Tag Archive: Choice

Panhandle Ag e-News 2016 Reader’s Choice Awards

The Panhandle Ag e-news project began in April of 2012.  Over the past five years,  1,131 articles have been published that are searchable by topic area, keyword, author, or by using the search engine box provided on the site.  The Panhandle Agriculture Extension Team is made up of 40 county agents and specialists serving commercial agriculture in Northwest Florida.  This faculty team contributed articles on a weekly basis to provide educational information to farmers and ranchers in the region related to farm management, pest management, best management practice recommendations, as well as announcements for upcoming educational events.  The electronic newsletter is made up of four parts:  a WordPress website that allows numerous authors to add content, weekly notifications via email using the Subscription Management System (SMS), as well as Facebook and Twitter accounts which provide direct links to newly published articles for subscribers.

2016 was an even more successful year for Panhandle Ag e-News.  18 county agents and 18 state specialists contributed 304 articles in 2016, that were posted to the website, with links shared through Facebook and twitter accounts. 46 issues of the electronic newsletter were emailed to 3,775 subscribers.  The newsletters, along with Facebook and twitter posts generated 167,881 page views (459/day) in 2016.  This represented a 26% increase in subscribers from the previous year, and a 52% increase in readership as compared to 2015. In 2016, the Facebook followers grew 240% from 318 to 1,084, and the number of twitter followers grew 30% from 350 to 456 at the end of the year.

There were quite a number of the articles that were very popular, but there were some articles that really stood out as favorites.  The following are the 30 most read articles, and the 10 most popular jokes published in 2016:

1st Place

Hay Bale Size Really Does Matter

The 2016 Reader’s Choice Award goes to an article written by Matt Hersom, UF/IFAS Beef Extension Specialist.  Matt’s article that discussed the difference in weight of round bales of varying dimension and the numbers of bales need to feed 25 cows per week.  His article was a smash hit on social media, because it was relevant to both hay producers and hay buyers, and was read 10,169 times in 2016.

2nd Place

What Happened to Your Pasture?

The runner up this year was an article written by Mark Mauldin, Washington County Ag Agent.  Mark’s article discussed issues that cause pastures to decline to the point they need to be renovated.  His article was read 1,409 times because he tackled such an intriguing topic.

3rd Place

Enhancing the Market Value of Your Next Calf Crop

The third most read article was written by Kalyn Waters, Holmes County Extension Director.  Kalyn captured some great advice to share from Ed Neel, Dothan Livestock Market on basic techniques to get more value from calves sold through a livestock market.  Her article was read 974 times.

Honorable Mention

USDA Confirms Screwworms in the Florida Keys

The fourth most popular article was written by Doug Mayo, Jackson County Extension Director.  Doug’s article shared the disturbing reports of screw worms that are infesting the native deer population in the Florida Keys.  This article was read 949 times.

The other most read articles, listed in order of popularity, are:

10 Most popular Friday Funnies

  1. Top 20 Cow One-liners – 1,707 page views
  2. You Might be a Farmer – 509
  3. Cowboy Math – 448
  4. Couple Sex – 429
  5. Football Rivalry Insults – 396
  6. The Cow Salesman – 353
  7. English is a Crazy Language – 336
  8. The Guard Mule – 309
  9. The Lifesaving Lie – 309
  10. Friday Not so Funny – 307

These articles were ranked based on the number of times readers opened the link to each page in 2016.  The editors and authors would love to hear your feedback on the articles that were most helpful to you.  Use the comment box below to share what articles, or types of articles you got the most benefit from this past year.

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/07/panhandle-ag-e-news-2016-readers-choice-awards/

Perennial Peanut, A Great Choice for Panhandle Pastures and Landscapes

Perennial Peanut, A Great Choice for Panhandle Pastures and Landscapes

perennial_peanut

Figure 1: Perennial Peanut Field. Credit: Ray Bodrey, UF/IFAS.

Driving through rural parts of the Panhandle this time of year, one will find pastures with thick green canopies, exploding with the yellow-gold flowers. Perennial peanut is in bloom. This is a highly nutritional forage option for livestock, but also makes for a beautiful urban groundcover.

Perennial Peanut was introduced from Brazil in the mid 1930’s. Though a non-native, the perennial peanut has not been shown to be a nuisance nor an invasive. The plant is in the same genus as the peanut that humans consume, however, this plant is a true perennial, living year to year. Perennial peanut, Arachis glabrata, does not reproduce by seed. Therefore, wildlife, specifically birds, are unable to disburse the plant into unintended areas.

As a side note, a few perennial peanut cultivars, such as Arachis pintoi or “pinto peanut,” can be planted by seed. This species has stolons or “runners” and will produce advantageous roots at the nodes. The pinto peanut has become confused in the nursery trade with the Florida-developed perennial peanut. There has been limited research to date on how well pinto peanuts perform as groundcover. The pinto peanut is more susceptible to winter kill, insect damage, and nematodes than the cultivar Arachis glabrata.

The Florida developed perennial peanut is used mostly for hay or grazing by livestock such as horses, beef and dairy cattle, sheep and goats, as well as wildlife such as deer, rabbits, and turkeys. The most common cultivars for pastures are “Florigraze” and “Arbrook.” These cultivars were released by UF/IFAS and USDA in 1978 and in 1985. Since the release, these cultivars have also has been used in citrus groves as a cover crop as well as a ground cover in roadway medians. In Florida, it has been planted on approximately 30,000 acres.

Perennial peanut is high in nutritional value and is easily digestible by forage animals. It’s also a nitrogen fixer. Like all legumes, perennial peanut obtains its nitrogen from a bacteria associated with the plant’s root system. Therefore, it naturally adds nitrogen to the soil, reducing the amount of nitrogen fertilizer needed, if used with other crops or plants in a landscape.

Perennial peanut will reach ½ – 1 ½ feet in height. The plant is propagated using rhizomes and can be purchased as mats of sod or in containers. With its extensive root system, rhizoma perennial peanut spreads across the ground as a sod grass would perform. Perennial peanut grows best in sandy to sandy loam soils with a target soil pH of 6.0. Although, a soil range of 5.8 – 7.0 is adequate. It does require at least 30 inches of rain per year.

In home landscapes, several cultivars are available and have limited maintenance issues. “Ecoturf” and “Arblick” are the most popular cultivars used due to their lower growth and profuse flowering. These cultivars thrive in coastal areas as they are considered salt tolerant. Salt spray, drift and short term salt water flooding have little effect. Mowing is not required, but edging may be needed as the plant spreads. Weed control is the most concerning, especially during establishment. For pest management, peanut stunt virus cases have been reported. The symptoms are leaf mottling and yield depressions, but are rarely diagnosed unless the plant is under drought or nutrient stress.

All information considered, perennial peanut is a great option for Panhandle livestock producers or home landscape enthusiasts. Contact your local county extension office for more information.

Supporting information for this article can be found in the UF/IFAS EDIS publications:

Guide to Using Rhizomal Perennial Peanut in the Urban Landscape”, by Robert E. Rouse, Elan M. Miavitz and Fritz M. Roka

Rhizoma Perennial Peanut”, by M.J. Williams, Y.C. Newman and Ann Blount

Perennial Peanut: A Quick Reference”, by Yoana C. Newman, Cheryl L. Mackowiak, Ann R. Blount and Jason Ferrell

Rhizoma Perennial Peanut (Arachis glabrata) – The Perennial Peanut for Urban Conservation in Florida”, by USDA NRCS

 

PG

Author: Ray Bodrey – rbodrey@ufl.edu

Gulf County Extension Director, Agent II Agriculture, Natural Resource & Community Development

Ray Bodrey

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/09/17/perennial-peanut-a-great-choice-for-panhandle-pastures-and-landscapes-2/

Perennial Peanut, a Great Choice for Panhandle Pastures and Landscapes

Perennial Peanut, a Great Choice for Panhandle Pastures and Landscapes

Driving through rural panhandle counties this time of year, one finds pastures with thick green canopies, exploding with yellow-gold flowers. Perennial peanut is in bloom. This is a highly nutritional forage option for livestock and also makes for a beautiful urban groundcover alternative to turfgrass.

perennial_peanut

Perennial Peanut Field. Photo credit: Ray Bodrey, UF/IFAS.

Perennial peanut was introduced from Brazil in the mid 1930’s. Though a non-native, the perennial peanut has not been shown to be a nuisance nor an invasive. The plant is in the same genus as the peanut that humans consume. However, this plant is a true perennial, living year to year. Perennial peanut does produce a small seed pod. But rhizoma perennial peanut, Arachis glabrata, does not reproduce by seed. Therefore, wildlife, specifically birds, are unable to disburse the plant into unintended areas.

As a side note, few perennial peanut cultivars, such as Arachis pintoi or “pinto peanut”, can be planted by seed. This species has stolons or “runners” and will produce adventitious roots at the nodes. The pinto peanut has become confused in nursery trade with the Florida-developed perennial peanut. Limited research to date has shown how well pinto peanuts perform as groundcover. The pinto peanut is more susceptible to winter kill, insect damage and nematodes than the cultivar Arachis glabrata.

The Florida developed perennial peanut is used mostly for hay or grazing by livestock such as horses, beef & dairy cattle, sheep and goats, as well as wildlife such as deer, rabbits and turkeys. The most common cultivars for pastures are “Florigrazed” and “Arbook”. These cultivars were released by UF IFAS and USDA in 1978 and in 1985. Since the release, these cultivars have also has been used in citrus groves as a cover crop as well as a ground cover in roadway medians. In Florida, it has been planted on approximately 30,000 acres.

Perennial peanut is high in nutritional value and is easily digestible by forage animals. It’s also a nitrogen fixer. Like all legumes, perennial peanut obtains its nitrogen from a bacteria associated with the plant’s root system. Therefore, it naturally adds nitrogen to the soil, reducing the amount of fertilizer needed if used with other crops or plants in a landscape.

Perennial peanut will reach ½ – 1 ½ feet in height. The plant is propagated using rhizomes and can be purchased as mats of sod or in containers. With its extensive root system, rhizoma perennial peanut spreads across the ground as a sod grass would perform. Perennial peanut grows best in sandy to sandy loam soils with a target soil pH of 6.0 although a soil range of 5.8 – 7.0 is adequate. It requires high moisture, with at least 30 inches of rain per year.

In home landscapes, several cultivars are available and have limited maintenance issues. “Ecoturf” and “Arblick” are the most popular cultivars used due to their lower height and profuse flowering. These cultivars thrive in coastal areas as they are considered salt tolerant. Salt spray, drift and short term salt water flooding have little effect. Mowing is not required but edging may be needed as the plant spreads. Weed control is the most concerning, especially during establishment. For pest management, peanut stunt virus cases have been reported. The symptoms are leaf mottling and yield depressions, but are rarely a problem unless the plant is under drought or nutrient stress.

All information considered, perennial peanut is a great option for panhandle livestock producers or the home landscape enthusiast.

 

Supporting information for this article can be found in the UF/IFAS EDIS publications:

“Guide to Using Rhizomal Perennial Peanut in the Urban Landscape”, by Robert E. Rouse, Elan M. Miavitz and Fritz M. Roka.

“Rhizoma Perennial Peanut”, by M.J. Williams, Y.C. Newman and Ann Blount.

“Perennial Peanut: A Quick Reference”, by Yoana C. Newman, Cheryl L. Mackowiak, Ann R. Blount and Jason Ferrell.

“Plant Materials Fact Sheet: Rhizoma Perennial Peanut (Arachis glabrata) – The Perennial Peanut for Urban Conservation in Florida”, by USDA NRCS.

 

PG

Author: Ray Bodrey – rbodrey@ufl.edu

Gulf County Extension Director, Agent II Agriculture, Natural Resource & Community Development

Ray Bodrey

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/09/08/perennial-peanut-a-great-choice-for-panhandle-pastures-and-landscapes/

Panhandle Ag e-News 2015 Reader’s Choice Awards

15 Reader's Choice Award2015 was an even more successful year for the Panhandle Ag e-News electronic newsletter project.  There were a total of 258 articles contributed by 37 County Agents and State Specialist authors in 2015.  This year the website registered over 108,044 total web page views as compared to 68,571 in 2014 (56% increase). Word is spreading and more and more farmers and ranchers are taking advantage of this service.

There were some really interesting articles added to the collection this year.  Since the Panhandle Ag e-news project began in 2013, a total of 915 articles have been published that are searchable by category, keyword, or author. The following were the Top 50 most read articles written in 2015 by UF/IFAS State Specialists and County Agents.

Top 50 Most Popular Articles published in 2015

1st Place

Doveweed: a Growing Problem in Warm-season Turfgrasses

The 2015 Reader’s Choice Award goes to an article written by Ramon Leon, WFREC Weed Specialist.  His article on doveweed control in turfgrasses was read  3,203 times in 2015.

2nd Place

What are the Long-Term Impacts of Estrus Synchronization and Artificial Insemination?

The runner up this year was an article about the impact of estrus synchronization and artificial insemination on a cattle herd, written by Cliff lamb, NFREC Beef Reproduction Specialist that was read 1,466 times.

3rd Place

Pasture Soil Fertility Essential to Prevent Broomsedge Infestations

The third most read article was an article on broomsedge prevention in pastures, written by Mark Mauldin, Washington County Extension, that had 1,344 page views.

Honorable Mention

The “Bud Box” and Double Alley Design for Cattle Pens

The 4th most popular article describes a cattle handling pen design that has become very popular around the country,  was written by Doug Mayo, Jackson County Extension and had 1,143 page views.

The other most read articles, listed in order of popularity are:

5 – Bee Pastures Supplement Hive Nutrition and Enhance Honey Production

6 – Increasing Income from Calves Sold at your Local Livestock Market

7 – 2015 Cool-Season Forage Variety Recommendations for Florida

8- Toxic Indigo Creeping Into the Panhandle

9 – Pest Alert: Boxwood Blight

10 – Steve & Seth Basford Honored as Jackson County Agricultural Innovators

11 – Tomato Variety Selection for the Florida Panhandle

12 – Converting Planted Pine to Silvopasture Benefits Cattle & Timber

13 – “Super” El Niño Poised to Disrupt Weather Patterns

14 – Fireweed: a Pasture Weed that will Light You Up!

15 – 2014 NASS Farm Land Rent & Labor Survey Summary

16 – Grazing Management is Key for Profitable Livestock Production

17 – Small Farm Blueberry Production for the Panhandle

18 – Crop Rotation May Determine the Profitability of Peanuts in 2015

19 – Choosing the Correct Liming Material

20 – Factors that Affect Egg Production in Chickens

21 – Monensin Toxicity in Horses: What to Look For

22 – New Thrips-Transmitted Plant Viruses in Florida Crops

23 – Fireweed: A Burning Problem for Farmers

24 – Integrating Perennial Peanut into Grass Pastures

25 – Update on 2014 peanut leaf spot fungicide trials in Citra, FL.

26 – Debunking GMO Myths

27 – Low Tunnels Provide Year-Round Gardening Versatility

28 – Spiderwort Spreading and Could Become a Hay Field Pest

29 – Tung Trees – Historic Crop; Toxic Legacy

30 – 15th Annual Florida Bull Test Summary and Sale Information

31 – New Peach Cultivar Trial at the North Florida Research and Education Center

32 – Robert Jackson Honored as Gadsden County Agricultural Innovator

33 – Jerry Davis honored as the 2015 Northwest Florida Agricultural Innovator of the Year

34 – Dogfennel: Ugly Pasture Weeds that Reduce Bahia Production

35 – When is Hay Dry Enough?

36 – High Tunnels Can Exclude Vegetable Pests

37 – Hairy Indigo Control in Peanuts

38 – Winter Burns Benefit Bermudagrass Hay Fields

39 – Crop Oil: Use 1 Gallon per Hundred or 1 Quart per Acre?

40 – Common Bermudagrass Control in Peanuts with Fusilade or Select

41 – Things to Consider When Moving Honey Bee Hives

42 – 2014 UF Peanut Variety Test Results

43 – Are Grafted Vegetables for You?

44 – Highlights and Presentations from the 2015 Beef Conference

45 – Cotton Irrigation Scheduling App Saves Water & Money

46 – Biochar: New Applications of an Old Agricultural Practice

47 – 2014 USDA Honey Production Report

48 – Peanut Disease and Nematode Management Update

49 – Summer Annual Forage Update

50 – Carinata Meal: A Potential Feed Supplement

These articles were ranked based on the number of times readers opened the link to each page in 2015.  The editors and authors would love to hear your feedback on the articles that were most helpful to you.  Use the comment box below to share what articles, or types of articles you got the most benefit from this year.

 

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/12/19/panhandle-ag-e-news-2015-readers-choice-awards/

Leyland Cypress…not the best choice

Leyland Cypress…not the best choice

Photo Credit: Ed Gilman, UF/IFAS

Photo Credit: Ed Gilman, UF/IFAS

Leyland cypress, x Cupressocyparis leylandii, has been hugely popular over the past 20 years as an ornamental landscape tree. It has the reputation of being a beautiful evergreen that can grow at a rate of up to 3 to 4 feet per year. Sounds like the perfect option for someone looking to make their back yard more secluded and private. Because of these traits, it has been planted widely throughout the southeastern US, including the Florida panhandle, only to succumb to intense environmental conditions and disease pressure.

UF/IFAS suggests that other species be used in place of Leyland cypress because of the damaging effects of Seiridium canker. The disease is a fungal organism that attacks the tree after periods of drought while the tree is under stress. Once the stress has occurred and rain does arrive the fungus attacks the vulnerable trees in the wetter periods. The major symptom is “flagging” or branches that have turned brown that can be scattered throughout the tree. This is caused by a canker further up the brown branch that has been girdled,cut of from the flow of water and nutrients to the branch by diseased tissue.

Flag branch on Leyland Cypress. Photo Credit: UF/IFAS

Flag branch on Leyland Cypress. Photo Credit: UF/IFAS

What are the options for Florida panhandle landscapers and homeowners? If you have a tree exhibiting symptoms of Seiridium canker, pruning the “flag” branches out several inches below the canker can prolong the life of the tree but is very unlikely to save it. The only long term sustainable option is to replace Leyland cypress with species that are resistant to the disease. The following are good examples of species that could be considered:

 

Common Name

Scientific Name

Atlantic white cedar

Chamaecyparis thyoides

Southern red cedar

Juniperus silicicola

Arizona cypress

Cupressus arizonica var. glabra

Mexican cypress

Cupressus lusitanica

Oriental arborvitae

Platycladus orientalis

“Green Giant” arborvitae

Thuja x ‘Green Giant’

Kashmir cypress

Cupressus cashmeriana

Chinese funeral cypress

Cupressus funebris

Chinese cypress

Cupressus chengiana

Hinoki cypress

Chamaecyparis obtusa

For more information read the University of Florida publication, Seiridium Canker of Leyland Cypress.

 

PG

Author: Blake Thaxton – bthaxton@ufl.edu

Santa Rosa County Extension Agent I, Commercial Horticulture

Blake Thaxton

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/08/19/leyland-cypressnot-the-best-choice/

Webinar: Farmers Making a Smart Choice for Health Insurance

Jackson Farmer's MarketDate: January 28, 2015

Time: 1:00 – 2:30 Eastern Time (12:00-1:30 pm CT)

Presented by national expert:
Dr. Roberta Riportella, Kansas State University Extension

A panel of experts have been invited to answer questions, including:

  • IRS

  • SBA

Participants will learn how the Affordable Care Act affects farm/ranch families as individuals (consumers), as business operators, and their farm workers. Enrollment assisters who work with farmers and ranchers are also encouraged to attend.

Webinar Link: https://hrsaseminar.adobeconnect.com/acafarmers/

Call-in Number: 888-469-1349/ Participant Passcode: 5724564

 

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/01/24/webinar-farmers-making-a-smart-choice-for-health-insurance/

Panhandle Ag e-News 2014 Reader’s Choice Awards

2014 Reader's Choice AwardThe Panhandle Agriculture Extension Team thanks you for subscribing to Panhandle Ag e-News this past year.

2014 was an even more successful year for this electronic newsletter project. Our subscriber list increased from 2,775 at the beginning of 2014 to 3,393 in 2015 (22% growth).  Last year we had 68,571 total web page views as compared to 36,513 in 2013 (88% increase). Word is spreading and more and more farmers and ranchers are taking advantage of this service.

There were a total of 266 articles contributed by 36 County Agents and State Specialist authors in 2014. The following were the top 40 articles written in 2014.

  1. The Panhandle Ag Reader’s Choice Award goes to an article written by Doug Mayo, Jackson County Extension, that was published October 24, 2014, and was viewed 623 times in 2014.

    Understanding Your Forage Test Report

  2. In second place was an article written by Jed Dillard, Jefferson County Extension, with 612 views:

    Making the Best of a Bad Situation – Storing Large Round Hay Bales Outside

  3. The third most read article was written by Doug Mayo, Jackson County Extension, with 597 views:

    Complying with the New Florida Cattle ID Rule

  4. Honorable mention goes to an article written by Doug Mayo, Jackson County Extension with 592 views:

    What is the Best Grass for Pastures in the Panhandle?

     

  5. The Limited Poultry and Egg Farm Operation Rule Becomes Effective July 1, 2014

  6. Large Carpenter Bee Management and Control

  7. Celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the US Extension Service

  8. Pigweed Suppression Using a Ryegrass Cover Crop

  9. History of Snowfall in North Florida

  10. Chikungunya Arbovirus – A New Mosquito Borne Illness in Florida

  11. Scout Pastures for Toxic Perilla Mint this Fall

  12. What Does the Launch of New Generic Fungicides Mean for Plant Disease Management?

  13. Herbicide Alternatives for Prickly Pear and Dogfennel without Cleanwave

  14. Oriental Persimmons Varieties for North Florida

  15. Satsuma Protection in Cold Weather Extremes

  16. Tips for Controlling Armyworms in Hay Fields

  17. Vaseygrass in your Bermuda hayfield? Start your management now!

  18. Are You Getting Your Money’s Worth from Your Hay?

  19. Vaseygrass Becoming a Common Sight, Unfortunately

  20. New University of Florida Peanut Varieties for 2014

  21. Manage Honey Bees Now to Prepare for Next Year’s Nectar Flow

  22. Goatweed Spreading West: Found in Holmes County Pastures

  23. It’s in Florida: Rose Rosette Virus, a Devastating Disease on Roses

  24. USDA Microloans Available for Small Farms

  25. Start Preparing for Winter Pastures

  26. Sesame Production: A New Crop for Florida

  27. Temporary Pastures Can Hide Ugly Surprises

  28. Thistle Control in Pastures

  29. A New Chestnut Trial Planned for NFREC-Quincy

  30. UF/IFAS Strip Till Cotton Variety Test Results

  31. Panhandle Farm Facts from the 2012 Census of Agriculture

  32. Spring Appearance of Ground Bees

  33. Florida Food Connect: A Tool to Help Producers Engage with Customers

  34. Managing Aquatic Plants in Farm Ponds

  35. Make the Most of Your Pond This Year!

  36. Western Flower Thrips Develop Insecticide Resistance in North Florida

  37. Yellowing in Peanuts Due to Manganese Deficiency

  38. 2014 Row Crop Comparison Tools and Budgets

  39. When Should I Thin My Pine Trees?

  40. Watermelon Novel Bacterial Leaf Spot Research Update

 

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/01/17/panhandle-ag-e-news-2014-readers-choice-awards/

Camellia japonica ‘Magnoliaeflora’- A Worthwile Choice

 Recently, I was working on a camellia identification project in a forgotten camellia garden of about 60  plants. Most camellias I observed were not yet in flower but one in particular caught my eye. I later identified this eye catcher as Camellia japonica ‘Magnoliaeflora’.

 

Flower of Camellia japonica 'Magnoliaeflora' Image Credit Matthew Orwat

Flower of Camellia japonica ‘Magnoliaeflora’
Image Credit Matthew Orwat

 

Magnoliaeflora is so named due to its off white magnolia formed semi-double flowers. It’s petals have a distinctive curl and can sometimes resemble a star. Plants are slow-growing but can reach six feet tall and four feet wide after several decades. This slow growth makes it ideal for smaller landscapes where some giant japonica cultivars would be out-of-place.

Its buds and flowers are resistant to cold temperatures, thus flowering is able to occur in mid January, a tad earlier than many other japonicas. This classic camellia should be tried in more Northwest Florida landscapes, particularly newer ones where camellias seem all but absent.

Flower of Camellia japonica 'Magnoliaeflora' Image Credit Matthew Orwat

Flower of Camellia japonica ‘Magnoliaeflora’
Image Credit Matthew Orwat

PG

Author: Matthew Orwat – mjorwat@ufl.edu

Matthew J. Orwat started his career with UF / IFAS in 2011 and is the Horticulture Extension Agent for Washington County Florida. His goal is to provide educational programming to meet the diverse needs of and provide solutions for homeowners and small farmers with ornamental, turf, fruit and vegetable gardening objectives. Please feel free to contact him with any questions you may have.
http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/lng/about/

Matthew Orwat

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/01/27/camellia-japonica-magnoliaeflora-a-worthwile-choice/

Panahandle Ag 2013 Reader’s Choice Awards

Reader's Choice AwardPanhandle Agriculture e-News was started in April of 2012, to keep farmers and ranchers informed about best management practices, current issues, pest alerts, ongoing research, and upcoming educational events.  County Agents and State Specialists published 207 articles in 2013.  All total, the project generated over 36,000 web page visits in 2013.  Use the comment section below to provide some feedback so the information you need most is provided each week, and when you have an opportunity, let your County Agent know how feel about Panhandle Agriculture e-News.

The 2013 Reader’s Choice Award goes to:  Roy Carter, Gulf County Extension  for his article Managing Hive Robbing Behavior in Bees, published June 28, 2013, with a total of 602 page views.  In second place was Cool Season Forage Planting Decisions, written by Doug Mayo, Jackson County Extension, & Ann Blount, UF/IFAS NFREC, with 327 page views. Judy Ludlow, Calhoun County Extension, took third place with Warm Season Fish Pond Management, which received 307 page views.  Shep Eubanks, Holmes County Extension, received honorable mention for his article Peanut Maturity Determination, which received 301 page views.

Below are the 50 most read Panhandle Ag e-News articles in 2013, excluding event, government program, and award announcements.  Browse through and take a look at the articles you may have missed.  All of the articles posted on the website are searchable by topic or keyword, so if you don’t find a topic of interest, go to the home page and use the search box to see what has been posted on the topic.

50 Most Read Panhandle Ag e-News Articles in 2013

1

Managing Hive Robbing Behavior in Bees

2

Cool Season Forage Planting Decisions

3

Warm Season Fish Pond Management

4

Peanut Maturity Determination

5

Carinata: A Crop with Potential for Florida’s Farmers

6

Protect Young Satsuma Trees when Temperatures drop into the 20′s

7

Heavy Rains Cause Fertility Problems for Farmers & Ranchers

8

Genetically Modified (GM) Crops: Straight Talk on Complex, Often Controversial Technologies.

9

Raisin’ Cane and Making Syrup — An Ol’ Florida Tradition

10

Paraquat Tank Mix Compatibility Issues

11

Have you seen this Goatweed?

12

Spotted Wilt Virus in Tomato

13

New Small Farm Poultry and Egg Regulations Coming

14

Citrus Canker found in Northwest Florida

15

Deer Antler Abnormalities

16

Satsuma: a New (Old) Alternative Crop for North Florida

17

Researchers Seek Cure For New Watermelon Pathogen

18

Imported Fire Ant Considerations for Livestock Operations

19

Managing Fireweed In Pastures

20

Peanut Harvest is Just Beginning

21

2013 Cotton Harvest Timing and Defoliation

22

Managing Crimson Clover to Reseed

23

Excessive Rain Creates Many Problems for Growers

24

U-scout: An Excellent Resource for Vegetable Disease Diagnosis

25

Peanut Maturity Update

26

Factors that Affect Corn Kernel Abortion

27

“Sodbuster” Radish- an Alternative for Winter Cover Crops

28

Mepiquat Timing on Cotton

29

Round Bale Silage, a Viable Option for Rain-Weary Hay Producers.

30

Wildlife is on the Move in Florida’s Fall and Winter

31

Panhandle Fresh Looking for More Farmers

32

USDA Releases Farm Land Value Report

33

Benefits of Prescribed Burning

34

Aquafarming… Florida’s Underwater Agriculture!

35

Is my Small Farm Organic?

36

Growing Pasture Under Shade a Challenging Mix

37

Target Spot on the Increase in Cotton

38

Kudzu Bugs in Washington County

39

South Dakota Blizzard Devastates Ranchers

40

Caterpillars Are Eating Well In Wakulla County

41

Control Wild Hogs to Prevent Crop Damage

42

Optimum Soil Fertility is an Essential Part of Weed Control

43

Managing Cattle “Shrink” at Shipping to Increase Profits

44

Under Cover: The Revealing Story behind Cover Crops

45

Spring Appearance of Ground Bees

46

Conditions are Prime for White Mold in Peanuts

47

Get Ready for Cotton Thrips

48

Soil Test First!

49

Leafhopper-burn in Peanuts

50

Winter Feeding the Annual Dilemma
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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Jackson County Extension Director, & Livestock & Forages Agent

My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/12/20/panahandle-ag-2013-readers-choice-awards/