Tag Archive: 2014

2014 USDA Honey Production Report

2014 USDA Honey Production Report

According to USDA 2014 was a good year for US beekeepers with both record high prices and also an increase in total production.  Photo credit: Doug Mayo

According to USDA, last year was a good year for US beekeepers with both record high prices and also an increase in total production. Photo credit: Doug Mayo

USDA released their annual Honey Production Report last Friday, March 20, 2015.  2014 was a good year for US beekeepers with both record high prices and also an increase in total production.  The following is a summary of what their survey data showed and some highlights from their report:

United States Honey Production Up 19 Percent

Honey production in 2014 from producers with five or more colonies totaled 178 million pounds, up 19 percent from 2013. There were 2.74 million colonies producing honey in 2014, up 4 percent from 2013. Yield per colony averaged 65.1 pounds, up 15 percent from the 56.6 pounds in 2013. Colonies which produced honey in more than one State were counted in each State where the honey was produced. Therefore, at the United States level, yield per colony may be understated, but total production would not be impacted. Colonies were not included if honey was not harvested. Producer honey stocks were 41.2 million pounds on December 15, 2014, up 8 percent from a year earlier. Stocks held by producers exclude those held under the commodity loan program.

Record High Honey Prices

Honey prices increased to a record high during 2014, to 216.1 cents per pound, up 1 percent from 214.1 cents per pound in 2013. United States and State level prices reflect the portions of honey sold through cooperatives, private, and retail channels. Prices for each color class are derived by weighting the quantities sold for each marketing channel. Prices for the 2013 crop reflect honey sold in 2013 and 2014. Some 2013 crop honey was sold in 2014, which caused some revisions to the 2013 crop prices.

Download the full report:  USDA Honey Production Report 3-20-15

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Jackson County Extension Director, Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/03/28/2014-usda-honey-production-report/

Update on 2014 peanut leaf spot fungicide trials in Citra, FL.

Figure 1. An aerial image of 2014 peanut leaf spot fungicide trial from the University of Florida Plant Science Research and Education Unit in Citra, FL on 9/25/14.

Figure 1. An aerial image of 2014 peanut leaf spot fungicide trial from the University of Florida Plant Science Research and Education Unit in Citra, FL on 9/25/14.

The management of early and late leaf spot in peanuts is an essential task for growers each year. Currently, there are a number of fungicide products available for leaf spot control that can adequately manage this disease. However, as Dr. Kemerait indicated in his recent blog post, there are reports suggesting that the important leaf spot fungicide chlorothalonil may have limited stock in 2015. Dealing with the challenges related to this possible shortage means utilizing different fungicide chemistries and paying close attention to resistance management practices (e.g. proper rotation of fungicide mode of actions).

While there are many products available for leaf spot control, two products that will be important to keep an eye on are azoxystrobin (e.g. Abound®) and pyraclostrobin (i.e. Headline®). Both of these products have been effective management tools for leaf spots in the past, but with azoxystrobin’s recent patent expiration there are more products currently available with this chemistry (e.g. Azaka, Equation, and others). The addition of these products will be useful to many peanut and vegetable growers, however, the risk for pathogens to develop resistance to these fungicides is high. Monitoring the effectiveness of these as well as other fungicides is important for developing sustainable leaf spot management programs.

Small plot research data from trials using cultivar Georgia-06G at the University of Florida Plant Science Research and Education Unit (PSREU) in Citra, FL indicated that the products azoxystrobin and pyraclostrobin as well as tebuconazole, commonly called generic Folicur, exhibited reduced efficacy against early and/or late leaf spot (Figures 2 & 3). Comparisons of these three fungicide products shows that tebuconazole was the best early leaf spot product, pyraclostrobin provided maximum control of late leaf spot, and both azoxystrobin and pyraclostrobin limited rust in the peanut plots (Figure 3). However, all 3 products produced comparable yields at the end of the season (Figure 4). Overall, these results indicate the importance of how the excess use of one fungicidal product can lead to reductions in efficacy of leaf spot control.

Figure 2.  Example plots from the 2014 leaf spot fungicide trial in Citra, FL showing visual results of the different fungicide treatments on 10/22/15. The treatments consisted of an untreated check (no sprays) and a 7 spray program using only chlorothalonil (Echo 720 @ 1.5 pts/A, Chloro. Only), tebuconazole (TebuStar @ 7.2 fl oz/A, Teb. Only), azoxystrobin (Abound @ 18 fl oz/A, Azoxy. Only) and pyraclostrobin (Headline @ 9 fl oz/A, Pyrac. Only).

Figure 2. Example plots from the 2014 leaf spot fungicide trial in Citra, FL showing visual results of the different fungicide treatments on 10/22/15. The treatments consisted of an untreated check (no sprays) and a 7 spray program using only chlorothalonil (Echo 720 @ 1.5 pts/A, Chloro. Only), tebuconazole (TebuStar @ 7.2 fl oz/A, Teb. Only), azoxystrobin (Abound @ 18 fl oz/A, Azoxy. Only) and pyraclostrobin (Headline @ 9 fl oz/A, Pyrac. Only).

 

Figure 3.  Mean disease incidence results collected on 9/25/14 from leaf spot fungicide trial at the University of Florida Plant Science Research and Education Unit in Citra, FL. Incidence was based on the number of leaves out of 40 that showed at least one symptom or sign of the disease. Diseases monitored in this study were early (ELS) and late (LLS) leaf spot, and peanut rust (Rust). Fungicide treatments consisted of an untreated check (no sprays) and a 7 spray program using only chlorothalonil (Echo 720 @ 1.5 pts/A, Chloro. Only), tebuconazole (TebuStar @ 7.2 fl oz/A, Teb. Only), azoxystrobin (Abound @ 18 fl oz/A, Azoxy. Only) and pyraclostrobin (Headline @ 9 fl oz/A, Pyrac. Only).

Figure 3. Mean disease incidence results collected on 9/25/14 from leaf spot fungicide trial at the University of Florida Plant Science Research and Education Unit in Citra, FL. Incidence was based on the number of leaves out of 40 that showed at least one symptom or sign of the disease. Diseases monitored in this study were early (ELS) and late (LLS) leaf spot, and peanut rust (Rust). Fungicide treatments consisted of an untreated check (no sprays) and a 7 spray program using only chlorothalonil (Echo 720 @ 1.5 pts/A, Chloro. Only), tebuconazole (TebuStar @ 7.2 fl oz/A, Teb. Only), azoxystrobin (Abound @ 18 fl oz/A, Azoxy. Only) and pyraclostrobin (Headline @ 9 fl oz/A, Pyrac. Only).

 

Figure 4.  Mean yield results from the 2014 leaf spot fungicide trial at the University of Florida Plant Science Research and Education Unit in Citra, FL. Plots consisted of 2 rows that were 25 ft long replicated 4 times. Fungicide treatments consisted of an untreated check (no sprays) and a 7 spray program using only chlorothalonil (Echo 720 @ 1.5 pts/A, Chloro. Only), tebuconazole (TebuStar @ 7.2 fl oz/A, Teb. Only), azoxystrobin (Abound @ 18 fl oz/A, Azoxy. Only) and pyraclostrobin (Headline @ 9 fl oz/A, Pyrac. Only).

Figure 4. Mean yield results from the 2014 leaf spot fungicide trial at the University of Florida Plant Science Research and Education Unit in Citra, FL. Plots consisted of 2 rows that were 25 ft long replicated 4 times. Fungicide treatments consisted of an untreated check (no sprays) and a 7 spray program using only chlorothalonil (Echo 720 @ 1.5 pts/A, Chloro. Only), tebuconazole (TebuStar @ 7.2 fl oz/A, Teb. Only), azoxystrobin (Abound @ 18 fl oz/A, Azoxy. Only) and pyraclostrobin (Headline @ 9 fl oz/A, Pyrac. Only).

Despite the loss of efficacy of disease control with solo applications of these products in the field, no resistant isolates were detected in laboratory assays. Thus, while this research indicates the importance of monitoring for resistance within peanut fields, it also suggests that these products can still be effective components of an integrated control strategy. Further work is being conducted on pathogen isolates collected from the 2014 PSREU trial and research plots in Marianna and Quincy, FL. Similar field trials to the 2014 PSREU trial will also be repeated during the 2015 growing season.

Ultimately, there are a multitude of products available for leaf spot control in peanuts. The effectiveness of some of these products has decreased with time, but through proper planning (e.g. Peanut Rx-Android and-iPhone) and product rotation many of these products can still be effective components of a disease management program. Monitoring the efficacy of fungicide products during 2015 will be key in identifying resistant populations present in Florida, if any.

Should concerns arise about a product application, please contact your local extension office for more information.

 

PG

Author: Nicholas Duafult – nsdufault@ufl.edu

Extension Plant Pathologist for Vegetable and Row Crops
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Field-Veg-Plant-Pathology-Lab-at-UF/510711278961763?sk=timeline

Nicholas Duafult

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/03/28/update-on-2014-peanut-leaf-spot-fungicide-trials-in-citra-fl/

US Beef Cow Herd Increased 2% in 2014

US Beef Cow Herd Increased 2% in 2014

Source:  USDA NASS

Source: USDA NASS

Derrell S. Peel, Oklahoma State University Extension Livestock Marketing Specialist

The inventory of all cattle and calves was 89.8 million head on January 1, 2015, up 1.4 percent from one year ago but, except for last year, still the smallest total herd inventory since 1952.  The 2014 calf crop was up 0.5 percent from 2013 at 33.9 million head.  The 2014 calf crop percentage (calf crop as a percent of all cows) was 88.5 percent, the highest percentage since 2006.  Total U.S. cattle on feed on January 1 were 13.1 million head, up one percent from last year.  The estimated supply of feeder cattle outside feedlots was up 0.5 percent as a result of one percent increases in the inventory of steers, 500 pounds and over and calves, under 500 pounds; along with a slight decrease in the inventory of other heifers.  Dairy cows and dairy replacement heifers were up one percent from one year ago.

The U.S. beef cow herd grew by 2.1 percent in 2014 to 29.7 million head according to the January 2015 Cattle Report.  Though beef cow herd expansion was anticipated, this was a larger than expected increase.  The largest increases were in Texas, at 107 percent of last year; and Oklahoma, up 6 percent from one year ago.   These two states accounted for 62 percent of the total increase in the beef cow herd. Kansas and Missouri each accounted for about 10 percent of the cow herd increase meaning that those four states accounted for 82 percent of the total increase in beef cows.  The increase in Texas beef cow inventory was higher than expected because, despite improved conditions, significant areas of drought remain in the state.  There were some other surprising data in the report including the fact that California beef cow inventories were unchanged despite the severe drought in 2014, along with Oregon, which also experienced significant drought but had a 1.7 percent increase in the beef cow herd in the state.  The lack of growth in the Northern Plains was also somewhat surprising with decreased beef cow herds in North and South Dakota and a Nebraska beef cow herd unchanged from one year ago.

The inventory of beef replacement heifers was up 4 percent year over year indicating that further expansion is planned on the part of cow-calf producers.  January 1 beef replacement heifers, as a percent of the beef cow herd was a record 19.5 percent, indicating intensive heifer retention. Moreover, the calculated percent of heifers entering the herd in 2014 jumped 23 percent year over year; with those heifers entering the herd representing 96 percent of NASS reported heifers expected to calve in 2014.  Oklahoma beef replacement heifers were up 80,000 head, a 25 percent year over year increase, and accounted for 35 percent of the total increase in replacement heifers.  The beef replacement heifer increase of 8 percent in Texas and the 12 percent increase in South Dakota, were the second and third largest increases in absolute numbers and, when combined with Oklahoma, represent 75 percent of the total increase in beef replacement heifers.  Kansas also had an 8 percent year over year increase in beef replacement heifers.

15 US Cattle Invenntory

Source: National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS): http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/usda/current/Catt/Catt-01-30-2015.txt

This report does not change market fundamentals much, if any, in 2015.  The fact that there are more cows than expected does not change the timing of beef production in 2015.   The marginal increase in estimated feeder provides little relief to tight feeder numbers and may be offset with even more heifer retention and the possibility of smaller feeder cattle imports from Mexico and Canada this year.  The jump-start to herd expansion could shave a year off of the time needed for herd rebuilding, depending on herd expansion in 2015 and beyond.  In any event, herd expansion is expected to continue until late in the decade baring setbacks from drought.

 

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/02/07/us-beef-cow-herd-increased-2-in-2014/

2014 NASS Farm Land Rent & Labor Survey Summary

2014 NASS Farm Land Rent & Labor Survey Summary

Irrigated farm land rented for an average of $   per acre in the tri-states region in 2014

The annual USDA BASS Survey indicated that irrigated farm land rented for an average of $ 132 per acre in the tri-states region in 2014, which was $ 22/acre less than what was reported for 2013.

It is the time of year when land owners and farmers negotiate lease agreements for renting farm land. One of the toughest parts of negotiation is having a handle on what is a fair price.  The USDA National Agricultural Statistic Service (NASS) does an annual survey to estimate rental rates for a specific region.  The survey summary does not provide the range of rates paid, but does provide annual county average rates.  Not every county is surveyed each year, so it is helpful to look at the results from neighboring counties as well.

There are a number of factors that influence the rental value of farm land.  Certainly farm size, crop history, soil type, and location influence lease rates.  A large, 300 acre field would be more attractive to rent than 15 acres, or a farm next door more valuable than an operation 10 miles away.  While the NASS Survey Report only provides average prices, it does offer an unbiased place to start the negotiations.

The new Farm Bill programs, and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) Base Acreage associated with each farm, may also affect land rental value in the years ahead.  For example a farm with a large percentage of either peanut or generic (formerly cotton) base will be more attractive for peanut farming than land without base acreage that can be utilized with the new peanut program.

14 Non-irriagted rent

Table 1 Data provided by National Agricultural Statistics Service

Non-irrigted or dryland farm acres are commonly rented or leased in Northwest Florida.  Table 1 above shows the variation of average dryland farm rent by county, which ranged from $ 32/acre in Walton County to $ 88/acre in Santa Rosa and Escambia Counties.  Some counties have enough survey results to report individually, while others are grouped in a category called “other counties”.   The average rental rate for non-irrigated crop land in the Panhandle regions was $ 57/acre in 2014.

Table 2.  Data provided by National Agricultural Statistics Service

Table 2. Data provided by National Agricultural Statistics Service

Since there are not as many irrigated farms, NASS reports their survey results by region, instead of by county.  Irrigated crop land is generally more productive and certainly more consistent, so the lease rates are generally much higher per acre. Table 2 shows the variation in irrigated farm lease rates in the tri-states region, with an average of $ 132/acre for the area.

Table 3.  Data provided by National Agricultural Statistics Service

Table 3. Data provided by National Agricultural Statistics Service

Pasture lease rates are considerably lower than crop land, because livestock generate a much lower return per acre.  Table 3 illustrates the range of pasture rent from $ 23/acre in Holmes County to $ 36/acre in Washington County.  The average pasture rent for the Panhandle was $ 29.50/acre in 2014.

14 Avg Labor

Table 4. Data provided by National Agricultural Statistics Service

The other challenge that farmers and ranchers face is knowing what is a fair rate to pay their hired labor.  NASS only reports farm workers in general categories, so the averages provided in Table 4 may not fit specialized categories of workers.  NASS does not provide a regional or by county hired worker wage report, so this information came from across the state of Florida.

The USDA’s National Agricultural Statistic Services offers a wide range of additional information.  To look at the information provided in this article and other information from their surveys go to:  http://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/NASS Logo

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Jackson County Extension Director, Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/01/31/2014-nass-farm-land-rent-labor-survey-summary/

Panhandle Ag e-News 2014 Reader’s Choice Awards

2014 Reader's Choice AwardThe Panhandle Agriculture Extension Team thanks you for subscribing to Panhandle Ag e-News this past year.

2014 was an even more successful year for this electronic newsletter project. Our subscriber list increased from 2,775 at the beginning of 2014 to 3,393 in 2015 (22% growth).  Last year we had 68,571 total web page views as compared to 36,513 in 2013 (88% increase). Word is spreading and more and more farmers and ranchers are taking advantage of this service.

There were a total of 266 articles contributed by 36 County Agents and State Specialist authors in 2014. The following were the top 40 articles written in 2014.

  1. The Panhandle Ag Reader’s Choice Award goes to an article written by Doug Mayo, Jackson County Extension, that was published October 24, 2014, and was viewed 623 times in 2014.

    Understanding Your Forage Test Report

  2. In second place was an article written by Jed Dillard, Jefferson County Extension, with 612 views:

    Making the Best of a Bad Situation – Storing Large Round Hay Bales Outside

  3. The third most read article was written by Doug Mayo, Jackson County Extension, with 597 views:

    Complying with the New Florida Cattle ID Rule

  4. Honorable mention goes to an article written by Doug Mayo, Jackson County Extension with 592 views:

    What is the Best Grass for Pastures in the Panhandle?

     

  5. The Limited Poultry and Egg Farm Operation Rule Becomes Effective July 1, 2014

  6. Large Carpenter Bee Management and Control

  7. Celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the US Extension Service

  8. Pigweed Suppression Using a Ryegrass Cover Crop

  9. History of Snowfall in North Florida

  10. Chikungunya Arbovirus – A New Mosquito Borne Illness in Florida

  11. Scout Pastures for Toxic Perilla Mint this Fall

  12. What Does the Launch of New Generic Fungicides Mean for Plant Disease Management?

  13. Herbicide Alternatives for Prickly Pear and Dogfennel without Cleanwave

  14. Oriental Persimmons Varieties for North Florida

  15. Satsuma Protection in Cold Weather Extremes

  16. Tips for Controlling Armyworms in Hay Fields

  17. Vaseygrass in your Bermuda hayfield? Start your management now!

  18. Are You Getting Your Money’s Worth from Your Hay?

  19. Vaseygrass Becoming a Common Sight, Unfortunately

  20. New University of Florida Peanut Varieties for 2014

  21. Manage Honey Bees Now to Prepare for Next Year’s Nectar Flow

  22. Goatweed Spreading West: Found in Holmes County Pastures

  23. It’s in Florida: Rose Rosette Virus, a Devastating Disease on Roses

  24. USDA Microloans Available for Small Farms

  25. Start Preparing for Winter Pastures

  26. Sesame Production: A New Crop for Florida

  27. Temporary Pastures Can Hide Ugly Surprises

  28. Thistle Control in Pastures

  29. A New Chestnut Trial Planned for NFREC-Quincy

  30. UF/IFAS Strip Till Cotton Variety Test Results

  31. Panhandle Farm Facts from the 2012 Census of Agriculture

  32. Spring Appearance of Ground Bees

  33. Florida Food Connect: A Tool to Help Producers Engage with Customers

  34. Managing Aquatic Plants in Farm Ponds

  35. Make the Most of Your Pond This Year!

  36. Western Flower Thrips Develop Insecticide Resistance in North Florida

  37. Yellowing in Peanuts Due to Manganese Deficiency

  38. 2014 Row Crop Comparison Tools and Budgets

  39. When Should I Thin My Pine Trees?

  40. Watermelon Novel Bacterial Leaf Spot Research Update

 

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/01/17/panhandle-ag-e-news-2014-readers-choice-awards/

2014 Weather Summary and 1st Quarter Outlook

National Weather Service estimates for rainfall in the Florida Panhandle for December 2014.

National Weather Service estimates for rainfall in the Florida Panhandle for December 2014.

December was another wet month for the Central Panhandle, with more moderate rainfall recorded in the western counties.  Gadsden and Liberty County received heavy rains just prior to Christmas, with a monthly total over 10″.

14 Panhandle FAWN Station SummaryThe Florida Automated Weather Stations (FAWN) showed this variation in December rainfall as well.  The FAWN station located at the Quincy NFREC recorded 10.7″  in December, DeFuniak had 9.5″, and 8.4″ in Monteicello.  The driest location was Carrabelle where only 2.4″ was recorded. For the entire year, all six locations were well above average.  The Quincy station recorded 16.1″ above average rainfall, followed by the Jay location, which was 13.2″ more than normal.  The DeFuniak station recorded 82.9″ in 2014.  This station was recently added, so a historic average has not yet been determined for this location yet, but it was clearly much higher than normal.

2014 rainfall totals recorded at the six FAWN stations in the Panhandle.

2014 rainfall totals recorded at the six FAWN stations in the Panhandle.

Comparing the total rainfall for the six FAWN stations shows the variation that occurred in 2014. The Marianna station recorded the lowest total rainfall in 2014, but even it was almost 8″ above average. All six stations averaged almost 70″ for the year.

14 Marianna FAWN Rainfall vs avg graphTotal rainfall amounts don’t tell the whole story, because there were large sections of the Panhandle in slight to moderate drought through the summer months, when crops needed rainfall the most.  2014 was indeed a strange year, with so much rain over the spring and early winter.  The graph above shows rainfall in 2014 (blue line) as compared to the historic average (grey line) at the Marianna station.  Whille the 62″ total rainfall figure is impressive, the June and early July drought hurt crop yields.

12-31-14 FL Drough MonitorEven with the late fall and early winter rains, the western counties in the Panhandle are still included in the Drought Monitor with abnormally dry and moderate drought conditions being reported.

2014 Marianna FAWN SummaryNot only has it been a year with high spring and early winter rainfall, but temperatures have been cool as well.  The weather summary above from the Marianna FAWN station shows the while air temperatures were slightly warmer in December than November, the soil continued to cool below an average of 50°for the fist time since February.  This station recorded 24 days of below freezing air temperatures, compared to only 14 in 2013, 16 in 2012, and  21 in 2011.  Even so it did not compare to the 51 days below freezing back in 2010.  That same year there were also 83 days over 95° as compared to only 4 in 2014.

To see the entire daily weather summary, as well as the 62 years of monthly rainfall records at the Marianna station, download the:

2014 Jackson Co Weather Summary

 

15 Jan-Mar Temp OutlookSo what can we expect in 2015?  The National Weather Services three month outlook for January through March is predicting cooler than normal and wetter than normal conditions in the Southeast.

15 Jan-Mar Precip OutlookIt certainly does appear that the weak El Niño climate forecast is going to continue to influence weather in the region.

2015 US Seasonal Drought OutlookMuch of the drought regions of the country are expected to get some relief this winter.  If their forecast holds true, much of the Southeast should be in good shape for crop planting later this year.

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Jackson County Extension Director, Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/01/10/2014-weather-summary-and-1st-quarter-outlook/

2014 UF Peanut Variety Test Results

2014 UF Peanut Variety Test Results

Dr. Barry Tillman, NFREC Peanut Breeder, shared the  results of his work with the newer peanut variates.  Photo credit Doug Mayo

Dr. Barry Tillman, UF/IFAS Peanut Breeder, showed growers the newer peanut varieties at the 2014 Peanut Field Day. Photo credit Doug Mayo

Peanut planting season is months away, but it’s not too early to begin choosing varieties to plant. The 2014 variety performance data is hot off the press and can provide a tool to compare and contrast peanut varieties. Table 1 presents the University of Florida peanut variety performance from 2011 through 2014 for pod yield and grade (TSMK = Total Sound Mature Kernels). Yields and grades among the varieties can be compared within a column for one, two, three and four years. The three and four year averages are the best indication of long-term performance.

This chart has several new varieties including TUFRunnerTM ‘297’ and TUFRunnerTM ‘511’, two new high oleic, large seeded runners from the University of Florida and Georgia-12Y (normal oleic) and Georgia-13M (high oleic) from the University of Georgia. In general, there are many very good peanut varieties to choose from based on yield and grade. There are other important factors to consider, especially in an era of low prices where small benefits can add up over the farm.

Seed size varies greatly among these varieties with FloRunTM ‘107’, Georgia-09B, and Georgia Greener and Georgia-13M having the smallest seed (more seed per pound).   Compared to planting varieties with larger seed such as Georgia-06G or Florida-07, planting costs can be reduced by planting one of the smaller-seeded varieties. Disease resistance is also an important factor in comparing varieties. Those with good resistance to leaf spots and white mold such as TUFRunnerTM ‘727’, Tifguard, and Georgia-12Y can produce well even when sprayed with the less expensive, protective fungicides such as chlorothalnil (Bravo and other generics) and tebuconazole (Folicur and other generics). Other varieties with more susceptibility to leaf spot and/or white mold will likely benefit from fungicides with better disease control attributes which are also more expensive. Note also that there are seven high oleic varieties, the first time that the majority of the varieties in the UF test were high oleic. Over the past two years, some contract premiums have been offered for high oleic production.Tillman- 2014 FL Peanut Vaiety Test Results

For more information on growing peanuts, please see the following UF/IFAS Publications:

Peanut Production

 

PG

Author: btillman – btillman@ufl.edu

btillman

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/01/10/2014-uf-peanut-variety-test-results/

2014 Farm Bill Provides Greater Protection for Specialty Crop Growers

2014 Farm Bill Provides Greater Protection for Specialty Crop Growers

USDA FSA BulletinSource: USDA Farm Service Agency

Greater protection is now available from the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP)  for crops that traditionally have been ineligible for federal crop insurance. The new options, created by the 2014 Farm Bill, provide greater coverage for losses when natural disasters affect specialty crops such as vegetables, fruits, mushrooms, floriculture, ornamental nursery, aquaculture, turf grass, ginseng, honey, syrup, and energy crops.

Previously, the program offered coverage at 55 percent of the average market price for crop losses that exceed 50 percent of expected production. Producers can now choose higher levels of coverage, up to 65 percent of their expected production at 100 percent of the average market price. 

The expanded protection will be especially helpful to beginning and traditionally underserved producers, as well as farmers with limited resources, who will receive fee waivers and premium reductions for expanded coverage. More crops are now eligible for the program, including expanded aquaculture production practices, and sweet and biomass sorghum. For the first time, a range of crops used to produce bioenergy will be eligible as well.  

To help producers learn more about the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program and how it can help them, USDA, in partnership with Michigan State University and the University of Illinois, created an online resource. The Web tool, available at www.fsa.usda.gov/nap, allows producers to determine whether their crops are eligible for coverage. It also gives them an opportunity to explore a variety of options and levels to determine the best protection level for their operation.

If the application deadline for an eligible crop has already passed, producers will have until Jan. 14, 2015, to choose expanded coverage through the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program. To learn more, visit the Farm Service Agency (FSA) website at www.fsa.usda.gov/nap or contact your local FSA office at offices.usda.gov. The Farm Service Agency (FSA), which administers the program, also wants to hear from producers and other interested stakeholders who may have suggestions or recommendations on the program. Written comments will be accepted until Feb. 13, 2015 and can be submitted through www.regulations.gov.

For Questions?
Please contact your local FSA Office.

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/12/20/2014-farm-bill-provides-greater-protection-for-specialty-crop-growers/

November 2014 Panhandle Weather Summary

Source:

Much of the Southeast was 4-8 degrees colder than normal for November.

Cold weather came early to the Panhandle this year.

Fawn station low temperatures for Wednesday, November 19.

Fawn station low temperatures for Wednesday, November 19.

Frost around Thanksgiving is not that unusual, but a hard freeze came on November 19th, and set record lows for the area.  Satsuma citrus fruit that had not been harvested was damaged by this early freeze, and perennial pastures went completely dormant somewhat early this winter.

14 Marianna Jan-Nov weather summaryAverage air temperatures dropped 15 degrees, and average soil temperatures dropped 14 degrees in November compared to October.  It seems winter has set in early this year.

National weather Service estimates for November 2014 Rainfall.

National weather Service estimates for November 2014 Rainfall.

The weak El Niño apparently has affected the Panhandle in November, providing wetter than normal conditions for the central and eastern Panhandle.  Even so the rainfall was not even, with the western counties receiving less than 2″ of rainfall while a large portion in red above received 5-8″ in November.

Dec 9 14 FL Drought MonitorThis extra rainfall did ease some of the drought conditions in the region, but the latest Drought Monitor graphic shows that large sections of the Panhandle still remain abnormally dry.

14 FAWN Panhandle Rainfall Jan-NovThe UF/IFAS Florida Automated Weather Stations (FAWN) also showed the variation in rainfall for the month of November.  The Marianna FAWN station recorded 5.9 inches of rain in November, while Jay the dry spot with only 1.9″.  The average for all six stations was 4.4″.

Jan-Nov 2014 FAWN rainfall totalsFor the year, however, the western stations in Jay and DeFuniak have recorded the highest totals in 2014.  All six stations have averaged almost 63″ in 2014, but there is considerable variation from 54″ to 73″.

15 Dec-Feb Temp OutlookThe NOAA outlook for December through February is predicting cooler than normal temperatures.

15 Dec-Feb Precip OutlookNOAA is also expecting above average rainfall over the next three months. Hopefully there will be continued drought relief for the Southeast in the coming months.

 

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Jackson County Extension Director, Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/12/13/november-2014-panhandle-weather-summary/

2014 Gadsden Tomato Forum

tomatos2014 Gadsden Tomato Forum

December 4, 2014

North Florida Research & Education Center – Quincy, Florida

UF IFAS Ext 2013 Hosted by the Gadsden County Extension Service

Agenda:

Presiding: Dr. Henry G. Grant, County Extension Director, UF/IFAS, Gadsden County, FL

A.M.  (Eastern Standard Time)

8:00 Registration & Coffee

8:15 Opening Remarks: Dr. Nicholas Cumberford, Director, UF/IFAS, North Florida Research and Education Center

Moderator – Rome Ethredge, County Extension Coordinator, UGA, Seminole County , GA

8:30 Variety Trials and Fumigant Research Update: Dr. Joshua H. Freeman Vegetable Specialist, University of Florida/IFAS NFREC

9:15 Recall and Trace Back: Erin Holliman, Food Safety Specialist, Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Association

10:00 Target Spot Management Options and Tomato Diseases Trials Update: Dr. Mathews Paret, Plant Pathologist, University of Florida/IFAS NFREC

10:45 Break: Moderator – Justin Ballew, County Extension Coordinator, UGA, Decatur County, GA

11:00 Necessary Requirements for Growers to Successfully Use The H-2 A Program; Mike Carlton, Director of Labor Relations, Florida Fruit And Vegetable Association

11:45 Spider Mite Management Options: Dr. Hugh Smith, Entomology and Nematology Specialist, Gulf Coast Research and Education Center- Balm

P.M.
12:30 Introduction To The 2015 Whole Farm Revenue Protection (WFRP) Policy: Tymothy McGuire, Risk Management Specialist, USDA

1:15 Q & A and Sponsors Presentation

1:45 LUNCH

2:30 Annual Meeting of the Gadsden Tomato Growers Assoc., Inc. and the Quincy Tomato Growers Exchange.

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Please see the following printable flyer for more details:  2014 Gadsden Tomato Forum Program

As always, we thank our sponsors and clientele for your continued support of our educational programs.

Tomato

 

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/11/21/2014-gadsden-tomato-forum/

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