Tag Archive: August

August Weather Summary & Harvest Outlook

August Weather Summary & Harvest Outlook

August was another rainy month across the Panhandle, but there was a wide variation in rainfall across the region.  The western counties had large areas with 10-15 inches (hot pink) and even some areas nearer to the coast with more than 15″.  The eastern counties were much drier, except along the coast with a range of 5-10″ (red), but there were isolated locations that had less than 5″ (tan).  As hard as it may be for farmers in Escambia, or Santa Rosa to believe, it got pretty dry in parts of Leon and Gadsden Counties in August.Florida showed up for the first time since June 20 in the U.S. Drought Monitor.  Quite a number of Southwest Georgia counties just to the north of Gadsden and Leon were moved into the Abnormally dry category at the end of August.

FAWN Weather Summary

The Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN) stations also showed the variation in rainfall for the month of August.  The highest rainfall total was recorded in Jay with 9.6″ in August, with DeFuniak recording 9.5″.  Marianna was the driest location with only 4.5″.  Only the Marianna station recorded less than historic average for the month of August.  The average for all six stations was 8.0″ in August.

Through the first eight months, the Jay station has recorded 52.5″ in 2017, while only 33.9″ were recorded in Monticello.  All six stations averaged 43.5″ thus far for the year.  For the year, both Quincy and Monticello have recorded less than historic average for the first eight months of the year.  The Monticello location is 8.4″ below historic average for rainfall.

Soil temperatures heated up by one degree from an average of 87° in July to 88° in August.  The average air temperature held at 80°.  The high for the month was 96° on August 20 and 25, with the low of 62° on August 1. For daily temperature and rainfall records, Use the following link:  2017 Jan-Aug Weather Summary

Harvest Weather Outlook

The Climate Prediction Center is expecting above average temperatures and rainfall from September through November.  The latest projections call for 73% chance of warmer than normal temperatures and a 66% chance of higher than normal rainfall over the next three months.  It does not appear that the perfect harvest experienced in 2016 will return in 2017, but rainfall during this three-month period is historically lower than other months.  Certainly everyone needs to pay close attention to the tropics.  A major storm the size of Hurricane Irma could wreak havoc on peanut and cotton harvest for a large area.

ENSO Phase Outlook

The Climate Prediction Center is pretty clear in their forecast that they do not expect an El Niño this winter.  Neutral conditions currently exist and should continue.  Here is an excerpt from their latest ENSO phase outlook:

ENSO-Neutral conditions are present. Equatorial sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are near-to-below average across the central and eastern Pacific Ocean. ENSO-Neutral is favored (~85% chance during Jul-Sep, decreasing to ~55% during Dec-Feb) through the Northern Hemisphere winter 2017-18  Climate Prediction Center

So what does this forecast mean for area farmers?  Forecasters are not expecting influence from Pacific Ocean winds and weather to affect the US this fall and winter.  Farmers planning for cool-season crops can expect normal rainfall with no influence from Pacific Ocean ENSO phases.  If you go back in history, however, you will see that many of the ENSO neutral years were the ones with the hardest freezes and lowest temperatures.   In the end it is expected to be a normal winter, but what is normal lately?  It has been a number of years since there has been a normal weather in the Panhandle of Florida.  Maybe 2017-18 will get cold enough to reduce populations of whiteflies and other pests.

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/08/august-weather-summary-harvest-outlook/

WFREC Row Crop Field Day – August 22

WFREC Row Crop Field Day – August 22

Photo Credit John Atkins

Please join us on Tuesday, August 22, 2017 from 8:00 AM – 1:30 PM central time for the annual Extension Farm Field Day at  the West Florida Research & Education Center (WFREC) at the Jay Research Facility (4253 Experiment Road, Hwy 182, Jay FL 32565).

The following topics will be covered:

  • Cotton Varieties

  • Fertility Management in Cotton and Peanuts

  • Auxin Herbicide Usage and Weed Control Update in Cotton and Peanuts

  • Caterpillars in Field Crops – What You Need to Know

  • A New Sprayer Design for White Mold Control

  • Soybean Varieties

  • Managing Peanut Varieties

  • Peanut Diseases

  • Disease Resistant Management

The field day, breakfast, and lunch are free due to the generosity of our sponsors.  There will be Pesticide License CEUs available:  1 Core and 5 category in Private, Row Crop, Demo and Research.  If you are in need of CEUs, this is a great opportunity.

 

 

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Author: Libbie Johnson – libbiej@ufl.edu

Agriculture agent at UF IFAS Escambia County Extension.
http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/

Libbie Johnson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/19/wfrec-row-crop-field-day-august-22/

Beekeeping in the Panhandle Summer Series – Starts August 17th

Beekeeping in the Panhandle Summer Series – Starts August 17th

European Honey Bees
Photo: Ashley N. Mortensen; University of Florida

The UF/IFAS Extension Panhandle Agriculture Team is pleased to offer three intermediate level beekeeping classes.  These classes will be offered via interactive web-conferencing at a number of Extension Offices across North Florida and will be taught by state and nationally recognized specialists.  This summer series will be Thursday evenings from 6-7:30 pm Central Time, 7-8:30 pm Eastern Time.  Each presentation will be followed by a question / answer period with the speaker.  Registration for all three classes is $ 15 per person, or $ 25 for a family up to four, and covers course materials and refreshments. 

Here is the lineup:

Thursday August 17th, Fall Pest and Disease Management -Varroa Mites and Nosema presented by Cameron Jack, UF/IFAS Bee Lab Apiarist

Thursday August 24th, Working With Pollination Contracts, presented by Jeanette Klopchin, FDACS Bureau of Plant and Apiary Inspection

Thursday September 7th, Minimizing Honey Bee Exposure to Pesticides, presented by Jeanette Klopchin, FDACS Bureau of Plant and Apiary Inspection.

Here is a link to a printable flyer and further details: Beekeeping in Panhandle Summer Series 2017. 

Please call your local UF/IFAS Extension Office to register.

Call and register today!

 

PG

Author: Judy Biss – judy.biss@ufl.edu

Judy Biss is the Agriculture and Natural Resource Agent in Calhoun County, Florida

Judy Biss

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/11/beekeeping-in-the-panhandle-summer-series-starts-august-17th-2/

August 8 : Sneak some zucchini on your neighbor’s porch day!

Can you believe it is that time of year already to sneak some zucchini on your neighbor’s porch! Honestly, it is a day to celebrate. And celebrate we should! It is the lucky neighbor who profits from the gardeners abundant harvest. Nonetheless, what can one do with all that zucchini?

The late, Julia Child bestows the virtue of ratatouille in many of her books yet it seemed to take an animated rat in the award winning Pixar film to suggest ratatouille might be something to try. Really! Ratatouille, a traditional French Provençal stewed vegetable dish, originating in Nice is a mostly Mediterranean fare, however, we too have all the local produce to adapt this delicious dish.

How? What do you need? Ratatouille can be made just the way you like it but start with the basics: onions, eggplant, zucchini, garlic, tomatoes, red, green or yellow peppers, mushrooms, and fresh or dried herbs and a pinch of salt and pepper.

Ratatouille is typically served as a side dish, but may also be served as a vegetable soup, or a meal on its own accompanied by pasta, rice or bread. Ratatouille is good as a topping for your favorite grilled meat or fish, or as a filling in a simple omelet. Did I mention it can be added to quiche? Or stuffed into a pita pocket?

There is as much deliberation on how to make a traditional ratatouille as there is about how you eat it. Do you layer it and bake it? Is it sautéed? Is it simmered? Is it eaten as a side dish, a main dish or a sandwich filling? I’ve tried them all and even found success using a slow-cooker.

Try your hand at this simple yet elegantly adaptable vegetable dish.

The provided very basic recipe can be adapted to suit your personal/regional taste. Don’t like eggplant? Leave it out! Have a lot of okra or yellow squash? Add it! Like olives, nuts or raisins? Add them to your portion. Rather not use vegetable oil? Don’t! Want to cover it in your favorite spicy olive oil? Do you have some extra zucchini? I think you get the picture.

Ratatouille does not have to look like the vibrant Pixar version yet, it is still going to garner up gracious comments and acknowledgements from those you love and cook for. Whip up your version to savor today!

Ratatouille

Ingredients:

2 Tablespoons any kind of oil

4 medium onions, chopped – any color, any kind

2 medium eggplant, cut into 3/4-inch cubes

4 garlic cloves, minced

6 medium zucchini, cut into 1-inch cubes

2 large green, red or yellow bell pepper seeded and cut in 1” cubes

8 to 10 ripe tomatoes, peeled, seeded coarsely chopped (or use a can of fire roasted diced tomatoes)

3 fresh thyme sprigs (or to taste)

1 fresh rosemary sprig (or to taste)

1 dried or two fresh bay leaves

1/2 tsp. salt

1/2 tsp. freshly ground pepper

 

Directions:

In a BIG pot over medium heat, warm the oil. When it is hot, reduce the heat to medium, add the onions and sauté until translucent, about 2 minutes. Add the eggplant and garlic and sauté, stirring often, until the eggplant cubes are slightly softened, 3 to 4 minutes.

Add the zucchini and bell pepper and sauté, stirring and turning, until softened, 4 to 5 minutes more. Add the tomatoes, thyme, rosemary, bay leaf, salt and pepper, and stir and turn for 2 to 3 minutes more.

Cover, reduce the heat to low and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are soft and have somewhat blended together, about 60 minutes. (slow cooker at least 4 hours on high)

Remove from heat. Garnish with minced fresh basil. Transfer to a serving bowl and serve hot, at room temperature or cold. Serves at least 10.

PG

Author: Heidi Copeland – hbc@ufl.edu

Family and Consumer Sciences Extension Agent, Leon County Florida Educational Program Focus: •Food, Nutrition and Wellness •Child Development and Parenting
http:leon.ifas.edu

Heidi Copeland

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/07/august-8-sneak-some-zucchini-on-your-neighbors-porch-day/

Keep an Eye on Your Eye Health – August is National Eye Exam Month

Most of us are willing to go to the doctor or the dentist, which are both part of taking care of our health. However, do you go to the eye doctor? If not, you definitely should add it to your healthy lifestyle regime. Eye exams at every age and stage of life can help you keep your vision strong. August is National Eye Exam month; this is the perfect reminder to schedule a comprehensive eye exam.

The Vision Council of America reports that 12.2 million Americans require some sort of vision correction, but do not use any. Nearly 50% of parents with children under 12 have never taken their children to an eye-care professional.

Many people think their eyesight is just fine, but then they get that first pair of glasses or contact lenses and the world becomes much clearer – everything from fine print to street signs. Improving and/or maintaining your eyesight is important – about 11 million Americans over age 12 need vision correction, but that is just one of the reasons to get your eyes examined. Regular eye exams are also an important part of finding eye diseases early and preserving your vision.

Eye diseases are common and can go unnoticed for a long time. Some diseases have no symptoms at first. A comprehensive dilated eye exam by an optometrist (a medical professional with a focus on regular vision care who can prescribe eyeglasses and contacts) or ophthalmologist (a medical eye doctor with a focus on the complete eye health) is necessary to find eye diseases in the early stages when treatment to prevent vision loss is most effective. During the exam, visual acuity (sharpness), depth perception, eye alignment, and eye movement are tested. Eye drops are used to make your pupils larger so your eye doctor can see inside your eyes and check for signs of health problems.

How often should you have an eye exam?

  • A child’s eyes should be checked regularly by an eye doctor or pediatrician. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends vision screening for all children at least once between age 3 and 5 years to detect amblyopia or risk factors for the disease. Amblyopia is when the vision in one of the eyes is reduced because the eye and the brain are not working together properly. The eye itself looks normal, but it is not being used normally because the brain is favoring the other eye. This condition is sometimes called lazy eye.
  • People with diabetes should have a dilated eye exam every year.
  • People with a family history of glaucoma should have an eye exam every year.
  • Adults with good health should have an eye exam at least every 2 years.

Some people are at higher risk for glaucoma and should have a dilated eye exam every 1 to 2 years:

  • African Americans, ages 40 years and older.
  • Everyone older than age 60, especially Mexican Americans.
  • People with a family history of glaucoma.

Early treatment is critically important to prevent some common eye diseases from causing permanent vision loss or blindness:

  •  Cataracts (clouding of the lens), the leading cause of vision loss in the United States.
  • Diabetic retinopathy (causes damage to blood vessels in the back of the eye), the leading cause of blindness in American adults.
  • Glaucoma (a group of diseases that damages the optic nerve).
  • Age-related macular degeneration (gradual breakdown of light-sensitive tissue in the eye).

Other reasons to see your eye doctor: If you have any of the following eye problems, do not wait for your next appointment, schedule your eye appointment as soon as possible:

  • Decreased vision
  • Draining or redness of the eye
  • Eye pain
  • Double vision
  • Diabetes
  • Floaters (tiny specks that appear to float before your eyes)
  • Halos around lights
  • Flashes of light.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 10 Tips to Protect Your Vision:

  1. Get a regular comprehensive dilated eye exam.
  2. Know your family’s eye health history.
  3. Eat right to protect your sight. You have heard that carrots are good for your eyes. But eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables—particularly dark leafy greens, such as spinach, kale, or collard greens—is important for keeping your eyes healthy, too.
  4. Maintain a healthy weight.
  5. Wear protective eyewear when playing sports or doing activities around the home. Protective eyewear includes safety glasses and goggles, safety shields, and eye guards specially designed to provide the correct protection.
  6. Be cool and wear your shades. Wear sunglasses that block out 99% to 100% of UV-A and UV-B radiation (the sun’s rays).
  7. Give your eyes a rest. If you spend a lot of time at the computer or focusing on any one thing, you sometimes forget to blink and your eyes can get fatigued. Try the 20-20-20 rule: Every 20 minutes, look away about 20 feet in front of you for 20 seconds. This short exercise can help reduce eyestrain.
  8. Clean your hands and your contact lenses properly.
  9. Practice workplace eye safety.
  10. Quit smoking or never start.

Of the estimated 61 million US adults at high risk for vision loss, only half visited an eye doctor last year. Regular eye care can have a life-changing impact on preserving the vision of millions of people. Be sure to make your eye health a priority in your life. Healthy eyes lead to better vision and an overall better quality of life.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Sources: Vision Council of America  https://www.thevisioncouncil.org/      Center for Disease Control and Prevention    https://www.cdc.gov/

 

PG

Author: Melanie Taylor – metaylor@ufl.edu

Melanie Taylor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/05/keep-an-eye-on-your-eye-health-august-is-national-eye-exam-month/

August Cattle & Forage Management Reminders

August Cattle & Forage Management Reminders

UF/IFAS Beef Cattle & Forage Specialists, and County Extension Agents serving the Florida Panhandle worked to develop a basic management calendar for cattle producers.  The purpose of this calendar is to provide reminders for management techniques with similar timing to those used at the North Florida Research and Education Center’s Beef Unit, near Marianna, Florida.  Links to useful publications with more information are also provided.

USDA Ear TagsAugust Management Reminders

Cattle Herd Management

  • Sort pregnant cows into breeding herds by age and body condition score (thin vs. fat)
  • Check mineral feeders

Pasture Management

  • Harvest bahiagrass seed from pastures set aside for late seed production

Pest Management

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Use the following link to download the entire Cattle & Forage Management Annual Calendar:

Panhandle Ag Extension Team Cattle & Forage Management Calendar

Developed by the Panhandle Agriculture Extension Livestock and Forage Team:

Doug Mayo, Cliff Lamb, Mark Mauldin, Ann Blount, Cheryl Mackowiak, Jose Dubeux, Jay Ferrell, Jennifer Bearden, NicolasDiLorenzo, Shep Eubanks, Jed Dillard, Mike Goodchild, Roy Carter, Henry Carter, John Atkins, Kalyn Waters, and Ray Bodrey.
PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/05/august-cattle-forage-management-reminders-2/

July Weather Summary and August Outlook

July Weather Summary and August Outlook

National Weather Service estimates of rainfall in July 2017 across the Panhandle.

Rainfall

July was more typical than the previous month with scattered summer showers that were anything but uniform.  For the most part, coastal areas received higher totals than further inland.  While there were isolated areas in hot pink that received over 10″ for the month, most of the region ranged from 3-8″.

The six Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN) stations also recorded considerable variation in rainfall totals.  The wettest location was in Marianna, with 6.8″, while only 2.5″ were recorded in Jay.  The Marianna station was the only one that recorded above historic average for the location in July.  For the year, the six station average of 35.5″ is right at the historic average for all six locations.  Only the Monticello and Quincy stations have recorded less than historic average through the first seven months.  The Jay station still has the highest yearly total with 42.9″, and the Monticello station the lowest total of only 26.9″.

Temperature

Temperatures certainly heated up in July with five days reaching a high of 94° (July 4,5,6,20,& 21).  The cold front that passed through at the close of the month cooled things off with the low of 67° on July 31.  The average air temperature rose three degrees from 77° in June to 80° in July, and the average soil temperature rose five degrees from 82° to 87°.

For a daily summary of temperatures and rainfall, use the following link: 17 Jan-July Jackson County Weather Summary

August Outlook

The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) is expecting the warming trend to continue in August with higher than normal temperatures for this region.  Normal rainfall is expected for the month.

ENSO Alert

CPC forecasters are still expecting a neutral winter, but there is still a chance of an El Nino (35-40%).  It is still too early to call it yet, so we will have to wait to find out.  At this point, farmers and ranchers should plan on a normal rainfall for their cool-season crops.

Neutral conditions are present. Equatorial sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are near-to-above average across the central and east-central Pacific Ocean. ENSO-Neutral is favored (50 to ~55% chance) into the Northern Hemisphere winter 2017-18.  Climate Prediction Center
PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/05/july-weather-summary-and-august-outlook/

Moisture Monitoring, Cover Crops, and Best Management Practices Field Day – August 10

Moisture Monitoring, Cover Crops, and Best Management Practices Field Day – August 10

Please join us on the morning of August 10th for a Moisture Monitoring, Cover Crops, and Best Management Practices Field Day hosted by UF/IFAS Santa Rosa Extension.  The event will take place from 8:00 am to 9:30 at Mickey Diamond’s Farm: 3270 Scarborough Road near Jay, Florida.

The following topics will be covered:

  • Soil Moisture Sensor Project Overview and Results

  • Benefits of Soil Moisture Probes

  • Use of small grains, legumes, and mixtures as cover crops

  • Using a summer legume after corn

  • Benefits of cover Crops

  • Estimation of Fall 2017 costs for installation of cover crops

  • Best Management Practices

  • Nutrient availability of legumes for future crops

  • On-farm management of cover crops

  • Explanation of crimper/roller to terminate winter cover

  • Demonstration of petiole sap testing of cotton and other crops

Need more information?  Contact Libbie Johnson at 850-475-5230 or by email at libbiej@ufl.edu.

PG

Author: Libbie Johnson – libbiej@ufl.edu

Agriculture agent at UF IFAS Escambia County Extension.
http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/

Libbie Johnson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/04/moisture-monitoring-cover-crops-and-best-management-practices-field-day-august-10/

Certified Pile Burner Course – August 30 & September 13

Certified Pile Burner Course – August 30 & September 13

The Florida Forest Service (FFS) and UF/IFAS Extension Service will be conducting a Certified Pile Burners Course on Wednesday, August 30 in Milton, and Wednesday, September 13, 2017 in Marianna and in Madison, FL.  (This course is also being offered in other areas of the state.  Check the website for the closest training to your location:  FFS Training Scheudule).  .  This training will be held from 8:30 am till 4:30 pm local time at the County Extension Office in all three locations.  Lunch will be provided with the training.  Fill out the registration form for the location of choice below and return as directed.

Don’t wait to register!  The number of training opportunities offered, and attendance at each individual  training is LIMITED.  The first fifty individuals to complete the requirements will be registered; there will be a 7-day non refundable fee limit.  If you do not make the training, and did not contact the hosting office at least one week before the class, you will not receive a refund.  There will be a test at the end of the session.  You must receive a grade of 70% or higher on the exam and demonstrate a proper pile burn with your local FFS office to become certified.  Once you are certified it will be noted with your customer number, thus it is important for us to have the proper number.  If you do not have a customer number, the FFS office in Bonifay will set one up for you:  850-373-1801.

This course will show you how to burn piles legally, safely and efficientlyMost importantly, it could save a life.  If you burn piles regularly, don’t put off registering for this training.  When the weather is dry, certified pile burners will receive priority for authorization to burn.  Also, certified pile burners are allowed to burn up to two hours longer per day and get multiple day authorizations.

Topics to be covered:
  1. Fire Weather
  2. Smoke Management
  3. Open Burning Regulations
  4. Pile Burn Planning and Implementation
  5. Safety
  6. Public Relations
  7. Pile Burner Certification Test        Please bring a Pencil for the Exam!

Download the Registration Packet for the location nearest you:

Milton – Santa Rosa Co. Pile Burner Course Registration Packet – August 30

Marianna Jackson Co. Pile Burner Course Registration Packet – September 13

Madison – Madison Co. Pile Burner Course Registration Packet – September 13

Frequently Asked Questions about Florida’s Certified Pile Burner Training

Q: Why should I be a certified pile burner?
A: Certified pile burners are trained to burn piles legally, safely and efficiently. Most importantly, it could save a life. Also, when the weather is dry, certified pile burners will receive priority for authorization to burn by the Florida Forest Service (FFS).  Also, certified pile burners are allowed to burn up to two hours longer per day and get multiple day authorizations.
 —
Q: What is a Pile Burner Customer Number?
A: When you call the FFS for an authorization to burn, you will be assigned a personal customer number. This number references your information so it doesn’t need to be gathered each time you call for an authorization. You must have your individual FFS customer number in order to be certified.
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Q: Is there a test?
A: Yes, the test is 20 questions and open-book. You must receive a score of at least 70% to pass.
  —
Q: What if I don’t pass?
A: Very few people fail the test, but if you do, you will be provided another opportunity to take the test at a later date. If you fail the second time, you must re-register and take the training again.
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Q: Why do you ask for my email on the application form?
A: Email is the fastest and most convenient method to inform registrants of their registration status. If no email address is provided then all correspondence will be sent through the federal mail. This can take several days to relay messages and this may not be practical if changes are made to the course schedule or for last minute registrations.
  —
Q: How much does it cost to register for the training?
A: Registration for the training is $ 50 per person and includes lunch, training materials and testing.
  —
Q: How long does my certification last, and how long do I have to complete the certification from the time I finish the class?
A: As long as the person with the certification uses their number at least 5 times in a period of 5 years their certification will not expire under the current program. You MUST complete the certification burn within a year of taking the class.
  —
Q: Will certified burners be notified if their certification expires?
A: Yes, notification will be sent out to them to let them know of their upcoming certification expiration date.
  —
Q: Will I be certified at the end of the one day training?
A: No, you will need to follow the written instructions that you will receive from the FFS to become certified. You will need to complete a simple burn plan, have it reviewed and approved locally by the FFS and also have the burn itself reviewed and approved by the FFS.
  —
Q: Is there a minimum age to be a certified pile burner?
A: Yes, you must be at least 18 years old to take the test and be a certified pile burner.
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PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/04/certified-pile-burner-course-august-30-september-13/

Gardening in Containers Workshop – August 19

The Jackson County Master Gardeners will host a “Gardening in Containers” Workshop on Saturday, August 19 from 9 AM to 2 PM at the Jackson County Extension Office, 2741 Penn Ave., Marianna, FL.  The workshop will give you simple tips on growing vegetables, herbs, and flowers in containers.  Bring your own unique container.  Plant material and soil will be provided.  The workshop is $ 25 and includes a home cooked lunch.  Please see the flyer below for more details and call 850-482-9620 to pre-register.

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Author: Matt Lollar – mlollar@ufl.edu

Matt Lollar is the Jackson County Horticulture Agent. He has 5 years of experience with University of Florida/IFAS Extension and he began his career in Sanford, FL as the Seminole County Horticulture Agent. Matt is originally from Belle Fontaine, AL. He earned his MS and BS degrees in Horticulture Production from Auburn University.

Matt Lollar

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/01/gardening-in-containers-workshop-august-19/

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