Tag Archive: Corn

Corn Disease Management: When to Apply a Fungicide?

Corn Disease Management: When to Apply a Fungicide?

Southern Rust in field corn at the UF/IFAS Plant Research Center, Citra. Photo: Nick Dufualt.

By Nicholas Dufault and Maria C. Velez-Climent, UF/IFAS Plant Pathology Department

Recently, southern corn rust (Puccinia polysora) (Figure 1) was identified in Seminole County, Georgia and southern Alabama. With so many cloudy, and rainy days lately many producers have been asking if it would be beneficial to spray a fungicide? Spraying at the right time can be useful in protecting yields, especially with diseases like northern corn leaf blight and southern rust, which spread quickly and cause significant yield losses, if left untreated. So, when is the right time to spray?

Figure 1. Typical southern corn rust signs (left) with orange to light brown, small and densely packed pustules on the surface on the top of the leaf. But, the underside of the leaf surface has yellow flecks and very few, if any, pustules. (Right)

The choice of whether or not to apply a fungicide will vary depending on several key questions. These are:

  • What is your yield potential?
  • What are the variety’s resistance traits?
  • What is the current growth stage of the corn?
  • Is disease present in the field or locally?
  • Was a fungicide already applied?

It is critical to assess how the potential yield savings from a fungicide application will affect your budget, and if resistant traits are present for the disease of interest. Budget tools, such as UGA’s corn budget, can be very helpful in this decision process. Fungicides can usually save between 5 and 10 bushels per acre, but these values can vary depending on the amount of disease present in the field. Thus, it will be critical to evaluate a range of yield savings and the impacts they will have on the overall returns.

Growth stage is also important when considering the benefits of a fungicide application. An application in the V-stages can reduce disease severity in corn (Figure 2), but often does not lead to significant yield increases (Figure 3). In general, fungicide applications around VT (Tassel) to R2 (Blister) provide the best yield savings. There are situations where sprays outside these growth stages can be beneficial and further information about growth stage timing can be found at your local extension office.

Figure 2. Box plots of disease severity ratings for southern corn rust with fungicides sprays at V5 and VT for the products indicated. The variety was Dekalb DKC66-97.

Figure 3. Yield savings in bu/A for Priaxor (4 fl oz/A) and Headline AMP (10 fl oz/A) when compared to the untreated control for single sprays at V5 and VT. Southern corn rust was the primary disease present with severity values presented in Figure 2.

The timing of the first fungicide application and deciding whether or not to apply a second application requires gathering some information about the disease. If the disease is present in the field or locally (e.g. neighboring county) and environmental conditions are conducive for disease development, a fungicide spray has a high probability of saving corn yields. Monitoring corn diseases should be primarily done through scouting, however, there are multiple resources available to help with corn disease monitoring (e.g. blogs, extension newsletter and Twitter). The decision of a second fungicide application depends on when the first application was applied, the growth stage of the crop and if conditions remain conducive for disease. Basically, it requires going through all the questions again, and assessing the impact and duration of protection from the first fungicide. About two weeks after the first application is a rough time estimate to begin considering a second application and evaluating the impacts of a fungicide spray.

The final choice to make is which product to use. Luckily, there are many quality products available for corn diseases and this choice depends on which and how many diseases are present. For general insights on product efficacy, the fungicide efficacy guide provided by the Corn Disease Working Group is a great resource. Corn fungicide application decisions can be difficult to make. If the answers to the questions above indicate a high risk for disease, it is important not to hesitate when making a decision to spray fungicides, especially since southern corn rust and northern corn leaf blight can spread quickly in the right situations.

 

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Author: Nick Dufault – nsdufault@ufl.edu

Extension Plant Pathologist for Vegetable and Row Crops
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Field-Veg-Plant-Pathology-Lab-at-UF/510711278961763?sk=timeline

Nick Dufault

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/07/04/corn-disease-management-when-to-apply-a-fungicide/

Evaluation of ESN Controlled Release Fertilizer for Florida Corn Production

Environmentally Smart Nitrogen (ESN) corn trial at the UF/IFAS West Florida Research and Education Center in Jay, FL. Photo: Mike Mulvaney

Dr. Michael J. Mulvaney, Cropping Systems Specialist, WFREC, Jay, FL

Now is the time to start thinking about nitrogen (N) management strategies for corn production in the Panhandle.  This is a follow-up to the March 2016 article:  Environmentally Smart Nitrogen (ESN) as a Controlled-release Nitrogen source for Cotton, or ESN for cotton production.  Researchers now have data on the use of ESN for corn production in Florida.

ESN is a polymer-coated urea formulated as 44-0-0. The reason it contains 2% less N than urea (which is 46-0-0) is due to the weight of the polymer coating.  ESN is commercially available in bulk in some parts of the Panhandle.  Many growers blend ESN with urea, commonly as a 50-50 mix, with the idea that some N is immediately available, while the rest will release slowly over time to “spoon feed” the crop.

How slowly does ESN release N?

The release of N from ESN is temperature dependent under controlled conditions.  That is, the higher the temperature, the faster the release.  So, it stands to reason that ESN release should be slower at corn pre-plant as compared to corn sidedress application.  Likewise, we should see different N release if we broadcast as compared to incorporating ESN.  UF Researchers took this out of the lab, and measured the release rates under field conditions at Jay and Citra, FL during the 2015 and 2016 growing seasons.

The Florida data showed that ESN releases 50% N in approximately 2-5 weeks, with broadcast applications releasing N slower than incorporated ESN.

But does it make a difference in yield?

We used different ESN:urea blends at different times (all pre-plant, or 25% N pre-plant with 75% N sidedress) under corn production at two sites across the Panhandle during 2015 and 2016.  These corn trials were all fertilized at 183 lbs N/ac (except the control, of course) – the only differences were in how it was applied.

Figure 1. Corn grain yields using various ESN:urea blends, applied either all pre-plant or using a 25% N pre-plant, 75% N sidedress split application. 183 lbs N/ac were applied to all plots except the control.

Yield differences were not statistically significant among any of the application treatments.

Cost

Global urea prices are near 5-year lows, but are about the same price as last year (Figure 2).  Locally sourced urea in March of 2016 was selling at $ 380/ton, and ESN was $ 600/ton.  That’s a 65% increase per unit of N for ESN over urea.  March 2015 prices were $ 560/ton urea and $ 687/ton ESN, an increase of 28% per unit of N over urea.  It is expected that prices in March 2017 will be slightly higher those in March 2016.

Figure 2. Global urea prices over the past five years.

Break even cost

If corn prices are $ 3.60/bushel, and 200 lbs N were applied, you would need a 15 bu/ac yield increase to break even for the additional cost of ESN over urea.  If only half of the N was applied as ESN, a 7.5 bu/ac yield increase would be needed to break even.

Summary

During corn production in the Florida Panhandle, 50% of N release can be expected in 2-5 weeks, depending on timing and placement. Although controlled release of N may lead to increased N use efficiency, there was no evidence of significant yield differences among blends, or timing of applications when applied at 183 lbs N/ac at either Jay, FL (a sandy loam) or Citra, FL (sand).

Advantages over urea:

  • It may limit the opportunity for N loss through volatilization, which may be useful under certain conditions where urea-N loss can be high (warm, moist, broadcast conditions). Research on N volatilization from ESN is underway through Dr. Cheryl Mackowiak’s program.
  • It stores better than urea. It won’t gum up unless prills are broken.

Disadvantages compared to urea:

  • It currently costs 65% more per unit of N than urea.
  • In a heavy rainfall, broadcast ESN can be pushed into low spots in the immediate area. You can incorporate ESN to help avoid this, particularly if you are on a slope.
  • ESN should be handled with reasonable care. Damaged prills are as good as urea but considerably more expensive. When the front-end loader scoops from the bottom of the pile, significant damage can occur to the polymer coating.  Also, broadcast applications can damage prills with contact to spreader fins.  Incorporation of ESN may damage prills as well, which may explain why incorporated N release was faster than broadcast N release.

    ESN prills washed into localized low spots after a heavy rain in 2016. Photo: Mike Mulvaney

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Author: Michael Mulvaney – m.mulvaney@ufl.edu

Cropping Systems Specialist, University of Florida, West Florida Research and Education Center, Jay, FL. Follow me @TheDirtDude
http://wfrec.ifas.ufl.edu/people/faculty/dr-michael-mulvaney/

Michael Mulvaney

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/13/evaluation-of-esn-controlled-release-fertilizer-for-florida-corn-production/

2016 Corn Variety Trial Summary from Jay, Florida

Photo: Tyler Jones.

Santa Rosa County is not a major corn producer, as compared to the Midwest, but farmers there do grow 600-800 acres of field corn each year. These producers plant corn as a summer rotational crop, some for cattle feed, and a significant acreage is planted and sold to our wildlife enthusiasts.

The University of Florida/IFAS, West Florida Research and Education Center (WFREC) in Jay conducted a corn variety trial in 2016, consisting of 27 field corn entries. These data represent only one year, so results should be considered over several locations and years, before conclusions are valid.

In addition there is a multi-year summary of varieties that have been evaluated for two and three years, that demonstrate variety performance over multiple years.

For the complete report, use the following link:

http://wfrec.ifas.ufl.edu/media/wfrecifasufledu/docs/pdf/2016-Evaluation-of-Field-Corn-Varieties-in-Jay—Report—Final.pdf

 

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Author: John Doyle Atkins – srcextag@ufl.edu

John Doyle Atkins is the Agricultural Agent in Santa Rosa County.

John Doyle Atkins

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/12/17/2016-corn-variety-trial-summary-from-jay-florida/

Alabama Corn and Wheat Short Course – December 12-13

You are invited to participate in the 2016 Alabama Corn and Wheat Short Course. As in previous years, the short course will take place at the Hotel at Auburn University. The event is scheduled for December 12th ( all day) and 13th (morning). We will have a great group of speakers and topics. The short course is free, but we ask that you please register as soon as possible. The hotel will also have rooms available at a special room rate. CCAs/CEUs will be also available. Please feel free to share this information with other farmers or colleagues.

The registration link is provided below:

https://auburn.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_9vng9pQn1D6XCeh

corn_2016-short-course

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Author: Libbie Johnson – libbiej@ufl.edu

Agriculture agent at UF IFAS Escambia County Extension.
http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/

Libbie Johnson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/10/29/alabama-corn-and-wheat-short-course-december-12-13/

Corn Harvest Underway in Jackson County

The combine was running hard harvesting field corn this week near Greenwood, FL at Bishop Farms.

This combine was running hard harvesting field corn this week near Greenwood, FL at Bishop Farms.

Harvest is always an exciting time on the farm.  Months of work, investment, and risk pay off when the crop comes in.  This week several farms in Jackson County started harvesting field corn from both dryland and irrigated fields. Reported yields for dryland fields ranged from 90-130 bushels per acre.  Irrigated corn yields ranged from 200-280 bushels per acre.  It appears that yields will be off a little this year, slightly below average, due to the several weeks of hot dry weather at the end of June and early July.

Ethan Carter, Regional Crop IMP Agent, measured corn to calculate corn yields at Bishop Farms.

Ethan Carter, Regional Crop IMP Agent, measured corn to calculate corn yields at Bishop Farms.

Ethan Carter, Crop IMP Regional Agent, did some yield checks at Bishop Farms at a cornfield near Greenwood, Florida.  Dekalb 6659 was the variety that provided excellent yields in this field.

The National Corn Growers Association offers a national corn yield contest.  For this contest, yields have to be evaluated by an unbiased third party such as your County Extension Agriculture Agent.  The deadline for entry this year was today, July 29, 2016.

Even if you missed the entry deadline for the national contest, doing some spot yield checks is just good information to have.  Typically, yield checks are more accurate than the yield monitors provided in combines.  Having accurate yield records for different varieties can help determine the best varieties to plant in the future.  It also provides valuable information about management decisions made from year to year.  If you would like assistance doing spot yield checks of your field corn, contact your local county extension office.

The following are some highlights from Bishop Farms harvest this past week.  Not only are the harvest equipment running non-stop, but they are also prepping the land and planting a second crop of soybeans right behind the combine.  The first is a short video of the combine in action, and some photos of the process follow.

>>>

Bishop Corn Combine 2

Bishop Corn Buggy loadBishop Truck loadingBishop Soybean prep

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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/07/30/corn-harvest-underway-in-jackson-county/

UF/IFAS 2016 Corn Field Day July 19

UF/IFAS 2016 Corn Field Day July 19

Josh Thompson, UF/IFAS Regional Agronomy Agent and Kim Wilkens compare corn varieties at the West Florida Research and Education Center Variety Trial.

Josh Thompson and Kim Wilkens compare corn varieties at the West Florida Research and Education Center Variety Trial.

UF/IFAS Extension will host the annual Corn Field Day Tuesday, July 19 from 10 a.m. to noon at the UF/IFAS West Florida Research and Education Center, located at 4253 Experiment Road, Highway 182 in Jay. The event will feature 27 replicated corn varieties, and more than 15 corn variety demonstration plots, with varieties from Dyna-Gro, Monsanto-Dekalb, Croplan, Syngenta, Pioneer, Terral and Augusta Seed. Several company representatives will be on hand to provide overviews of their products, and attendees will take a field tour to see how the corn varieties are working at the West Florida Research and Education Center.

Topics for the Corn Field Day include:

  • Corn variety trial and demonstration

  • Application timing for corn production

Lunch will be provided. For meal planning purposes, please RSVP to the Jay Extension Office at (850) 675-3107 or the Escambia Extension Office at (850) 475-5230.

 

Josh Thompson, provides a corn yield check at farm in Jackson County this week. Photo credit: Doug Mayo

Conducting a corn yield check in Jackson County. Photo credit: Doug Mayo

 

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Author: Libbie Johnson – libbiej@ufl.edu

Agriculture agent at UF IFAS Escambia County Extension.
http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/

Libbie Johnson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/06/11/ufifas-2016-corn-field-day-july-19/

Environmentally Smart Nitrogen (ESN) as a Controlled-release Nitrogen source for Corn and Cotton

Urea on the left, ESN on the right. Photo credit: Mike Mulvaney

Urea on the left, ESN on the right. Photo credit: Mike Mulvaney

Dr. Michael J. Mulvaney, Cropping Systems Specialist, WFREC, Jay, FL

Environmentally Smart Nitrogen (ESN) is a polymer-coated urea formulated as 44-0-0. The reason it contains 2% less nitrogen (N) than urea (which is 46-0-0) is due to the weight of the polymer coating.  ESN is commercially available in bulk in some parts of the Panhandle.  Many growers blend ESN with standard urea, commonly as a 50-50 mix, to prevent nitrogen loss or leaching from urea based fertilizers.

How slowly does ESN release N?

The release of N from ESN is temperature dependent under controlled conditions.  That is, the higher the temperature, the faster the release.  So it stands to reason that ESN release should be slower at corn pre-plant compared to cotton pre-plant.  Likewise, we should see different N release if we broadcast compared to incorporate ESN.  Research trials were conducted to measure the release rates under field conditions at Jay and Citra, Florida during the 2015 growing season.

Mulvaney corn pre-plantUnder a corn pre-plant situation, it did not matter if ESN was buried (4 inches) or broadcast (on the surface). 50% of N was released in about 3 weeks, and 80% was released after 4 weeks.

 

Mulvaney Corn sidedress

At corn sidedress or cotton pre-plant, broadcast ESN released N slower than incorporated ESN.  Soil temperatures were measured.  As you might expect, surface temperatures were cooler than soil temperatures in the top four inches.  This explains the differences between broadcast and incorporated ESN. There was a 50%  N release in 3 weeks if buried, but after 5 weeks if broadcast. 80% release was achieved in 5 weeks when buried and after 10 weeks when broadcast.

Mulvaney cotton sidedress

During cotton sidedress, we found that broadcast and incorporated ESN released N at the same rate, as we did with corn pre-plant. 50% N was released in 2 weeks, and 80% was released in 5 weeks.

But does it make a difference in yield?

We used different ESN:urea blends at different times (all pre-plant, or 25% pre-plant with 75% sidedress) under cotton production at two sites in Florida in 2015.  Seed cotton yields did not show any obvious trends at either site in 2015.  Corn data will not be available until next year.

Mulvaney Cotton Yield Jay

Use mouse or touch screen to enlarge to full screen for easier reading

Use mouse or touch screen to enlarge to full screen for easier reading

Use mouse or touch screen to enlarge to full screen for easier reading

Checking ESN quality:

If you are interested in the quality of the ESN you’ve purchased, you can do the “24-hour water test.” Weigh some ESN, put it in a glass of water for 24 hours, then pour it out, dry it, and weigh it again.  The difference in weights is essentially the percentage of damaged prills.

Costs:

Global urea prices are at 5-year lows.  I called Crop Production Ssrvices (Jay, FL, March 31, 2016) today, and urea is selling at $ 380/ton, and ESN sells for $ 600/ton.  That’s a 65% increase per unit of N for ESN over urea.  In 2015, prices at CPS (Jay, FL, March 24, 2015) were $ 560/ton urea and $ 687/ton ESN, an increase of 28% per unit of N over urea.

Global urea prices over the past five years.

Global urea prices over the past five years.

Summary:

Keep in mind that these are preliminary data at two locations in Florida. Based on these preliminary results using ESN, growers can expect 50% of N release in 2-5 weeks depending on timing and placement. 80% release can be expected in 4-10 weeks.  Although controlled release of N should lead to increased N use efficiency, we were not able to pick up significant yield differences among blends or timing of applications.

Advantages over urea:

  • The release of N is more controlled than urea. This should mean increased N use efficiency.
  • Limits the opportunity for N loss through volatilization.
  • It stores better than urea. It won’t gum up unless prills are broken.

Disadvantages compared to urea:

  • It currently costs 65% more per unit of N than urea (CPS prices, Jay, FL, March 31, 2016)
  • In a heavy rainfall, broadcast ESN can be pushed into low spots in the immediate area. You can incorporate ESN to help avoid this, particularly if you are on a slope.
  • ESN should be handled with reasonable care. Damaged prills are as good as urea but considerably more expensive.  When the front-end loader scoops from the bottom of the pile, significant damage can occur to the polymer coating.

 

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Author: Michael Mulvaney – m.mulvaney@ufl.edu

Cropping Systems Specialist, University of Florida, West Florida Research and Education Center, Jay, FL
http://wfrec.ifas.ufl.edu/people/faculty/dr-michael-mulvaney/

Michael Mulvaney

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/04/02/environmentally-smart-nitrogen-esn-as-a-controlled-release-nitrogen-source-for-corn-and-cotton/

UF/IFAS Researchers Studying Corn Root Development in Florida’s Sandy Soils

Figure 1. Before mini-rhizotron tube was inserted, a GiddingsTM soil drilling rig creates a hole for the tube.

Figure 1. Before mini-rhizotron tube was inserted, a GiddingsTM soil drilling rig creates a hole for the tube.

Chaein Na and Diane Rowland, UF/IFAS Agronomy Department

University of Florida researchers conducted an extensive field trial recently to investigate the hidden half of the corn plant, namely the roots. An extensive root system is beneficial for nutrient scavenging and exploration of deep water sources in the soil. This is important for many regions in Florida, where nutrient leaching from agricultural areas causes numerous environmental concerns, plus increased fertilizer costs when supplemental applications must be made after heavy rains. Although the importance of the root system to plant growth and development should not be ignored, the great difficulty involved in studying and measuring roots in the field has led to a general lack of information and understanding at the field scale. However, the recent development of systems that can take images of crop roots in the field without disturbing the plant has opened up a new underground world.

Silage corn is a major feedstock for the Florida dairy industry, but like most crops, there is almost no information available about its root architecture and how it develops over the season. Recently, a field trial was set up at the Plant Science Research and Education Unit (PSREU) near Citra, Florida to investigate seasonal root development in silage corn. A commercial hybrid, ‘Agratech1023VIP’, was sown April 10, 2014. Transparent 6 foot long tubes (mini-rhizotrons) were inserted in the row at a 45 degree angle to the soil surface at three weeks after planting (figure 1). As the roots of the plant developed, they grew over the tube which allowed digital pictures to be taken of most of the root system down to almost three feet (figure 2). A locking mechanism on the tube allows the camera to capture images at the same locations over time, so corn root images were collected on five dates – May 16th, 30th, June 13th, July 25th and Sept 5th (figure 3).

Figure 2. Root image is being captured; Dr. Na is monitoring captured images (left), Mr. Carter Lambert, a UF student, is inserting camera in to the tube accordingly (right).

Figure 2. Root image is being captured; Dr. Na is monitoring captured images (left), Mr. Carter Lambert, a UF student, is inserting camera in to the tube accordingly (right).

Some interesting facts were found: the depth of the root system was over 20 inches by 30 days after planting (DAP) and reached the end of the tube (about 3 feet) by 60 DAP. The total root length produced averaged just 2 tenths of an inch of root for every square inch of soil in May but increased to over 3 inches of root for every square inch of soil by July (100 DAP). This root length was not equally distributed over the three feet of soil depth monitored, but the bulk of the root system was concentrated in the top 16 inches of soil throughout the season. Just like the plant above the soil, the roots clearly began to decay by September as the crop dried down prior to harvest.

Corn fig 3 a

Figure 3. Example of seasonal development of corn roots in same location: 7 inches from the soil surface.

Using this type of information about corn root system development, growers can more precisely plan fertilizer and irrigation applications to avoid nutrient leaching in Florida. Also, by assessing differences in cultivars for root system growth, growers can tailor choices to match field conditions. Clearly, the presence of deep roots in this cultivar by 60 DAP indicated it has the potential to access deep nutrients and water that might be beneficial during the grain filling period of silage corn.

 

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Author: Diane – dlrowland@ufl.edu

My professional research is focused on the physiological mechanisms which determine stress response in crops. I am particularly interested in drought tolerance and irrigation scheduling. I study peanut, cotton, corn, and sesame.

Diane

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/01/09/ufifas-researchers-studying-corn-root-development-in-floridas-sandy-soils/

Alabama Corn and Wheat Short Course December 14 & 15

Alabama Corn and Wheat Short Course December 14 & 15

Walker Irrigated Corn

The 2015 Alabama Corn and Wheat Short Course will be held at the Auburn University Hotel and Dixon Conference Center December 14-15.

Presenters from Auburn University,  the Alabama Cooperative Extension System,  other land grant universities, industry and the U.S. Department of Agriculture will address a variety of topics pertaining to corn and wheat growth.

Alabama Extension small grains specialist Brenda Ortiz, said this course is an opportunity for farmers to learn more about every aspect of crop management.  “Farmers are always looking to optimize current practices, or adopt new ones,” Ortiz said. “Higher profitability and environmental protection are two of their top concerns. Our speakers try to provide current information to help farmers improve yield and profitability.”

Ortiz said the conference presenters are a combination of university faculty and private companies to give farmers a brief overview of new sciences and technologies available for farmers in the field.  She said the group of speakers is very diverse, offering attendees information from all areas of production.  “There was a significant increase in the acres of grain sorghum planted this year, and many issues with sorghum pests,” Ortiz said. “To help farmers combat these issues we have expanded the conference topics to include sorghum management information.”  The complete agenda is below.

Topics include managing corn for high yields, soil health and cover crop mixtures, best practices for sorghum production, wheat production and profitability, and wheat management. A complete list of topics and speakers can be found by downloading the full agenda: Corn and Wheat Short Course

Registration for the conference can be found online. Registration closes Dec. 4. Group rates for rooms are available at the Auburn University Hotelcorn and wheat short course agenda

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Author: Libbie Johnson – libbiej@ufl.edu

Agriculture agent at UF IFAS Escambia County Extension.
http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/

Libbie Johnson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/11/21/alabama-corn-and-wheat-short-course-december-14-15/

Corn Harvest is Winding Down in Jackson County

Combines are rolling along at Dietrich Farms in Jackson County this week.  Photo credit:  Doug Mayo

Combines were rolling along at Dietrich Farms in Jackson County this week. Photo credit: Doug Mayo

It is corn harvest time in Jackson County.  While many farmers and ranchers are enjoying the more frequent rainfall lately, it is making corn harvest more challenging.  Agents in Jackson County have performed yield checks on several varieties for local farmers that have ranged from 230-260 bu/acre.

jackson Corn Truck Fill

Most area farmers had decent yields from 200-260 bu/acre, but were somewhat disappointing in comparison to the past few years. Photo credit: Doug Mayo.

For the most part, farmers were a little disappointed in their corn yields this year.  The corn went from a wet start to a dry finish, and now harvest has been somewhat delayed by recent heavy rains in the area.  According to a local custom harvesting service, there was less corn produced in the area than in previous years.  Fewer acres were planted in total, and the fields that were grown had yields that were slightly off from the high yields of the past two years.  If the weather holds, however, corn harvest in Jackson County should wrap up by the end of next week.

Jackson Corn Combine View

Late season weed growth may have reduced corn yields late in the season. From the driver’s seat in the combine you can see the green weeds really starting to take off. Photo credit: Doug Mayo

Weed control also became an issue late in the season.  Speculation is that the hot, dry weather in June and July, and then harvest delays in August allowed weed growth late in the season after preemergence herbicides began to break down.  While fields remained clean for most of the season, the late season weed growth may have also been a factor in reducing corn yields slightly.

 

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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Jackson County Extension Director, Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/08/15/corn-harvest-is-winding-down-in-jackson-county/

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