumption. (Alachua, Florida)

JANUARY

Cattle Herd Management

Pasture Management

  • Begin grazing winter forage at 10-12 inch canopy height and remove cattle when forage canopy is 4 inches.
    • If possible, limit-graze for 2-3 hours per day, plus free choice hay to acclimate cattle and stretch grazing days
    • After initial grazing, top-dress with 40-50 lbs. N per acre

Pest Management

 Annual Events

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Pan Ag logo finalUse the following link to download the entire Cattle & Forage Management Annual Calendar:

Panhandle Ag Extension Team Cattle & Forage Management Calendar

 

Developed by the Panhandle Agriculture Extension Livestock and Forage Team:

Doug Mayo, Cliff Lamb, Mark Mauldin, Ann Blount, Cheryl Mackowiak, Jose Dubeux, Jay Ferrell, Jennifer Bearden, Nicolas DiLorenzo, Shep Eubanks, Jed Dillard, Mike Goodchild, Roy Carter, Henry Grant, John Atkins, and Kalyn Waters
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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/07/january-cattle-and-forage-management-reminders/

Panhandle Hay Production Conference and Trade Show – January 25

Panhandle Hay Production Conference and Trade Show – January 25

Regardless of weather conditions, the ability to supply ample and nutritious forage is critical for livestock production.  Learn more about this topic at the Hay Production Conference and Trade Show on Wednesday, January 25, 2017, at the Holmes County Ag Center, 1169 E Hwy 90, Bonifay FL.  Presentation topics will include: Fertility and Relative Forage Quality (RFQ), Decision Making for Variety Selection, Pest and Weed Management, Marketing Your Hay and Production Cost, and Understanding Weather Forecasting. Use the following link for the flyer with more details: 

Panhandle Hay Conference 2017

Agenda

  • 7:30 Registration
  • 8:00 Speakers
  • 10:30 Trade-show Break
  • 11:00 Speakers
  • 12:00 Lunch is Served
  • 2:00 Trade Show Closes

The $ 10.00/person registration fee includes lunch and proceedings.

For More Information Contact and to pre-register, please contact:
UF/IFAS Extension Holmes Co. Extension Office
Kalyn Waters, County Extension Director
Phone: 850-547-1108
Email: kalyn.waters@ufl.edu

 

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Author: Kalyn Waters – kalyn.waters@ufl.edu

Holmes County Extension Director working in the areas of Agricultural Management in row crop, natural resources, livestock and forage production. Specialized in Beef Cattle Production in the area of reproductive, nutritional and finical management.
http://holmes.ufl.ifas.edu

Kalyn Waters

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/07/panhandle-hay-production-conference-and-trade-show-january-25/

Cattle Market Price Watch: December 2016

Cattle Market Price Watch: December 2016

The August 2017 Feeder Cattle futures contract decreased by $ 0.22/cwt. during December.  Based on this futures price decrease, August Feeder Cattle revenues decreased by approximately $ 1.65/head ($ 0.22/cwt. * 7.5 cwt.) on a 750-pound feeder steer which amounts to $ 110.00/truckload (50,000 lbs.). The August Feeder Cattle futures contract high, contract low, and price range since September 2016 are $ 128.00, $ 109.90, and $ 18.10/cwt., respectively. The price range of $ 18.10/cwt. on a 750-pound feeder steer totals $ 135.75/head and $ 9,050.00/truckload.

  1. The breakeven price was estimated to be $ 722.10/hd. or $ 131.29/cwt. ($ 722.10/hd. divided by 5.50 cwt.). The breakeven price includes production costs of $ 705/hd. and death loss of $ 17.10/hd.
  2. The price objective was estimated to be $ 872.10/hd. or $ 158.56/cwt. ($ 872.10/hd. divided by 5.50 cwt.). The price objective includes production costs of $ 705/hd., death loss ($ 17.10/hd.), family living withdrawal ($ 100/hd.), and growth capital/retirement ($ 50/hd.).
  3. The expected cash price is equal to the daily August 2017 Feeder Cattle futures closing price plus an expected August 2017 South Florida 550 lb. Feeder Calf Basis of $ 2/cwt.

 

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Author: Chris Prevatt – prevacg@ufl.edu

Chris Prevatt

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/07/cattle-market-price-watch-december-2016/

Managing Forests and Farms for Fish and Wildlife Workshop – January 12

Managing Forests and Farms for Fish and Wildlife Workshop – January 12

Photo: Doug Mayo

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) along with the Florida Forest Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Office of Ag Water Policy, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Farm Credit of Northwest Florida, and University of Florida IFAS Extension will hold a public workshop on Thursday, January 12, 2017 in Marianna to discuss ways to manage forests and farms for fish and wildlife.

Featured topics for the workshop include, but are not limited to, Gopher Tortoise Habitat and Management, Prescribed Burning for Wildlife, Wildlife Best Management Practices, and Cost-share Programs.

The workshop will be from 9:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., CST at the UF/IFAS Jackson County Extension Service Office, 2741 Pennsylvania Ave., Marianna.

Lunch will be provided free of charge, but pre-registration must be complete by January 9. To pre-register for the workshop, contact Billie Clayton at (850) 767-3634.

AGENDA (All times central time)

  • 8:30 – Registration
  • 8:50 – Welcome and Introduction – Arlo Kane, Roy Lima
  • 9:00 – Gopher Tortoise Biology and Management– Arlo Kane, Wildlife Biologist, Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
  • 9:30 – SE American Kestrel Partnership – A new opportunity for landowners – Jeremy Martin, Wildlife Biologist, Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
  • 10:00 – Fire and Wildlife, When and How Should You Burn – Don Buchanan, Wildlife Biologist, Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
  • 10:30 – Break
  • 10:45 – The New Forestry Wildlife BMP’s for State Listed Species – Roy Lima, Forester, Florida Forest Service
  • 11:15 – The New Agricultural Wildlife BMP’s for State Listed Species – Daniel Stanley, Environmental Specialist, FDACS Office of Ag Water Policy
  • 11:45 – FORCES – A New Recognition Program for Forest Landowners – Sonny Greene, FORCES Coordinator
  • 12:30: – Cost Share Assistance Program Opportunities – Mary Jane Nelson, District Conservationist, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service and Barry Stafford, Senior Forester, Florida Forest Service
  • 12:40 – Lunch – Courtesy of Farm Credit of Northwest Florida
  • 1:30 – Adjourn

Download the printer friendly flyer:  Marianna Wildlife BMP workshop flyer Jan 12

 

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Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/07/managing-forests-and-farms-for-fish-and-wildlife-workshop-january-12/

2016 NASS Farm Land Rent and Labor Survey Summary

2016 NASS Farm Land Rent and Labor Survey Summary

Some of the most challenging conversations, in almost any relationship, are the ones about money.  This is certainly true as land owners and farmers, or managers and laborers negotiate for the year ahead. It can be pretty challenging to determine what is a fair price to rent a specific farm, or to set the wages for the skill sets of a specific employee, but, if you know the average rate, it does provide an unbiased place to start negotiations.  As with all statistics, just knowing the average is only part of the story, but at least it offers a reference point for both parties to begin the conversation.

Farm Land Rental Rates

The USDA’s National Agricultural Statistic Service (NASS) no longer provides annual summaries of land rental rates by county, but does compile a report on even years.  Unfortunately their survey summary does not offer the range of rates paid, but does offer county, regional, or state averages that provide an unbiased place to begin negotiations. There are a number of factors that influence the rental value of farm land.  Certainly farm size, crop history, soil type, and location influence lease rates.  A large, 300 acre field would be more attractive to rent than 15 acres, or a farm next door more valuable than an operation 10 miles away.  The amount of Farm Bill Base Acreage on the land also plays a role in setting the value of crop land rental rates.

The following is a summary of the information NASS provides on average land rental rates.  Table 1 provides the average rate for renting non-irrigated, or dryland crop land by county.  The average for the whole Panhandle region in 2016 was $ 64.50 per acre. There was certainly variation from county to county, with a high of $ 92.50/acre in Santa Rosa to a low $ 41/acre in Holmes County.

Table 1. Average Dryland crop rental rates reported by USDA NASS.

Since there are not as many irrigated farms, NASS reports their survey results by region, instead of by county.  Irrigated crop land is generally more productive and certainly more consistent, so the lease rates are generally much higher per acre. Table 2 shows the variation in irrigated farm lease rates in the tri-states region, with an average of $ 180/acre for the Southeast.

Table 2. Average irrigated crop land rental rates reported by USDA NASS.

Pasture rental rates were also surveyed.  Pasture lease rates are considerably lower than crop land, because livestock generate a much lower return per acre.  Table 3 illustrates the range of average pasture rent from $ 23.50/acre in Walton County to $ 40/acre in Escambia County.  The average pasture rent for the entire Panhandle was $ 34.50/acre in 2016.

Table 3 Average pasture rental rates reported by USDA NASS.

Farm Labor Wages

The other challenge that farmers and ranchers face is knowing what is a fair rate to pay their hired labor.  NASS only reports farm workers in general categories, so the averages provided in Table 4 may not fit specialized categories of workers.  NASS does not provide a regional or by county hired worker wage report, so this information came from across the state of Florida.

Table 4 Florida average farm worker wages reported by USDA NASS.

The USDA’s National Agricultural Statistic Services offers a wide range of additional information based on annual surveys and the Ag Census every five years.  To look at the information provided in this article, and other information from their surveys go to:  http://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/

 

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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/07/2016-nass-farm-land-rent-and-labor-survey-summary/

Tools for Assessing Soil Moisture

Tools for Assessing Soil Moisture

The exceptionally dry fall, followed by above average rainfall in December surprised many and it has been problematic for those trying to plant and manage winter cover or forage crops. Many might be wondering if their soils have enough moisture reserve to support a cover crop if you decide to try a late planting. This article provides some guidance on how to assess and track soil moisture without having to purchase expensive equipment. In fact, there are only two pieces of equipment required and the third is optional: 1) your fingers, 2) a rain gauge, and 3) internet access. You can roughly estimate soil moisture by the feel method and the rain gauge will help track future rain events. In addition, internet access will allow you to use some exciting and free AgroClimate tools related to rainfall and soil moisture.

Much of the surface soils (sandy to loamy sand textures) in the Florida Panhandle can hold from 0.6 to 1.2 inches of water per foot depth of soil. We call this the Available Water Capacity (AWC). In comparison, some of our heavier, sandy clay subsoils can hold up to 2 inches of water per foot depth of soil. Details on how to determine soil moisture by feel and appearance can be found in the following NRCS publication:  Estimating Soil Moisture by Feel and Appearance

In Florida, you can conservatively assume that your top foot of soil will hold up to 1 inch of water. You also need an inexpensive manual-read rain gauge to track rainfall at your location. During the cold winter weeks ahead, your plants (at full canopy) may lose approximately 0.3 inches of water per week in North Florida and up to 0.5 inches of water, downstate. In comparison, these losses can triple during the summer months. For the sake of this discussion, if it does not rain over the next three weeks, you might lose all available water in the top foot of soil, because the plants had removed nearly an inch of water (0.3 inches x 3 weeks). Luckily, roots are often growing deeper than a foot. Well-managed, cool-season cover or forage crops will have roots reaching below 2 feet, so they likely can extract another inch or more of deeper soil moisture before succumbing to drought.

Remember, the soil drying front begins at the surface and works its way down the soil profile over time. Dry conditions hit plants hardest when you have seedlings with rooting depths of only a few inches, where soil drying initiates. As of late December, the Panhandle had begun to recover from the dry fall and you might find that seeds that did not germinate during the prolonged dry period, are now germinating and establishing (Fig. 1). If the seed had begun developing roots during the drought, then it likely died and will not come back. Remember that exceedingly late emerging plants will likely need a little start-up nitrogen (30 to 50 lbs per acre) to continue growing strong. They have to compete with weeds and the older crop.

Fig. 1. Cereal rye planting in October, as conditions turned dry. About half of the seeds did not germinate until rainfall returned in December. Photo taken December 10th, 2016. Photo: Cheryl Mackowiak

Soil moisture forecasting relies on expert knowledge of climate and weather, which is not what most of us are trained in. Luckily, we all have free access to AgroClimate Forecasting ToolsThis site allows you to view maps of forecasted temperature and rainfall over short (day) through longer (months or seasonal) periods. After your first visit, you might become a real fan, like myself, and play with their other AgroClimate tools.  I recommend the Lawn and Garden Moisture Index (LGMI). This provides a good estimate of current soil moisture conditions for plant growth in the southeast U.S. (Fig. 2).

Fig. 2. Source: University of Alabama at Huntsville, Alabama state climatologist Lawn and Garden Moisture Index (LGMI). Values in green represent adequate to abundant moisture, while yellow to red represent increasing soil moisture deficit.

They even have a drought index, called ARID that you can tailor to your location by providing zip code and choosing among soil types. There has never been a better time to take advantage of what extension and research are reporting and providing in terms of information and personal online tools to help keep you growing!

 

PG

Author: Cheryl Mackowiak – echo13@ufl.edu


http://nfrec.ifas.ufl.edu

Cheryl Mackowiak

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/07/tools-for-assessing-soil-moisture/

Things You Should Know About Farm Food Safety

Things You Should Know About Farm Food Safety

It seems like years ago that the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) was signed into law, but it was actually 2011.  With a new congress convening this week, and the inauguration of President-Elect Donald Trump on January 20th, the outlook for FSMA is unpredictable.  Whatever the future may hold, there are a number of important food safety compliance facts you should know.

Exempt/Excluded Status

Depending on the size of your farm, what you grow, or your clientele, you may be exempt or excluded from FSMA.  Whatever your status may be, it is important that you understand food safety protocol and that you proactively and reactively reduce food safety risks on your farm.

  • Farms that have an annual value of produce sold of $ 25,000 (based on a three year average, adjusted for inflation) or less are not covered by the regulation.
  • The farm must have food sales less than $ 500,000 per year (based on a three year average, adjusted for inflation) AND the farm’s direct sales to qualified end-users must exceed sales to all buyers combined during the previous three years. (A qualified end-user is either the consumer of the food or a restaurant or retail food establishment that is located in the same state or the same Indian reservation as the farm or not more than 275 miles away.)
  • Produce Not Covered by the Regulation
    • Produce commodities that FDA has identified as rarely consumed raw: asparagus; black beans, great Northern beans, kidney beans, lima beans, navy beans, and pinto beans; garden beets (roots and tops) and sugar beets; cashews; sour cherries; chickpeas; cocoa beans; coffee beans; collards; sweet corn; cranberries; dates; dill (seeds and weed); eggplants; figs; ginger; hazelnuts; horseradish; lentils; okra; peanuts; pecans; peppermint; potatoes; pumpkins; winter squash; sweet potatoes; and water chestnuts.
    • Produce that is used for personal or on-farm consumption.
    • Produce that is not a raw agricultural commodity.  (A raw agricultural commodity is any food in its raw or natural state.)
  • A farm with the qualified exemption must still meet certain modified requirements, including prominently and conspicuously displaying the name and the complete business address of the farm where the produce was grown either on the label of the produce or at the point of purchase.

Compliance Deadlines

Required compliance dates are set based on farm size – the larger the farm, the sooner it will need to be in compliance.

  • Very small businesses, defined as greater than $ 25,000 but less than $ 250,000 in average annual (previous three year period) produce sales, will need to comply with the regulation within four years.
  • Small businesses, defined as greater than $ 250,000 but less than $ 500,000 in average annual (previous three year period) produce sales, will need to comply with the regulation within three years.
  • All other businesses, defined as greater than $ 500,000 in average annual (previous three year period) produce sales, will need to comply with the regulation within two years of the effective date.
  • Compliance dates for farms eligible for qualified exemptions are:
    • Labeling requirements (if applicable): January 1, 2020
    • Retention of records supporting eligibility for a qualified exemption: Effective date of final rule (January 26, 2016)
    • For all other modified requirements for farms growing covered produce other than sprouts: Very small businesses—4 years, Small businesses—3 years

Note:  The compliance dates for certain aspects of the agricultural water requirements allow an additional two years beyond each of these compliance dates.

Washing lettuce. Photo Credit: Cornell University Extension

Employee Training

Regardless of whether your farm has implemented a food safety plan or not, the FDA requires approved training under the FSMA Produce Safety Rule.

  • At least one supervisor or responsible party from a farm subject to the FSMA Produce Safety Rule must have successfully completed food safety training, at least equivalent to the standardized curriculum recognized as adequate by the FDA.
  • All workers that handle or contact covered produce or supervise workers must be trained based on FSMA standards.  Everyone working on the farm should receive annual instruction on how to accomplish his/her job.  Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) should be developed to provide clear step-by-step instructions for how workers should complete their daily tasks.
  • Visitors to the farm must be made aware of food safety policies set by the farm, and visitors must have access to toilet and handwashing facilities.

To read more on FSMA, please visit The Food Safety Modernization Act and the FDA Facility Registration Program.

An approved Food Safety Training is scheduled for February 13 in Marianna at the Jackson County Extension Office.  For more information, and to register for the training, please visit:

Farm Food Safety Certification Training – February 13

 

 

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Author: Matt Lollar – mlollar@ufl.edu

Matt Lollar is the Jackson County Horticulture Agent. He has 5 years of experience with University of Florida/IFAS Extension and he began his career in Sanford, FL as the Seminole County Horticulture Agent. Matt is originally from Belle Fontaine, AL. He earned his MS and BS degrees in Horticulture Production from Auburn University.

Matt Lollar

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/06/things-you-should-know-about-farm-food-safety/

Northwest Florida Beef Conference & Trade Show – February 8

Northwest Florida Beef Conference & Trade Show – February 8

The 32nd annual Northwest Florida Beef Conference and Trade Show will be held on Wednesday, February 8th in the Agriculture Conference Center, at the Jackson County Extension Office, located at 2741 Penn Avenue, Marianna, Florida. Registration and the Trade Show open at 7:30 AM central time, the program starts at 8:15 AM, and concludes with a steak lunch. There will be a $ 5 per person registration fee for advanced ticket sales, or $ 10 per person the day of the event.

Advanced tickets are available online through February 3rd at:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/northwest-florida-beef-conference-trade-show-tickets-30232908443

175 people attended the 2016 Northwest Florida Beef Conference. Photo credit: Doug Mayo

The focus of the five presentations at the 2017 Beef Conference will be: “Crucial Management in Challenging Times.”  Dr. Cliff Lamb, UF Beef Reproduction Specialist will be the keynote speaker, providing a presentation on essential reproductive management .  Dr. Matt Hersom, UF Beef Specialist will also be providing a key presentation on essential nutrition for the herd.  Charles Mitchell, Emeritus Auburn Soil Specialist will be discussing cost cutting techniques for pasture fertility  Other presentations will also focus on general ranch management with lower cattle prices.  For more details, download the printer friendly flyer:  2017 NW FL Beef Conference Flyer

Schedule of Events (all Central Time)

  •  7:30 – Trade Show & Registration Opens

  •   8:15 – Welcome

  •  8:30 – Riding Out the Cow Cycle:  What to Do When the Wheels Come Off?
    Jed Dillard, Jefferson County Agriculture Agent

  •  9:00 – Essential Reproductive Management Considerations
    Cliff Lamb, UF/IFAS Beef Reproduction Specialist

  •  9:45 – Trade Show & Snack Break

  • 10:30Essential Nutrition:  Put Your Money Where Her Mouth Is
    Matt Hersom, UF/IFAS Beef Extension Specialist

  • 11:15Strategies to Reduce Fertilizer Costs in Forage Systems
    Charles Mitchell, Emeritus Auburn Soil Specialist

  • 11:45Crunching the Numbers to Improve Ranch Efficiency
    Doug Mayo, Jackson County Extension Director

  • 12:15 – Grilled Steak Lunch

  • 12:45 – 1:30 Trade Show Open

In addition to the educational program, the Beef Conference will also feature a Trade Show of businesses and agencies that work with cattle producers in the region. Time is allotted on the schedule to allow visits with the company representatives to learn about specific products, equipment, and services they offer for beef cattle producers.

If you are interested in participating as a vendor in the Trade Show, use the following link to the website with more details:  Beef Conference Trade Show Exhibitor Info

The Northwest Florida Beef Conference and Trade Show is an educational program provided by the UF/IFAS Panhandle Agriculture Extension Team.

For more information on the Beef Conference, or to exhibit in the Trade Show, contact Doug Mayo, Beef Conference Chairman, at 850-482-9620, or demayo@ufl.edu.

 

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/12/19/northwest-florida-beef-conference-trade-show-february-8/

Medicated Livestock Feeds Will Require Veterinarian Authorization in 2017

Medicated Livestock Feeds Will Require Veterinarian Authorization in 2017

As January 1, 2017 nears, beef cattle producers need to be prepared for the Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) regulation. Photo courtesy of Troy Walz.

Livestock producers will need veterinarian authorization, similar to a prescription, to utilize feeds that include antibiotics in 2017. Photo credit: Troy Walz, Univ. of Nebraska

Source: FDA CVM Animal Feed Safety System Team

As of January 1, 2017, animal producers will not be able to purchase feeds over the counter that contain antimicrobials deemed important for human health. Instead, to buy and use feeds containing those antimicrobials, animal producers must be authorized by a licensed veterinarian who is operating under the Food and Drug Administration’s revised Veterinary Feed Directive, or VFD rule.

The VFD rule has been in effect for 20 years, but it affected only a small number of producers, and just a few antimicrobials. As of January 1, changes to the rule will mean that it will impact most animal producers and apply to many more antimicrobials.

The antimicrobials that will be covered by the VFD rule are considered “medically important,” because they are important for human health. A list of medically important antimicrobials is in Appendix A of FDA’s Guidance for Industry #152: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/AnimalVeterinary/GuidanceComplianceEnforcement/GuidanceforIndustry/UCM052519.pdf.

And, information on drugs transitioning from over-the-counter status to VFD status is available here: http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/ucm482107.htm.)

Also, after January 1, animal drug sponsors will have removed the claims of “growth promotion” and “feed efficiency” from the labels of medically important antimicrobials. Animal drug sponsors, in cooperation with CVM, are currently changing the labels for their products so that production claims such as “growth promotion” or “feed efficiency” will be gone from labels, thus those uses will no longer be permitted.

These changes will have a significant effect on the animal production industry. Animal producers must have a VFD order – issued by a licensed veterinarian, operating under a veterinarian-client-patient relationship – to use a feed with a medically important antimicrobial. (To find out more about veterinary-client-patient relationships, see Guidance for Industry #120, which you can get to from the VFD page listed below.)

The feed distributor that the producer works with must receive the order before releasing the VFD feed to the animal producer. The veterinarian can, for example, give the producer a second copy of the order (one for the producer to keep, and one for the producer to give to the feed distributor), or the veterinarian could send the order directly to the feed distributor.

The animal producer must use VFD feeds only in accordance with the VFD order. In other words, the producer can feed only those animals identified by the order, and only during the time period specified in the order. Feeding animals other than those specified in the VFD order or feeding them beyond the expiration date of the VFD order is considered an “extra-label” use of feed. That’s an illegal use. Once the order expires, if continued treatment is required, the animal producer must get a new VFD order from the veterinarian.

We understand that there are some questions concerning the use of antimicrobials in feed for show animals, including animals used in FFA and 4-H shows. If you have specific questions about the VFD rule and show animals, please send those questions to this e-mail address: AskCVM@fda.hhs.gov. Your questions will be promptly answered.

The changes in the VFD rule will help FDA address the issue of antimicrobial resistance. In principle, giving antimicrobial drugs to food-producing animals at low levels for long periods of time and giving the antimicrobial drugs to large numbers of animals may contribute to the development of antibiotic resistance, which makes diseases caused by resistant bacteria more difficult to treat. Finding antimicrobials to treat a disease is far more difficult when the disease is caused by resistant bacteria.

A veterinarian’s involvement is important because veterinarians have the medical training necessary to diagnose the disease and to identify the appropriate antimicrobial for the specific situation.  The veterinarian’s involvement will help to ensure judicious use of antimicrobials.

Here’s how you can find out more about the VFD rule.

More information, including brochures in both English and Spanish for producers, veterinarians, retailers, and distributors, is available on FDA’s VFD page: http://www.fda.gov/animalveterinary/developmentapprovalprocess/ucm071807.htm.

Information about the reasons for the change is in Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry #213, which you can find here http://www.fda.gov/downloads/AnimalVeterinary/GuidanceComplianceEnforcement/GuidanceforIndustry/UCM299624.pdf.

Should you have additional questions, please contact AskCVM@fda.hhs.gov.  And, for other information about safe feed, please come to www.FDA.Gov/SafeFeed, a site maintained by CVM’s Animal Feed Safety System Team.

 

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/12/17/medicated-livestock-feeds-will-require-veterinarian-authorization-in-2017/

November Cattle Market Price Watch

November Cattle Market Price Watch

Prevatt FL Cattle Market headerprevatt-chart-1-12-16The August 2017 Feeder Cattle futures contract increased by $ 7.66/cwt. during November. Based on this futures price increase, August Feeder Cattle revenues increased by approximately $ 57.45/head ($ 7.66/cwt. * 7.5 cwt.) on a 750-pound feeder steer which amounts to $ 3,830.00/truckload (50,000 lbs.). The August Feeder Cattle futures contract high, contract low, and price range since September 2016 are $ 128.00, $ 109.90, and $ 18.10/cwt., respectively. The price range of $ 18.10/cwt. on a 750-pound feeder steer totals $ 135.75/head and $ 9,050.00/truckload.prevatt-chart-2-12-16

  1. The breakeven price was estimated to be $ 722.10/hd. or $ 131.29/cwt. ($ 722.10/hd. divided by 5.50 cwt.). The breakeven price includes production costs of $ 705/hd. and death loss of $ 17.10/hd.
  2. The price objective was estimated to be $ 872.10/hd. or $ 158.56/cwt. ($ 872.10/hd. divided by 5.50 cwt.). The price objective includes production costs of $ 705/hd., death loss ($ 17.10/hd.), family living withdrawal ($ 100/hd.), and growth capital/retirement ($ 50/hd.).
  3. The expected cash price is equal to the daily August 2017 Feeder Cattle futures closing price, plus an expected August 2017 South Florida 550 lb. Feeder Calf Basis of $ 2/cwt.

 

PG

Author: Chris Prevatt – prevacg@ufl.edu

Chris Prevatt

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/12/17/november-cattle-market-price-watch/

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