Tag Archive: Bread

Breaking Bread: Feeding Family and Friends

“Breaking bread”, or eating a meal with others, is a deeply personal way to foster a sense of belonging. Food is a social glue; it brings us together for conversation, a time to catch up, a chance to connect with loved ones, and it fills our bellies as well.

If you wish to “break bread” (with actual bread), here are some nice, tasty bites of information.bread 2

  • The hypnotic, heavenly, warm, welcoming aroma of freshly baked bread makes many of us feel that all is right with the world and provides a sense of comfort.
  • Researchers have found that the smell of baking bread triggers a positive mood that leads to a higher degree of benevolence, kindness, and concern for the welfare of others.

“Bread – like real love – took time, cultivation, strong loving hands, and patience. It lived, rising and growing to fruition only under the most perfect circumstances”. – Melissa Hill, Something from Tiffany’s

  • A fascinating thing about bread is that though it is often viewed as a “poverty fuel”, it can feel like a luxury to even the most monetarily wealthy of individuals.

“”There are people in the world so hungry, that God cannot appear to them except in the form of bread”. – Mahatma Gandhi

  • If you’re going to break bread with bread, go for healthy whole grain varieties for plenty of good-for-you minerals, vitamins, and fiber.

Break bread for a healthy life.

PG

Author: Angela Hinkle – ahinkle@ufl.edu

Angela Hinkle is the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) Agent in Escambia County.

Angela Hinkle

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/04/01/breaking-bread-feeding-family-and-friends/

Artisan Bread in Five Minutes

bread_imageOne of the most comforting memories of childhood has to be the smell of homemade yeast bread wafting throughout the house!  Baking yeast bread, like many other kitchen traditions is making a comeback.  Bread is a wonderful source of carbohydrades, especially if the flour is made from whole grains.  (These kernels consist of three parts: the bran, the embryo and the endosperm).   Eating breads made with whole grain flour can help you Make Half Your Grains Whole, as the dietary guidelines recommend.

However, the traditional yeast bread making method – proof yeast, knead dough, rise, punch down, rest, form, rise again, and bake….is being debunked!

I’ve been experimenting with many of the recipes in Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day and Healthy Bread in Five Minutes a Day mostly to find a simple experience for baking yeast breads with children during 4-H summer camps.  However, my experiments have been so successful that I have asked permission from Publicity @St. Martin’s Press to actually publish the master recipe as long as I give credit where credit is due.

There are those out there, myself included,  that swear by the discovery of Jeff Hertzberg, M.D., and Zoë Francois that Artisan Bread can indeed be made in just five minutes of “active effort” every day.

The aforementioned authors published their first book in 2007.  Currently, they have three best-selling cookbooks on the market, all of which are a very practical guide to producing delicious artisan bread and bread products that require a minimal of basic ingredients: flour, water, yeast and salt.  The equipment is nominal too: measuring cups and spoons, a large storage container with a lid, a sturdy mixing tool and of course sheets or pans and an oven to bake your bread in.  Of course there are other gadgets but none as necessary as what is listed.

Specifically, the authors choose the French boule (“boule” in French means “ball”) as the basic model for bread making as the shape is easy to form, the taste delicious and quite nutritious.

If you are interested in giving this process a try you can find the recipe in its entirety by clicking here Master Bread Recipe.

PG

Author: Heidi Copeland – hbc@ufl.edu

Family and Consumer Sciences Extension Agent, Leon County Florida
Educational Program Focus:
•Food, Nutrition and Wellness

•Child Development and Parenting
http:leon.ifas.edu

Heidi Copeland

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/05/15/artisan-bread-in-five-minutes/

Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day

bread_image

Make half your grains whole with homemade whole grain bread.

One of the most comforting memories of childhood has to be the smell of homemade yeast bread wafting throughout the house!  Baking yeast bread, like many other kitchen traditions is making a comeback.  Bread is a wonderful source of carbohydrades, especially if the flour is made from whole grains.  (These kernels consist of three parts: the bran, the embryo and the endosperm).   Eating breads made with whole grain flour can help you Make Half Your Grains Whole, as the dietary guidelines recommend.

However, the traditional yeast bread making method – proof yeast, knead dough, rise, punch down, rest, form, rise again, and bake….is being debunked!

I’ve been experimenting with many of the recipes in Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day and Healthy Bread in Five Minutes a Day mostly to find a simple experience for baking yeast breads with children during 4-H summer camps.  However, my experiments have been so successful that I have asked permission from Publicity @St. Martin’s Press to actually publish the master recipe as long as I give credit where credit is due.

There are those out there, myself included,  that swear by the discovery of Jeff Hertzberg, M.D., and Zoë Francois that Artisan Bread can indeed be made in just five minutes of “active effort” every day.

The aforementioned authors published their first book in 2007.  Currently, they have three best-selling cookbooks on the market, all of which are a very practical guide to producing delicious artisan bread and bread products that require a minimal of basic ingredients: flour, water, yeast and salt.  The equipment is nominal too: measuring cups and spoons, a large storage container with a lid, a sturdy mixing tool and of course sheets or pans and an oven to bake your bread in.  Of course there are other gadgets but none as necessary as what is listed.

Specifically, the authors choose the French boule (“boule” in French means “ball”) as the basic model for bread making as the shape is easy to form, the taste delicious and quite nutritious.

If you are interested in giving this process a try you can find the recipe in its entirety by clicking here Master Bread Recipe.pdf

PG

Author: Heidi Copeland – hbc@ufl.edu

Family and Consumer Sciences Extension Agent, Leon County Florida
Educational Program Focus:
•Food, Nutrition and Wellness

•Child Development and Parenting
http:leon.ifas.edu

Heidi Copeland

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/05/09/artisan-bread-in-five-minutes-a-day/

4-H Celebrates Agriculture by Baking Bread for National Bread Month in November

When most of us go to the pantry to make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, we don’t think about where the ingredients come from. We all know that peanuts go into the peanut butter and grapes and sugar make the jelly, but what about the bread itself?

There are four main ingredients in any basic bread and its uses and variations are endless. Basic bread recipes usually include flour, water, yeast, sugar.

While working with 4-H youth in a cooking project, why not try to encourage them to make their own variation of plain bread and have some fun?

Some of the many varieties you can bake are: French peasant bread, honey wheat bread and Italian loaf. Click on any of the following links to get great bread-baking tips and recipes to use with kids. Who knows, they may come up with a great variety of their own!

As a volunteer, we encourage youth to develop their own ideas and exert their independence by experimenting within the safety of a 4-H Club environment. Here are some other ideas for extensions of a simple bread-baking activity with youth that incorporate the four essential elements:

Mastery – Have a bread tasting contest and incorporate a skill-a-thon with measurements, tools and ingredients from basic breads to fancy, specialty items.

Gennerosity – Youth can have a Bake-A-Thon or Bake Sale and give all proceeds and products to a local shelter, food bank or food ministry. Students can also make gifts of bread and products that they have made for relatives and other club members.

Belonging – Since all youth like to share their creations, make a collage of pictures of everyone baking and sampling their breads to post to a local website, newspaper or social media page. This is also a great way to raise awareness for local 4-H clubs and their activities.

Independence – Allow 4-Hers to visit a local bakery and ask questions about their business model and how they got started. This allows youth to seejobs and careers related to their interests in the community.

Some other resources are:

http://www.bakingmad.com/kids/getting-kids-interested-in-cooking.

http://www.bakingmad.com/recipes/whitebreads

http://www.perishablenews.com/index.php?article=0018522

http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/bakewithkids

Sherri Kraeft

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2012/11/26/4-h-celebrates-agriculture-by-baking-bread-for-national-bread-month-in-november/