Tag Archive: Contest

Friday Feature: Southeast Hay Contest Video

Friday Feature:  Southeast Hay Contest Video

The Southeast Hay Contest was started 14 years ago to showcase the excellent quality hay that is produced in the South.  If you take pride in producing high quality hay, this is an opportunity to see how the best hay you produce compares to other farms in the region.  This week’s featured video was produced by Massey Ferguson, the major sponsor of the contest, to help spread the word about the Southeast Hay Contest.

It is not too late to enter this year’s contest.  Contact your local County Extension Office and make an appointment to have your hay or balage tested.  Entries must be received by the UGA Forage Lab by 5:00 PM Thursday, September 21, 2017.  Entries must be signed by your local county agent to verify production.  Rules and entry information are all available on the SE Hay Contest website:  http://blog.caes.uga.edu/sehaycontest/  Winners will be recognized at the 40th annual Sunbelt Ag Expo, in Moultrie, GA on Tuesday, October 17th.

Hay and baleage samples will compete in the following seven categories:

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If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/08/friday-feature-southeast-hay-contest-video/

4-H Tailgate Cookery Contest

This contest teaches youth about meat science, food safety and communication skills.

Tailgating.  The smell of charcoal in the air.  Cooking over a hot grill.  Earning lots of scholarship money?

The Florida 4-H Tailgate Contest completed its first year in 2016, giving out over $ 15,000 in scholarship money to 4-H members.  This was made possible by sponsorships from Winn-Dixie, National Beef, and Sonny’s.  In 2017, Sanderson Farms joins the list of sponsors for this statewide event.

While earning scholarship money is great, youth also learn many valuable life skills in the art of grilling.  A curriculum series was developed (see below) to help youth learn about fire-building, meat selection, cooking safety, smoking and slow cooking meat, and cooking equipment.  The Northwest District has been very proactive in hosting different tailgate and grilling day camps throughout the panhandle to further youth learning.

Youth demonstrate their knowledge during the district and state contests, and can win a college scholarship.

The Florida 4-H Tailgate Contest allows youth to grill two 6-8 ounce portions of one of the following proteins: beef, pork, poultry (half chicken or turkey breast), and headless, deveined, fresh shrimp.  At each contest, judges will observe the food and fire safety of each participant and ask students questions about their recipe and safety knowledge.  A team of judges will then evaluate the cooked product.

There are four contests hosted throughout the state including the South contest at 4-H Camp Cloverleaf, the Central contest in Dade City, the Northeast contest at the UF Horse Teaching Unit, and the Northwest contest held at the Washington County Fairgrounds.  After youth compete at the local county contests/day camps, they can register for the district contest.  The Northwest contest will be held on July 22, where the first place winner in each protein category receives $ 400, second place $ 250, third place $ 100, and fourth place $ 50.  The top two winners from each protein area at the district contest are then eligible to compete in the state contest held at the University of Florida on October 14, 2017.  For the state contest, the first place winner in each protein area receives a $ 1,500 college scholarship and the second place winner receives a $ 1,000 college scholarship.

We hope to see you at one of the many grilling opportunities offered throughout the Northwest District this summer through 4-H!

Day Camp Dates and Locations:

Contact your local UF IFAS County Extension Office to inquire about other Florida 4-H Tailgating Day Camps and to register for the District Contest.  For more information, visit these sites:

 

PG

Author: bestevez – bestevez@ufl.edu

UF/IFAS Extension Escambia County 4-H Coordinator

bestevez

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/06/24/4-h-tailgate-cookery-contest/

Exciting Updates for the 4-H Horticultural ID Contest

4-H Judging Contests, like horticulture identification, teach essential life skills for work and personal success.

Horticulture is one of our state’s leading industries, and for decades, the 4-H Horticulture ID contest has helped youth learn about this industry and demonstrate mastery of horticultural identification skills.  Even if a youth does not pursue a career in the horticultural industry, learning the material for this contest can benefit them in other ways.  To learn more about how judging teams teach workforce skills, check out this previous blogpost.  

This year, the State 4-H Horticulture Judging Contest received an extreme makeover, to expand the program to even more youth.  The state contest was held this past Saturday, June 10th at the Hillsborough County Extension Office in Tampa, FL (previously, the contest was held in Gainesville during 4-H University and was only open to 4-H seniors).  For the first time ever, the contest is now open to youth between the ages of 8 and 18 (juniors, intermediates, and seniors).  Study materials were adapted and revised to be age appropriate, and a webinar for coaches was offered.  The webinar was archived and can still be viewed by anyone interest in coaching a team.

There are five parts to the contest:

  • Woody Ornamentals identification
  • Flowers and Foliage identification
  • Fruits and Nut identification
  • Vegetable identification
  • Judging classes (youth look at a group of four fruits, plants, vegetables or nuts and rank them from best quality to poorest quality).

The contest is organized by a group of University of Florida Extension Specialists and volunteers.  In addition to the resources online, youth can contact their local Master Gardener Program through their local UF IFAS County Extension Office for support.  Many master gardener volunteers are willing to help teach plant identification, and may be willing to serve as a coach for your club.  In fact, Master Gardeners can earn bonus points towards their state contest for helping 4-H clubs and teams prepare!

If this program interests you, sign up for 4-H!  4-H is open to youth ages 5-18.  Adults can join 4-H as volunteers.  Florida 4-H offers a variety of volunteer roles to fit your specific interests, skills and schedule.  For more info, visit http://florida4h.org or contact your local UF IFAS County Extension Office.

Helpful Links:

 

PG

Author: Heather Kent – hckent@ufl.edu

Heather Kent is the Regional Specialized 4-H Agent in the Northwest Extension District.

Heather Kent

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/06/15/exciting-updates-for-the-4-h-horticultural-id-contest/

Three Panhandle Farms Recognized through the 2016 SE Hay Contest

Three Panhandle Farms Recognized through the 2016 SE Hay Contest

Bill and Donna Conrad, Bascom were recognized for their 3rd place alfalfa hay entry in the 2016 SE Hay Contest. Photo credit: Doug Mayo

Bill and Donna Conrad, Bascom, FL were recognized for their 3rd place alfalfa hay entry in the 2016 SE Hay Contest with an RFQ score of 238. Dr. Dennis Hancock, UGA Forage Specialist (right)  coordinated the 12th annual contest and recognized the winners at the Sunbelt Ag Expo in Moultrie Georgia.  Photo credit: Doug Mayo

The 2016 Southeastern Hay Contest (SEHC) presented by Massey Ferguson was a fierce competition, with 269 entries vying for the top spot. Three Florida Panhandle Farms were recognized for excellent quality hay:  Bill Conrad, Bascom had the third place entry in the alfalfa division with an RFQ score of 238, and Stoltzfus Farms, Blountstown  RFQ-168 and Basford Farms, Grand Ridge RFQ-155 placed first and second in the perennial peanut division.

Stoltzfus Farms, Blountstown was recognized for the 1st place perennial peanut hay entry in the SE Hay Contest. Photo credit: Doug Mayo

Stoltzfus Farms, Blountstown, FL was recognized for the 1st place perennial peanut hay entry in the SE Hay Contest with an RFQ score of 168. Photo credit: Doug Mayo

Final results for the 2016 SE Hay Contest are listed below:2016-se-hay-contest-results

The results are broken down into the Contest’s categories of the contest: warm season perennial grass hay (bermudagrass, bahiagrass), alfalfa hay, perennial peanut hay, perennial cool season grass (tall fescue, orchardgrass, etc.) hay, mixed and annual grass hay, grass baleage, legume baleage, and high moisture legume or grass-legume mix hay. This contest is held in conjunction with the Sunbelt Agricultural Expo in Moultrie, GA. Winners were announced during the opening ceremonies at the Sunbelt Expo on Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016. In each of the categories, the highest three entries in terms of relative forage quality (RFQ) received cash prizes. First place received $ 125, second received $ 75, and the third place entry received $ 50. Top honors in terms of highest overall RFQ also received their choice of the use of a new Massey Ferguson DM Series disc mower or RK Series rotary rake for the 2016 hay production season plus $ 1,000 in cash! This year, the overall high RFQ was 254, which was from some extremely high quality alfalfa made at Bohlen and Son Farm in Madison, GA.

Boheln & Son Farms was the overall grand prize winner with their 1st place alfalfa hay entry with an RFQ score of 254. Photo credit: Doug Mayo

Boheln & Son Farm, Madison, GA was the overall grand prize winner with their 1st place alfalfa hay entry with an RFQ score of 254. Photo credit: Doug Mayo

Weather is always a major limiting factor when attempting to produce high quality forage. This year, dry conditions throughout most of the growing season caused drought to be a major limitation for many producers. Drought stress increased the incidence of high nitrate levels in the forage in 2016, and 9% of the samples submitted to the contest were disqualified because nitrates were greater than 5,000 ppm. Still, the forage quality this year was very high. The average relative forage quality (RFQ) was on par with, or equal to, the winning values in the Contest’s 12-year history. Good management can make a remarkable improvement in forage quality in both favorable and unfavorable weather conditions.

What is Relative Forage Quality?

In the past, hay quality prediction equations were based on the fiber concentration of the hay crop. However, forage crops can have similar fiber content yet have very different digestibility. For instance, Tifton 85 bermudagrass often has a higher fiber concentration than other bermudagrass varieties, yet it is more digestible. This improved digestibility results in enhanced animal performance, but is not reflected using traditional forage testing methods. The Relative Forage Quality index was developed by the University of Florida and the University of Wisconsin to predict the fiber digestibility and animal intake of harvested crops. Since 2003, hundreds of warm season samples have been used to refine the RFQ equation for bermudagrass and other warm season forages. Currently, all forage sample results from the UGA’s Feed and Environmental Water Lab in Athens contain an estimate of Relative Forage Quality. This value is a single, easy to interpret number that improves producer understanding of a forage’s nutritive quality and helps in establishing a fair market value for the product.

How can Relative Forage Quality help me?

Relative Forage Quality allows hay producers to easily categorize and price hay lots based on relative quality. Producers can purchase hay lots depending on its end use. For example, there is little need to feed high-quality hay to livestock that could easily utilize poorer quality forage. Hay with a RFQ of 100 or more can usually be economically fed to maintain beef cows, while hay with an RFQ of 125-150 is adequate for stocker cattle or young growing replacement heifers, and hay with an RFQ of 140-160 is suitable for dairy cattle in the first three months of lactation. It is also easy to see that Relative Forage Quality could provide the framework for a quality hay marketing system. For example, hay with a RFQ of 155 could conceptually be labeled “premium” hay, while hay with an RFQ of 100 could be labeled “fair.” This simple system could allow producers to price hay consistently and fairly across harvest maturity, fertilization regimes, or plant species (i.e. bermudagrass, bahiagrass, perennial peanut, or tall fescue).

For more information on the SE Hay Contest, other upcoming events, and forage management issues, visit www.georgiaforages.com or contact your local County Extension Office.

 

Source: Dr. Dennis Hancock, Associate Professor and Forage Extension Specialist

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/10/22/three-panhandle-farms-recognized-through-the-2016-se-hay-contest/

Announcing the 4-H Tailgating Cookery Contest

The 4-H Tailgating Contest is a great way to learn about nutrition and food safety.

The 4-H Tailgating Contest is a fun way to learn about nutrition and food safety.

The “unofficial start of summer” was Memorial Day and nothing makes me think of summer more than the sounds and yummy smells of grilling out with family and friends.  Not only do I get to spend time with the people I love, but I also have the added benefit adding protein to our diets using low calorie preparation methods and cuts of meat or seafood.

So what’s the connection between grilling out and 4-H?  Florida 4-H is excited to introduce the First Annual 4-H Tailgating Contest.  To get youth ready for the contest, many of our counties in the Northwest District will be hosting summer day camps.  Youth will learn step by step how to choose the equipment needed to grill, how to build the fire and how to stay safe while grilling.  They will also learn about beef, poultry, seafood and pork and how to select the right cuts of meats for grilling.  A big part of grilling is enhancing the flavor of meats, so they’ll learn how to make rubs, sauces and marinades as well as the time needed to grill meats to bring out the best flavor.

This program was developed by a team of 4-H faculty led by Dr. Chad Carr, Associate Professor and Meat Science Specialist at the University of Florida.  When asked what inspired him to develop this program, he shared:

“Tailgating is popular- when the weather is good people enjoy cooking outside.  It’s also a great way to promote animal protein in the diet to combat childhood obesity by improving youth’s nutritional knowledge and food preparation skills.  Last but not least, this program will impart knowledge about safe handling and proper degree of doneness to ensure safe and palatable meat dishes.”

After county day camps, youth have the opportunity to participate in a district level contest (July 23rd) where they can earn their way to the Florida 4-H Tailgating Contest.  Grilling out while you “tailgate” is a tradition before football games, so the state contest will take place on September 10th before the Gators take on the University of Kentucky in The Swamp.  An awards reception sponsored by Sonny’s and Winn Dixie and an interview during the Gator Pre-Game Show will be the highlight of the contest.

Besides one of the obvious benefits to 4-H membership of learning new skills, 4-H youth are two times more likely to make healthier choices and participate in science programs outside of school time when compared to other youth programs.  So join us as we light our grills up and find new ways to grow Florida 4-H!

Day Camp Dates and Locations:

Contact your local UF IFAS County Extension Office to inquire about other Florida 4-H Tailgating Day Camps and to register for the District Contest.  For more information, visit these sites:

 

PG

Author: Julie Pigott Dillard – juliepd@ufl.edu

Julie Pigott Dillard is the 4-H Youth Development Agent in Washington County..

Julie Pigott Dillard

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/06/03/announcing-the-4-h-tailgating-cookery-contest/

2016 Southeast Hay Contest open for Entry

2016 Southeast Hay Contest open for Entry

SE Hay Contest graphicThere are many economic reasons why southeastern forage growers have increased the quality of the forage they produce (great demand for their products, need for efficiency due to high input costs, etc.). But, the keys to success have been timely management, improved forage varieties, advanced harvest equipment, and related technologies that have come to the market over the last 10 years.  It is hard to recall a more exciting time in the hay and forage industry!  If you do a good job producing high quality forage, why not send in samples for analysis to prove it to your customers?  Who knows, you may have produced some of the best hay or baleage in the Southeast in 2016?

Since 2004, the Southeastern Hay Contest has been spotlighting high quality hay and baleage produced in the Southeast. The SE Hay Contest is run in conjunction with the Sunbelt Ag Expo, with the winners announced each year on the first day of the Expo. Our goal is to demonstrate the potential to produce high quality hay and baleage, showcase the management abilities of our SE growers, and highlight the technology and equipment that make it all possible!

Building on the success of the first 11 years of this annual event, we are excited to announce that Massey Ferguson will be the title sponsor for the 2016 SE Hay Contest! They will be providing the Grand Prize of a new Massey Ferguson RK Series rotary rake or new DM Series Professional disc mower for the 2017 hay production season AND a $ 1000 cash prize!  Each of the 9 categories will also be sponsored by more of our industry partners (see our sponsors page). Their sponsorship will provide cash awards to the top 3 places in each category (1st prize $ 125, 2nd prize $ 75, and 3rd prize $ 50)!

So, is your hay and baleage the class of the field? Think you can vie for a winning combination? If so, utilize the links below and start sending in your best forage samples today! The deadline for entry into the SE Hay Contest is 5 p.m. on Monday, September 22, 2016.  Even if you don’t take home a cash prize, you will still have the lab test results from each sample to share with your customers.  It is a win:win situation.

While you’re at it, take time to advertise your high quality forage in the 2016 SE Hay Directory. The SE Hay Directory seeks to connect our high quality forage producers with buyers who value quality tested forages. Read more about the SE Hay Directory by downloading the rules and entry forms.

SE Hay Contest Website

2016 SE Hay Contest Rules and Entry Form

 

SE Hay Contest Logos

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/05/14/2016-southeast-hay-contest-open-for-entry/

Two Panhandle Farms Recognized through the 2015 Southeast Hay Contest

Two Panhandle Farms Recognized through the 2015 Southeast Hay Contest

The Southeastern Hay Contest winners were announced this week.  There were 375 total entries in the contest this year (185 in 2014).  Hay and baleage samples were ranked based on their Relative Forage Quality score (RFQ).  The contest was divided into seven categorizes:  warm season perennial grass hay (bermudagrass, bahiagrass),alfalfa hay, perennial peanut hay, perennial cool season grass (tall fescue, orchardgrass, etc.) hay, mixed and annual grass hay, grass baleage, and legume baleage.

Winners were announced during the opening ceremonies at the Sunbelt Ag Expo on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2015. In each of the seven categories, the highest three entries in terms of relative forage quality (RFQ) received cash prizes. First place received $ 125, second place $ 75, and third place $ 50. The highest overall RFQ score received the use of a new Massey Ferguson DM RK Series rotary rake for the 2016 hay production season, plus $ 1000 in cash!  Top honors in the warm season perennial grass hay category also receive the use of a new Massey Ferguson DM Series Professional disc mower for the 2016 hay production season!

McGee Ranch in Idalou, TX was the 2015 overall SE Hay Contest winner with an entry of extremely high quality alfalfa hay that maxed out the RFQ index at 300.

McGee Ranch in Idalou, TX was the 2015 overall SE Hay Contest winner with an entry of extremely high quality alfalfa hay that maxed out the RFQ index at 300.

The 2015 overall contest winner was McGee Ranch, Idalou, TX with an RFQ score over 300, which was from some extremely high quality alfalfa hay.  The winner of the warm season perennial grass hay category was Yon Family Farms from Ridge Spring,SC who had an RFQ of 161.

Yon Family Farms, Ridge Spring, SC was the winner of the warm season perennial grass hay category with a Coastal Bermudagrass hay entry with an RFQ score of 161.

Yon Family Farms, Ridge Spring, SC was the winner of the warm season perennial grass hay category with a Coastal Bermudagrass hay entry with an RFQ score of 161.

The Florida Panhandle was represented well by two perennial peanut hay operations.  Justin Williams, Bonifay had the top Perennial Peanut Hay entry with an RFQ score of 179.  Steve & Seth Basford, Grand Ridge had the 2nd place Perennial Peanut Hay entry with an RFQ score of 157.

Justin Williams, Bonifay had the top Perennial Peanut Hay entry with an RFQ score of 179.

Justin Williams, Bonifay had the top Perennial Peanut Hay entry with an RFQ score of 179.

Steve Basford 2015 Perennial peanut hay 2nd place

Steve & Seth Basford, Grand Ridge had the 2nd place Perennial Peanut Hay entry with an RFQ score of 157.

SE Hay Contest header2015 Southeast Hay Contest Winners

2015 SE Hay Contest Winners

Weather is always a major limiting factor when attempting to produce high quality forage. This year, dry conditions in the middle part of the growing season caused drought to be a major limitation for many producers. Drought stress increased the incidence of high nitrate levels in the forage in 2015. In fact, 11.5% of the samples submitted to the contest were disqualified because nitrates were greater than 5000 ppm. Still, the forage quality this year was very high. The average relative forage quality (RFQ) was on par with or equal to the highest values in the Contest’s 11-year history. Good management can make a remarkable improvement in forage quality in both favorable and unfavorable weather conditions.

What is Relative Forage Quality (RFQ)?

In the past, hay quality prediction equations were based on the fiber concentration of the hay crop. However, forage crops can have similar fiber content yet have very different digestibility. For instance, Tifton 85 bermudagrass often has a higher fiber concentration than other bermudagrass varieties, yet it is more digestible. This improved digestibility results in enhanced animal performance, but is not reflected using traditional forage testing methods. The Relative Forage Quality index was developed by the University of Florida and the University of Wisconsin to predict the fiber digestibility and animal intake of harvested crops.  Since 2003, hundreds of warm season samples have been used to refine the RFQ equation for bermudagrass and other warm season forages. Currently, all forage sample results from the UGA Feed and Forage Testing Lab in Athens contain an estimate of Relative Forage Quality. This value is a single, easy to interpret number that improves producer understanding of a forage’s nutritive quality and helps in establishing a fair market value for the product.

How can Relative Forage Quality help you?

Relative Forage Quality allows hay producers to easily categorize and price hay lots based on relative quality. Producers can purchase hay lots depending on its end use. For example, there is little need to feed high-quality hay to livestock that could easily utilize poorer quality forage. Hay with an RFQ of 115-130 can be fed to maintain beef cow-calf pairs, hay with an RFQ of 125-150 is adequate for stocker cattle or young growing replacement heifers, and hay with an RFQ of 140-160 is suitable for dairy cattle in the first three months of lactation. It is also easy to see that Relative Forage Quality could provide the framework for a quality hay marketing system. For example, hay with a RFQ of 155 could conceptually be labeled “premium” hay, while hay with an RFQ of 105 could be labeled “fair.”  This simple system could allow producers to price hay consistently and fairly across harvest maturity, fertilization regimes, or plant species (i.e. bermudagrass, bahiagrass, perennial peanut, or tall fescue).

Source:  Dennis Hancock, UGA Extension Forage Specialist and SE Hay Contest Chairman

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Jackson County Extension Director, Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/10/24/two-panhandle-farms-recognized-through-the-2015-southeast-hay-contest/

New Sponsorship Adds Major Boost to Southeast Hay Contest

15 SE HAY contest graphicSince 2004, the Southeastern Hay Contest has been spotlighting high quality hay and baleage production in the Southeast. The SE Hay Contest is run in conjunction with the Sunbelt Ag Expo and our winners are announced each year on the first day of the Expo.

The goal of the contest is to demonstrate the potential to produce high quality hay and baleage, showcase the management abilities of our southeastern growers, and highlight the technology and equipment that make it all possible! There are many economic reasons why southeastern growers have increased the quality of the forage they produce (e.g., unprecedented prices in the livestock sectors, great demand for their products, need for efficiency due to high input costs, etc.). But, the keys to success have been timely management, improved forage varieties, advanced harvest equipment, and related technologies that have come to the market over the last 10 years.  It is hard to recall a more exciting time in the hay and forage industry!

Building on the success of the first 10 years of this annual event, new sponsorships have really made participation even more attractive for hay and baleage producers!  Plus, perennial peanut and alfalfa now each have their own categories, so everyone will be competing with the same species.

SE Hay Contest Categories

Hay or baleage samples will be competing in one of the seven categories and ranked based on RFQ scores.

To qualify for entry to the SE Hay Contest, the producer and submitting Extension Agent must complete the Contest Entry Form. This form, along with a $ 17 check ($ 15 for the testing fee plus $ 2 for Hay Contest entry fee) made payable to UGA FEW Lab, MUST BE SUBMITTED SIMULTANEOUSLY to:

Southeastern Hay Contest
Feed and Environmental Water Lab (FEW)
2300 College Station Road Athens, Georgia 30602-4356

All Entries Must Be Received by the FEW Lab by:
5 p.m. on Monday, September 28, 2015

Download RULES and ENTRY FORM: 2015 SE HAY CONTEST

So, is your hay and baleage the class of the field? Think you can vie for a winning combination? If so, then check out the rules and entry forms and enter today! The deadline for entry into the SE Hay Contest is 5 p.m. on Monday, September 28, 2015.

While you’re at it, take time to advertise your high quality forage in the 2015 SE Hay Directory. The SE Hay Directory seeks to connect our high quality forage producers with buyers who value this product. Read more about the SE Hay Directory on page 4 of the SE Hay Contest and Hay Directory Rules and Entry Form.

The Southeast Hay Contest has a new website as well:  https://sehaycontest.wordpress.com/

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Jackson County Extension Director, Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/04/25/new-sponsorship-adds-major-boost-to-southeast-hay-contest/

1st Annual Statewide Nonnative Fish Catch, Click, and Submit Contest

1st Annual Statewide Nonnative Fish Catch, Click, and Submit Contest

The Everglades Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (ECISMA) is organizing a nonnative freshwater fishing tournament for Invasive Species Week.

 

Begins:             6:00 AM Saturday February 21, 2015

Ends:               12:00 AM Sunday March 1, 2015

 

OBJECTIVES FOR TOURNAMENT

  • Document the distribution of freshwater nonnative fish in Florida
  • Increase awareness of the problem with nonnative freshwater fish
  • Encourage anglers to target nonnative species

 

RULES FOR TOURNAMENT

  • All anglers must register on EDDMaps – this is easy… visit http://eddmaps.org/
  • When recording on EDDMaps all data must complete with exact location (GPS preferred) and include a photo. Photos should have fish flat on a light colored background, in shade if possible, head facing left, and extend the fins as much as possible.
  • The boundaries for the tournament are all legally fished freshwater bodies of water in Florida
  • All fish must be caught within compliance with the State of Florida regulations. Visit MyFWC.com/fishing/freshwater/regulations or visit a local bait and tackle shop for these.
  • Native species are not eligible

 

PRIZES FOR TOURNAMENT

Most Unusual Catch – Adult

  • First Prize – $ 75 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt
  • Second Prize – $ 50 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt
  • Third Prize – $ 25 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt

Most Species – Adult

  • First Prize – $ 75 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt
  • Second Prize – $ 50 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt
  • Third Prize – $ 25 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt

Most Unusual Catch – Youth

  • First Prize – $ 50 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt
  • Second Prize – $ 25 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt
  • Third Prize – $ 15 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt

Most Species – Youth

  • First Prize – $ 50 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt
  • Second Prize – $ 25 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt
  • Third Prize – $ 15 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt

 

For a list of nonnative targets you can visit EDDMaps.com, MyFWC.com, or contact your local county Extension office. We encourage all participants to take and eat what you catch.

 

DISCLAIMER

It is expressly understood that participants in the 2015 Nonnative Fish Catch, Click, and Submit enter at their own risk and that Everglades CISMA and all participating organizations, Officers, Event Sponsors, and Committees, and all other persons connected directly or indirectly with the operation of said event, shall be exempt from any liability for liable, slander, loss, damage, negligence, harm, injury, or death suffered by any participant, entrant, vessel, and equipment, companions, and guests, boat captains, mates, or crew members, which may occur in conjunction with the 2015 Nonnative Fish Catch, Click, and Submit.

 

For more information contact ECISMA at http://evergladescisma.org/.

PG

Author: Rick O’Connor – roc1@ufl.edu

Sea Grant Extension Agent in Escambia County

Rick O’Connor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/02/20/1st-annual-statewide-nonnative-fish-catch-click-and-submit-contest/

2014 Southeast Hay Contest Results

2014 Southeast Hay Contest Results

NFREC Hay Bales in Field

There were 185 entries in the 2014 Southeastern Hay Contest. Not only were there more samples sent in this year, but thanks to more favorable weather, the quality of the samples was better as well.  Photo credit: Doug Mayo

Dennis Hancock, UGA Forage Extension Specialist and SE Hay Contest Coordinator

The Southeast Hay Contest celebrated its 10th year in 2014.  This contest is a cooperative extension effort of Auburn University, Clemson University, the University of Florida, and the University of Georgia, held in conjunction with the Sunbelt Agricultural Expo in Moultrie, GA.The number of entries in the Southeastern Hay Contest increased dramatically this year, as compared to previous years. In 2014, 185 entries were sent in to the contest, compared to only 109 entries in 2013.
Category winners for the 2014 Southeastern Hay Contest are listed in Table 1 below. The results are broken down into the six categories of the contest: warm season perennial grass hay (bermudagrass, bahiagrass), perennial peanut and alfalfa hay, perennial cool season grass (tall fescue, orchardgrass, etc.), mixed and annual grass hay,grass baleage, and legume baleage categories. Samples were ranked based on their Relative Forage Quality (RFQ) indexes.
Weather is always a major limiting factor when attempting to produce high quality forage. This year, dry conditions in the later half of the growing season caused drought to be a major limitation. Drought stress increased the incidence of high nitrate levels in the forage in 2014. Still, the forage quality was much higher than in 2013,when near daily rainfall greatly limited the SE hay producer’s ability to harvest good quality forage. The average relative forage quality (RFQ) was higher in each category in 2014, compared to last year’s results. Also, the winning entries from each category were much improved in 2014! Good management can make a remarkable improvement in forage quality in both favorable and unfavorable weather conditions.SE Hay Contest Results

What is Relative Forage Quality (RFQ)?

In the past, hay quality prediction equations were based on the fiber concentration of the hay crop. However, forage crops can have similar fiber content yet have very different digestibility. For instance, Tifton 85 bermudagrass often has a higher fiber concentration than other bermudagrass varieties, yet it is more digestible. This improved digestibility results in enhanced animal performance, but is not reflected using traditional forage testing methods. The Relative Forage Quality index was developed by the University of Florida and the University of Wisconsin to predict the fiber digestibility and animal intake of harvested crops. Since 2003, hundreds of warm season samples have been used to refine the RFQ equation for bermudagrass and other warm season forages. Currently, all forage sample results from the UGA Feed and Forage Testing Lab in Athens contain an estimate of Relative Forage Quality. This value is a single, easy to interpret number that improves producer understanding of a forage’s nutritive quality and helps in establishing a fair market value for the product.

How can Relative Forage Quality help me?

Relative Forage Quality allows hay producers to easily categorize and price hay lots based on relative quality.  Producers can purchase hay lots depending on its end use. For example there is little need to feed high-quality hay to livestock that could easily utilize poorer quality forage. Hay with a RFQ of 115-130 can be fed to maintain beef cow-calf pairs, hay with an RFQ of 125-150 is adequate for stocker cattle or young growing replacement heifers, and hay with an RFQ of 140-160 is suitable for dairy cattle in the first three months of lactation. It is also easy to see that Relative Forage Quality could provide the framework for a quality hay marketing system. For example, hay with a RFQ of 155 could conceptually be labeled “premium” hay, while hay with an RFQ of 105 could be labeled “fair”. This simple system could allow producers to price hay consistently and fairly across harvest maturity, fertilization regimes, or plant species (i.e. bermudagrass, bahiagrass, perennial peanut, or tall fescue).

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

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Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/10/25/2014-southeast-hay-contest-results/

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