Panhandle Agriculture

Weed of the Week: Maypop Passion Flower

Weed of the Week: Maypop Passion Flower

Maypop Passion Flower Photo Credit: Dr. Brent Sellers

Often recognized by its showy pink/purple flowers, Maypop Passion Flower is a native plant, found across the southern US.  Although it is sometimes used as an ornamental plant, it can become a nuisance in pastures and along fence-rows.  Once the flowers bloom, from July to September, it is easy to identify, however, it is not as easy to control in most pasture scenarios. With thick, deep rhizomes, often mechanical or cultural control of Maypop fail, leaving the best option to high rates of 2,4-D.

For help identifying weeds, or development of a control plan for your operation, please contact your county extension agent. 

For more information on this topic please see the following UF/IFAS Publication:

Weed Management in Pastures and Rangeland—2017

 

 

PG

Author: Kalyn Waters – kalyn.waters@ufl.edu

Holmes County Extension Director working in the areas of Agricultural Management in row crop, natural resources, livestock and forage production. Specialized in Beef Cattle Production in the area of reproductive, nutritional and finical management.
http://holmes.ufl.ifas.edu

Kalyn Waters

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/30/weed-of-the-week-maypop-passion-flower/

2017 Sunbelt Ag Expo – October 17-19

2017 Sunbelt Ag Expo – October 17-19

Aerial photo of the 100 acre exhibit area of the Sunbelt Ag Expo. Credit: Sunbelt Ag Expo

The Sunbelt Agricultural Expo will celebrate its 40th anniversary with this year’s show to be held on Tuesday, October 17 through Thursday, October 19, 2017 just outside of Moultire, Georgia.  Physical Location:  290-G Harper Boulevard, Moultrie, GA 31788-2157.  Gates open at 8:30 AM Eastern Time and close at 5:00 PM on Tuesday and Wednesday, and at 4:00 PM on Thursday.  The entry fee is $ 10 per person at the gate, or $ 8 per person in advance through October 13th.

The 40th Annual Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition is an ag based trade show located at Spence Field in Moultrie, Georgia. The Expo showcases the latest in agricultural technology hosting 1200 exhibitors in its 100-acre static exhibit area. The 600-acre working research farm gives visitors the opportunity to see first-hand the equipment performing in the harvesting and tillage demonstrations that are held each day. Twenty-one specialty sections along with educational seminars, demonstrations, and test tracks all combine to create “North America’s Premier Farm Show.” Source:  Sunbelt Ag Expo

The 600 acre working farm provides an opportunity to see numerous types of harvest equipment from multiple companies in action on the field tours. Credit: Sunbelt Ag Expo

There truly is so much to see and experience at this annual event.  There is a tremendous variety of exhibits, demonstrations, and vendors to see for every type of agriculture, from row crop farmer, livestock rancher, vegetable producer, and homesteader. There are sections devoted to managing fish ponds, home gardening, all types of livestock including poultry, cattle, horses, and goats, all sorts of field crops, and every type of equipment used on the farm in the south.  Plus there are field demonstrations of peanut, cotton, and hay equipment.  There are stock dog trails and fishing demonstrations, cooking and gardening demonstrations, food vendors, and new equipment and gadgets to make all sorts of jobs easier.  This event provides a unique opportunity to see the latest innovations and technology for the commercial farm to the part-time small farm and homestead.

UF/IFAS Extension and other land-grant universities also have exhibit barns at the Sunbelt Ag Expo.  Stop by the UF/IFAS barn on your visit and enjoy some free orange juice and peanuts.  This year the theme of the exhibit is plant production with interactive exhibits featuring horticulture, crops, and forages.  Extension agents from across Florida will be manning the exhibits, so come by to see us while you are there.

This show is so diverse and so large you want to have a plan before you come.  Wear comfortable shoes and bring cash to purchase food and beverages.  There is even an app that you can download for your smart phone to guide your visit: 2017 Sunbelt Ag Expo App.  Use the following link to view the schedule of the numerous seminars, demonstrations, and events scheduled for this year’s Ag Expo, so you can set your own schedule for the days you attend:  2017 Sunbelt Ag Expo Schedule of Events.  

Check out this year’s promotional video to see the wide variety of opportunities that await at this years’ Sunbelt Expo:

 

For more information, driving directions, advanced ticket sales, and details on the numerous exhibits and events, go to Sunbelt Expo website:

Sunbelt Ag Expo

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/29/2017-sunbelt-ag-expo-october-17-19/

Utilizing the Information on the Tag of a Seed Bag

Utilizing the Information on the Tag of a Seed Bag

Useful information is provided on every bag of certified seed. Make sure you know what you are buying by reviewing the seed tag before making the investment.   Photo credit: Doug Mayo

Fall is here so it is time to prepare for winter grazing. Once you determine the variety(s) you will be planting (2017 Cool-Season Forage Variety Recommendations for Florida), the next step is to order and purchase the seed. However, not all seed is equal. While most cattlemen are familiar with reading feed tags, you may not be as familiar with the information provided on the tags of seed bags. Just as the feed tag provides vital information about the product in the bag, so too does a seed tag.  Like many other purchasing decisions, it is important to know the details before you make the purchase.

Many legumes seeds are bagged with a coating that contains the correct inoculant for that variety. Based on the information provided on this seed tag, only 25 lbs are actual seeds. Credit Dr. Jose Dubeux

The following are commonly found on all certified seed tags: Name, Lot Number, Purity, Other Crop, Inert, Weed Seed, Noxious Weeds, Germination, Dormant or Hard Seed, Total Viability, Origin, Date Tested, Net Weight, and the Name and Address of the Seller.  Full definitions of these can be found in the NRCS Factsheet: A Guide to Understanding Seed Tags.  Most of these components are easily interpreted, however there a few key points to keep in mind:

  • Purity, inert, other crop and weed seed are reported as a percentage, while noxious weeds are reported as total number of weed seeds per pound of seed.
  • Total Viability is the combination of immediate and dormant or hard seed germination.   Example: if germination = 76% and dormant = 6%, the total viability would be 82%.  This means that the vast majority of the seed will germinate right away, but a small percentage will sprout some time later.  The hard seed provides some insurance of a stand, if conditions immediately after planting become unfavorable.
  • If other crop is over 5%, the crops it contains must be listed on the tag.
  • The Test Date gives you an idea how fresh the seed is.  The Southern Seed Certification Association requires retesting of germination and purity for re-certification of seed carried over from the previous season.

Keep in mind that state law requires each bag of certified seed to be tagged, and include a lot number. It is a great practice to save at least one seed tag for your records until the end of the growing season. This allows for traceability of the seed, if there is a major stand issue, or a question about the crop that was planted.

More information on seed certification standards and procedures, and the noxious weed list can be found in the following fact sheet:

General Seed Certification Standards of the Southern Seed Certification Association

 

 

PG

Author: Kalyn Waters – kalyn.waters@ufl.edu

Holmes County Extension Director working in the areas of Agricultural Management in row crop, natural resources, livestock and forage production. Specialized in Beef Cattle Production in the area of reproductive, nutritional and finical management.
http://holmes.ufl.ifas.edu

Kalyn Waters

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/29/utilizing-the-information-on-the-tag-of-a-seed-bag/

Why is Nematode Damage Patchy in Crop Fields? How Does this Affect Management Decisions?

Why is Nematode Damage Patchy in Crop Fields? How Does this Affect Management Decisions?

I’ve had the opportunity to visit a number of grower fields this summer to assess potential nematode damage and I’ve often been asked this question: “Why is nematode damage worse in one section of a field than another, or worse in one field than another one nearby? ” This question reflects the fact that nematode population densities and damage are often patchy both within a field and between different fields.

Patchy necrosis (dead or dying plants) and chlorosis (yellowing) in a peanut field with severe root-knot nematode infestation.

There are a number of reasons nematode infestations or damage is often patchy:

  1. Management history

This is an important factor for variation between fields.  Factors such as crop rotation, cover crop use, weed management, nematicide use, use of resistant cultivars, and other practices all affect nematode populations.  Nematodes need a living host crop to feed on and reproduce, so nematode populations will be higher in areas where a host cash crop, cover crop, or weed has grown.

  1. Nematode dispersal is (usually) relatively slow

Nematodes don’t move far on their own.  Rather, they are moved by human or natural activity, often slowly. Nematodes are moved to new fields or moved within a field on farm equipment, infected plant material, or water or wind-born soil.  Therefore, a new nematode infection in a field often starts from a single point, such as near a field entrance, and spreads relatively slowly.

  1. Field variation in soil type and other properties or features

Soil properties such as soil type, temperature, and moisture can affect nematode reproduction, and when these factors vary within or between fields, nematode population densities do as well.  Most nematodes prefer sandy soil, and are more likely to thrive in sandy fields or sandy patches within a field.  One exception is reniform nematode which tends to do best with moderate amounts of sand (70-80%) and is a pathogen of cotton, soybean, and most vegetables.  Nematodes prefer a moderate amount of moisture and relatively high temperatures, so if these factors vary across a field, perhaps due to hills and valleys, nematode populations may vary as well.

  1. Field variation in crop health, weeds, pathogens, biocontrol organisms, and other biological factors

Crop health can also affect the severity of nematode damage, as a healthy plant can better withstand nematode infection than a plant stressed by nutrient deficiency, drought, competition from weeds, or other factors that can vary across a field.  Similarly, crop damage is often increased when soil-borne pathogens and nematodes co-infect.  A number of soil-borne bacteria and fungi are known to kill nematodes and could act as natural biocontrol agents, helping keep nematode populations low.  Variation in populations of pathogens and biocontrol agents across fields may contribute to nematode damage or population variation.

Patchy chlorosis (yellowing) in a peanut field due to root-knot nematode.

Knowledge of population density should influence nematode management practices in a number of ways:

  1. Work to control the spread of nematodes

Because human activity is one of the main ways nematodes are moved, human actions can help slow nematode spread, especially from field to field.  Use nematode-free planting material, don’t move plant material from field to field, and wash equipment free of soil when possible.

  1. Account for field variation when sampling for nematodes

Sampling for nematodes is an important part of a nematode management strategy.  When sampling for nematodes, sample areas at high risk of nematode damage (sandy, poor fertility) separately from areas at lower risk of damage.  This could coincide with soil mapping, such as with a Veris rig or soil type maps, and division into management zones.

  1. Spot-treat areas with nematode problems

Once a field is infected, nematode management relies on crop rotation, resistant cultivars, and nematicide application.  Particularly for expensive, high-input nematode management practices such as nematicide application, treating only the areas of a field with nematode problems can save time and money.  Ideally, areas with nematode problems should be identified by sampling and could coincide with management zones based on soil properties.

  1. Promote crop health and manage weeds

Soil type and other factors that affect nematode distribution are hard to control, but growers have some control over crop health and weeds.  A healthy crop is more tolerant of nematodes, so properly fertilized crops and the use of other practices to promote vigor can reduce yield losses.  As discussed above, weeds also harbor nematodes, so it is important to manage weeds early.

Further information and resources can be found in the following UF/IFAS EDIS fact sheets:

Sampling for nematodes

Florida cotton nematode management guide

Nematode management in tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant

Precision agriculture

 

PG

Author: Zane Grabau – zgrabau@ufl.edu

Zane Grabau is a field crop nematology Assistant Professor at the University of Florida.

Zane Grabau

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/29/why-is-nematode-damage-patchy-in-crop-fields-how-does-this-affect-management-decisions/

Friday Feature: UF Ag Students Pitch In with Irma Recovery

Friday Feature:  UF Ag Students Pitch In with Irma Recovery

UF/IFAS Extension teamed up with students and faculty from the University of Florida College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and volunteers from the community to help a Pasco County blueberry farmer following Hurricane Irma.

Last week the featured video highlighted the terrible damage to the Citrus Industry in Southwest Florida caused by Hurricane Irma.  The damage from this storm was immense, but people all over the state are banding together to help people in need.  This week’s featured video, published by UF/IFAS News, shares how more than 200 volunteers from the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, and the local community gathered on a hot, windy Saturday to save thousands of blueberry bushes damaged by Hurricane Irma on Frogmore Fresh Farm in Pasco County.

Read the IFAS News article for more details on what took place:

UF students, faculty among hundreds who replanted blueberry bushes damaged by storm

***********************************************************************************

If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

 

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/23/friday-feature-uf-ag-students-pitch-in-with-irma-recovery/

Farm Bureau Hurricane Irma Relief Fund for Agriculture

Farm Bureau Hurricane Irma Relief Fund for Agriculture

De Soto County Citrus after Hurricane Irma. Source: FL Farm Bureau

Farmers and ranchers throughout Florida are working tirelessly to restore food and fiber production for our state and the nation after Hurricane Irma wreaked destruction on much of the state. The total economic loss for agriculture is expected to be in the billions.

Fall Melons damaged by Hurricane Irma in St. Johns County. Source: FL Farm Bureau

Hurricane Irma significantly impacted Florida agriculture throughout the state.  Florida Farm Bureau is accepting tax-deductible donations to aid in relief to Florida farmers devastated by Hurricane Irma.

Hurricane Irma Relief Fund for Agriculture

Checks should be made payable to:

Florida Farm Bureau Women’s Fund
Memo: Hurricane Irma Relief for Agriculture
P.O. Box 147030
Gainesville, FL 32614

Please contact Staci Sims with additional questions.

 

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/23/farm-bureau-hurricane-irma-relief-fund-for-agriculture/

Highlights & Proceedings from the UF/IFAS Beef & Forage Field Day

Highlights & Proceedings from the UF/IFAS Beef & Forage Field Day

Dr. Nicolas DiLorenzo welcomed everyone to the Beef Unit near Marianna.

Over 120 cattle producers, extension agents, research faculty and staff attended the UF/IFAS Beef & Forage Field Day that was held on Friday, September 15, 2017 at the North Florida Research and Education Center’s Beef Unit, near Marianna, Florida.  The event consisted of a tour of six demonstrations sites and a presentation at the main pavilion right before lunch.  The NFREC Beef and Forage Program hosts a field day every 18 months, so that both fall and spring cattle and forage management can be highlighted.

Integrating Rhizoma Peanut into Grazing Systems

Dr Jose Dubeux, UF Forage Management Specialist shared the results of two years of data working on a project to integrate rhizoma (aka perennial) peanut into bahiagrass pastures to reduce nitrogen fertilization requirements and boost animal performance.  He has compared a traditional system of bahiagrass and overseeded smallgrains that requires 100 pounds of total nitrogen fertilization per year, to a system with a Bahia/rhizoma peanut mixture plus an overseeded cool-season grass/legume mixture with only 30 pounds of nitrogen fertilization.  Thus far the legume/grass pastures have provided comparable performance to the traditional grass pastures with lower nitrogen fertilization.

Brunswick Grass Overview

Dr. Ann Blount showed tour participants how to identify a troublesome weed in Florida called Brunswick Grass.  This weed is in the same family (Paspalum) as bahiagrass, but livestock do not like to graze it once it starts to mature.  The main challenge with this weed is that the seed is of similar size and weight to Bahia, so it cannot be easily separated after seed harvest in the cleaning process.  There are also no herbicides currently on the market that will control Brunswick grass without injuring bahiagrass.

A More Nitrogen Efficient Soil

Drs. Sunny Liao and Cheryl Mackowiak discussed pasture fertilization and soil health.  Integrating forages and livestock grazing into a crop rotation system can increase soil organic matter and the soil microorganisms that mineralize fertilizer into plant available nitrogen (PAN).  With higher organic matter in the topsoil, plants can access more of the nutrients needed for growth.  Because forages have extensive root systems, developed from longer growth periods than annual crops, soil organic matter is enhanced improving the productivity of a field.  Future UF research will focus on how grazing management and forage systems affect soil health.

Weed ID and Control

Mark Mauldin, Washington County Extension Agriculture Agent shared the results of a pasture weed control and fertilization demonstration.  Eight different pasture herbicides were applied in strips so participants could see their effectiveness on the weeds in the demonstration plots as compared to untreated areas.  He also showed participants a comparison of how mowing, fertilization, and herbicides impacted forage production versus untreated forages.

Balancing Hay with Commodity Byproducts

Dr. Nicolas DiLorenzo, UF Beef Specialist and Doug Mayo, Jackson County Extension Director, provided a demonstration of supplementation needed for two different types of hay.  The Beef Research Unit produces both bahiagrass and Bermudagrass hay to feed their cattle in the fall and early winter.  Using the forage test results for the two types of hay and the requirements of a 1200 pound mature cow in late gestation, alternative supplements were measured out and displayed using five-gallon buckets.  Five different byproduct feeds were discussed and compared for use for supplementing the nutrient shortfall of the two types of hay.

Cracking the Bull Buying Code

Kalyn Waters, Holmes County Extension Director and Ken Stewart, Southern Cattle Company discussed bull selection using the performance data provided through the different breed associations.  They shared how producers can establish benchmarks to guide bull buying decisions using the information provided in sale catalogs to identify the bulls of greatest interest before viewing the bulls in person prior to a sale.  With the combination of genetic performance data and visual appraisal, cattle producers can develop a budget and make wiser purchasing decisions as the sale progresses.

Carcass Merit of the Current US Beef Industry

Dr. Chad Carr, UF Extension Meat Specialist shared a summary of the results of the 2016 National Beef Quality Audit.  He highlighted several trends as compared to the previous audits made every five years since 1991.  The main two trends he shared from the recent audit were that carcasses are getting heavier with some improvement in quality grade.  The average carcass weight from the survey was 859 pounds, which was 67 pounds heavier than ten years ago, and 36 pounds more than five years ago.  Of the 7,379 beef carcasses evaluated in the audit, 1% were 1,800 pounds live steers with carcass weights of over 1,100 pounds.  Theses larger cattle also graded 71% choice and prime, as compared to 61% five years ago.

For more details on the information provided at the Field Day, use the following link to access the proceedings from the event:

2017 UF/IFAS Beef & Forage Field Day Proceedings

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/23/highlights-proceedings-from-the-ufifas-beef-forage-field-day/

Vegetable Crops Field Day – October 13

Vegetable Crops Field Day – October 13

The 2017 UF/IFAS Vegetable Crops Field Day will provide the latest research information for commercial growers of watermelons, squash, and tomatoes. The event will be held at the North Florida Research and Education Center located at 155 Research Road, in Quincy Florida.

Learn the results of the latest research on…

  • Soil Fumigant Trials

  • Deep Drip Tape Fumigation

  • Deep Core Nematode Sampling Results

  • Cucurbit Disease Trials

  • Bacterial Spot, Bacterial Wilt, & Target Spot Trials

  • Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Trials

Pesticide Applicator CEUs will be provided, along with a sponsored lunch!  This is a free event but we do ask that you RSVP by calling 850-482-9620 or emailing s.farr@ufl.edu.

PG

Author: Matt Lollar – mlollar@ufl.edu

Matt Lollar is the Jackson County Horticulture Agent. He has 5 years of experience with University of Florida/IFAS Extension and he began his career in Sanford, FL as the Seminole County Horticulture Agent. Matt is originally from Belle Fontaine, AL. He earned his MS and BS degrees in Horticulture Production from Auburn University.

Matt Lollar

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/23/vegetable-crops-field-day-october-13/

Weed of the Week: Cogongrass

Weed of the Week: Cogongrass

Cogongrass will take over native or cultivated vegetation, as can be seen in this hay field. Photo credit: Doug Mayo

Cogongrass was accidentally introduced into Alabama in the 1900’s, but intentionally brought to Florida in the 1930’s as a potential forage and soil stabilizer. Currently it can be found in 73 countries and on every continent. Since being introduced Cogongrass has spread to nearly every county in Florida, and today is considered a major pest issue. This warm-season perennial grass species, has an extensive root system, with 60% of the plant’s total biomass underground, which makes control very difficult.

For assistance with weed identification or for developing a control plan for your operation, please contact your local  county extension agent

For more information on this topic please see the following UF/IFAS Publication:

Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica) Biology, Ecology, and Management in Florida Grazing Lands

 

PG

Author: Kalyn Waters – kalyn.waters@ufl.edu

Holmes County Extension Director working in the areas of Agricultural Management in row crop, natural resources, livestock and forage production. Specialized in Beef Cattle Production in the area of reproductive, nutritional and finical management.
http://holmes.ufl.ifas.edu

Kalyn Waters

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/22/weed-of-the-week-cogongrass/

Forest Stewardship Tour of Sandhill Farm in Jackson County – October 5

Forest Stewardship Tour of Sandhill Farm in Jackson County – October 5

Sandhill Farm in Jackson County. Credit: Billy Boothe

Sandhill Farm – Property of David and Cindi Stewart

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Meet at the property at 9:00 AM CT – Adjourn after lunch

When Cindi and David Stewart first saw the mosaic of sandhills, swamps, flatwoods and loblolly pine forest making up this 222-acre Jackson County property, they knew they would buy it. Avid hikers from the south-central Florida suburbs, they loved being in the forest. That was 14 years ago, and they have come a long way towards their goal of managing their property for wildlife habitat. After beginning their land management education with the Master Tree Farmer and Master Wildlifer short courses offered by Clemson University and University of Florida IFAS Extension, they sought advice and a Forest Stewardship management plan from the Florida Forest Service and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.
Following some hard work managing underbrush, they planted 50 acres of longleaf pine.  With diverse wildlife habitat as a primary goal, they burn every two years and have some beautiful groundcover plants like wiregrass and blazing star.  In 2006, they were awarded Jackson County Tree Farmers of the Year. Join us for a walking tour of this property.  This will be a relatively short hike on trails.  Please wear appropriate clothing and footwear for the field.
Cost is $ 10 per person, lunch and materials included. Register online at https://fsp-tour100517.eventbrite.com/. You can also reserve a space by contacting UF/IFAS Jackson County Extension at (850) 482-9620, and pay at the event with cash or check payable to University of Florida.  Space is limited so register early. Please share this announcement with others who may be interested.

Use the following link for the printer friendly event flyer with directions and a map for driving to the property:

Sandhill Farm Stewardship Tour

Driving Directions

David and Cindi Stewart’s Sandhills Farm – 357 Pittman Hill Road – Marianna, FL 32448 – (850) 579-8848
From I-10, Marianna:
  • Exit at the western-most Marianna exit (Exit #136), SR 276.
  • Turn left on SR 276 West and go less than 1 mile to CR 167 South (signs to Panama City &Fountain)
  • Turnleft on CR 167 South
  • Travel about 9.8 miles south on CR 167 to Nortek Blvd. (yellow intersection sign indicating Nortek Blvd & second sign for Compass Lakes inthe Hills) – turn left (east) on Nortek Blvd. -Travel east on Nortek Blvd. until the pavement ends –our property begins on your left as the pavement ends.
  • Stay on Nortek Blvd./Hasty Pond Road (the name changes as the pavement ends) for another ½ mile.
  • Turn left (north) at the first intersection onto Pittman Hill Road
  • They have the first real driveway (with a mailbox) on the left, after you pass the pond on the left –less than ½ mile. The house number “357” is on the mailbox. Follow the power poles to the house.

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/22/forest-stewardship-tour-of-sandhill-farm-in-jackson-county-october-5/

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