Tag Archive: December

What is the USDA Survey You Got in the Mail in December?

What is the USDA Survey You Got in the Mail in December?

In addition to Christmas cards, farmers and ranchers in Florida received the National Agricultural Classification Survey (NACS) in December 2016’s mail.  This questionnaire will assist the U.S. Department of Agriculture to identify active farms and ranches in the United States, in preparation for the upcoming Ag Census.

The result of the NACS will determine who receives a census of agriculture questionnaire in December 2017. The census of agriculture is conducted every five years by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), and is the basis for uniform, comprehensive, and impartial agricultural data representing every county in the nation.

Through the census of agriculture, producers are able to establish the value and importance of agriculture, and influence decisions which will shape the future of the industry in this country. The reporting deadline for the NACS is January 30, 2016.

The census of agriculture is the leading source of data about domestic agriculture. Farm organizations, businesses, government decision-makers, commodity market analysts, news media, researchers, county agents and many others utilize census of agriculture information. It ensures every farm and ranch is represented.

The census of agriculture defines a farm as an entity which produces and sells, or could sell, $ 1,000 or more of agriculture products within a given calendar year. The NACS is required by law, as part of the census of agriculture. Under this same statute all information reported by individuals is protected.

For more information about Ag Classification Survey, and the 2017 Census of Agriculture, visit:

 

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Author: Les Harrison – harrisog@ufl.edu

Les Harrison is the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Director, Agriculture and Natural Resources. He works with small and medium sized producers in the Big Bend region of north Florida on a wide range of topics. He has a Master’s of Science Degree in Agricultural Economics from Auburn University and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Journalism from the University of Florida.

Les Harrison

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/14/what-is-the-usda-survey-you-got-in-the-mail-in-december/

December Weather Summary and January Outlook

National Weather Service estimates of rainfall across the Panhandle in December 2016.

December brought quite a change from the previous months of drought.  The National Weather Service estimates for rainfall ranged from isolated locations with over 15″ (purple), large regions with over 10″ (hot pink), to less than 4″ along the coast of Gulf, Franklin, Wakulla and Jefferson Counties (tan and yellow).

The six Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN) stations also documented the range in rainfall in December, from a low of only 3.3″ in Carrabelle to over 12″ in Marianna and DeFuniak.  All six FAWN stations recorded above historic average for the month of December.  For the year, the wettest location was at the station in Defuniak, with 63.1″ in 2016.  The driest location was at Carrabelle with only 48.4″ for the year.  Certainly the rainfall was not uniform in 2016 with Monticello station recording 4.8″ above historic average, while the other five locations were below average for the year.  The Carrabelle location was unusually dry, 7.4″ below historic average for annual rainfall.

Annual averages don’t tell the whole story.  It is not just how much falls in total, but when it comes.  The chart above shows how three months:  March, August, and December made up for the shortfalls the rest of the year at the Marianna location.  For the record it was an average year of 54″ of rain, but July, October and November were serious drought months.

The high rainfall totals in December did ease the drought through the Panhandle, but not uniformly.  Calhoun, Gulf, Liberty, Bay and Leon, as well as portions of Escambia and Jefferson Counties are still listed in the Moderate Drought category.  This may change in the weeks ahead with all of the rain in early January.

Temperatures did continue to cool off from November to December. The average air temperature dropped 4° from 61° to 57° in December, and the average soil temperate dropped 8°, from 69 down to 61.

January Outlook

The Climate Predication Center’s (CPC) outlook for January calls for warmer and wetter than average.  It does seem as if La Niña has lost some of its grip, which should mean continued improvement of drought conditions, at least in the Panhandle.

The CPC is expecting the drought conditions to continue to improve in the Panhandle region, but not necessarily for the rest of Florida.

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/07/december-weather-summary-and-january-outlook/

Cattle Market Price Watch: December 2016

Cattle Market Price Watch: December 2016

The August 2017 Feeder Cattle futures contract decreased by $ 0.22/cwt. during December.  Based on this futures price decrease, August Feeder Cattle revenues decreased by approximately $ 1.65/head ($ 0.22/cwt. * 7.5 cwt.) on a 750-pound feeder steer which amounts to $ 110.00/truckload (50,000 lbs.). The August Feeder Cattle futures contract high, contract low, and price range since September 2016 are $ 128.00, $ 109.90, and $ 18.10/cwt., respectively. The price range of $ 18.10/cwt. on a 750-pound feeder steer totals $ 135.75/head and $ 9,050.00/truckload.

  1. The breakeven price was estimated to be $ 722.10/hd. or $ 131.29/cwt. ($ 722.10/hd. divided by 5.50 cwt.). The breakeven price includes production costs of $ 705/hd. and death loss of $ 17.10/hd.
  2. The price objective was estimated to be $ 872.10/hd. or $ 158.56/cwt. ($ 872.10/hd. divided by 5.50 cwt.). The price objective includes production costs of $ 705/hd., death loss ($ 17.10/hd.), family living withdrawal ($ 100/hd.), and growth capital/retirement ($ 50/hd.).
  3. The expected cash price is equal to the daily August 2017 Feeder Cattle futures closing price plus an expected August 2017 South Florida 550 lb. Feeder Calf Basis of $ 2/cwt.

 

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Author: Chris Prevatt – prevacg@ufl.edu

Chris Prevatt

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/07/cattle-market-price-watch-december-2016/

Cotton Marketing News: December Numbers May Contain Hidden Stocking Stuffers

Cotton Marketing News:  December Numbers May Contain Hidden Stocking Stuffers

shurley-12-9-16-headerDon Shurley, Cotton Economist, UGA Professor Emeritus

My kids, and now grandkids, seem to enjoy the cheap, unexpected surprises in their Christmas stocking as much as anything.  USDA’s December crop production and supply/demand estimates were as expected, in some respects, but contain a few things that maybe can be viewed as unexpected and positive.

Prices (March futures) continue to track in a range of mostly 70 to 72 ½ cents, but I sense cautiousness in the market.  Today’s close at 70.8 cents is the lowest since mid-November.shurley-futures-chart-12-9-16

The US crop is now projected at 16.52 million bales—up 360,000 bales from the November estimate.  This is due largely to a nearly ½ million bale increase in the Texas crop, but offset somewhat by an additional 150,000 bale reduction in the Carolinas and Virginia crops.

Compared to the November estimates, yield and production were increased in 7 states, and reduced in 4 states.  The Georgia crop was unchanged at 915 lbs per acre and total production of 2.25 million bales.  Production loss in the Carolinas and Virginia is estimated at almost ¼ million bales.

The eventual US crop is still uncertain.  The last USDA report showed the Texas crop as 71% harvested as of Nov 27th.  Further news has been that cold weather and continued harvest progress have been concerns since then.

US exports for the 2016 crop year were raised 200,000 bales to 12.2 million bales.  I am wary of this increase, as this will require us to pick up the amount and pace of exports in a market that seems to slow down when cotton is above 70 cents. Also, Australia is expected to increase production and exports.

World production was raised almost 1 million bales compared to the November estimate—due mainly to higher estimates for the US and Australia.  India, Pakistan, and China are unchanged.

World Use/demand is projected at 111.91 million bales—down slightly from the November estimate.  While the reduction is ever so slight, this marks the second consecutive month that Use has been adjusted down (Use was projected at 112 million bales in October).  If realized, this would still be .6% above last season, but not the more robust kind of growth cotton needs to see.shurley-world-use-12-9-16

On a positive note, mill use in China was increased ¼ million bales to 35.75 mb.  If realized, this would be the highest since 2012—still not the China we would like to see, but any increase is good, if it eventually leads to more US exports.  We need to keep an eye on US-China political tensions and any trade implications.

India Use was reduced ¼ million bales, but Vietnam imports and Use were both increased 200,000 bales.

Factors, some of them discussed here, are out there that could push prices back to 72-73 cents, but I don’t know that I would risk more than 20 to 25%, maybe one-third at the most, of my crop on that possibility.  Basis and fiber quality premiums in the Southeast continue strong and offer good cash market opportunity even with futures prices at current levels.

shurely-signature-blockCotton News Sponsor

 

 

 

 

 

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/12/17/cotton-marketing-news-december-numbers-may-contain-hidden-stocking-stuffers/

December Cattle & Forage Management Reminders

December Cattle & Forage Management Reminders

UF/IFAS Beef Cattle & Forage Specialists, and County Extension Agents serving the Florida Panhandle developed a basic management calendar for cattle producers in the region.  The purpose of this calendar is to provide reminders for management techniques with similar timing to those used at the North Florida Research and Education Center’s Beef Unit, near Marianna, Florida.  Links to useful publications with more information are also provided.

Calves born from crossbred cow-calf pairs in Florida (Alachua Co.) can be castrated within 36 day of birth and still wean at satisfactory body weights at weaning. Photo Credit: Matt Hersom

As the year winds down, make sure all herd records are in order and watch calves for scours.  Photo Credit: Matt Hersom

DECEMBER

Cattle Herd Management

  • Check calving cows and heifers 2-3 times daily
    • Move cows and newborn calves out of calving pasture
      • Record calf birth date, weight, tag calves, (optional: castrate bull calves)
    • Evaluate body condition of nursing cattle and increase energy supplement as needed
    • Feed best hay available to nursing cows & heifers
  • Begin supplementing bulls 60 days prior to breeding
  • Watch calves for scours
  • Feed high magnesium mineral if grazing winter annuals and watch for grass tetany
  • Summarize annual cattle herd performance & financial records
  • Prepare record book or calendar to keep herd records for the year ahead

Pasture Management

  • Begin grazing winter annual pastures when forage canopy is 10-12 inches tall and
    • Remove cattle when forage is 4 inches tall
    • If possible, limit-graze for 2-3 hours per day, plus free choice hay to stretch grazing
  • Lime permanent pastures, based on recommendations from soil test report

Pest Management

 

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Pan Ag logo finalUse the following link to download the entire Cattle & Forage Management Annual Calendar:

Panhandle Ag Extension Team Cattle & Forage Management Calendar

 

Developed by the Panhandle Agriculture Extension Livestock and Forage Team:

Doug Mayo, Cliff Lamb, Mark Mauldin, Ann Blount, Cheryl Mackowiak, Jose Dubeux, Jay Ferrell, Jennifer Bearden, Nicolas DiLorenzo, Shep Eubanks, Jed Dillard, Mike Goodchild, Roy Carter, Henry Grant, John Atkins, and Kalyn Waters

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/12/03/december-cattle-forage-management-reminders/

2016 Gadsden Tomato Forum December 1

2016 Gadsden Tomato Forum December 1

tomatos

2016 Gadsden Tomato Forum

December 1, 2016

North Florida Research & Education Center – Quincy, Florida

Hosted by the Gadsden County Extension Service


2016 Gadsden Tomato Forum Agenda

A.M.  (All Times Eastern)

8:00     Registration and coffee

8:15     Opening remarks – Dr. Comerford, NFREC Center Director

8:30     Variety trials and research update – Dr. Josh Freeman

9:15     Disease management options and update – Dr. Mathews Paret

10:00   “Progress and challenges in managing Phytophthora fruit rot of watermelon”

Dr. Shaker Kousik, USDA ARS – Charleston, SC

10:45   Break

11:00   “1-MCP: A new stress management tool for vegetable crops”

Dr. Shinsuke Agehara, Gulf Coast Research and Education Center

11:30   Management of insect pests in tomatoes – Dr. Xavier Martini, UF NFREC

12:00   Update on Food Safety Modernization Act PSA Grower Training – Matt Lollar, UF Jackson County

12:20   Q&A and Sponsors Presentation

12:30   Lunch

1:30     Annual meeting of Gadsden Tomato Growers

For more information contact the Gadsden County Extension office at 850-875-7255.

Tomato

 

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Author: Shep Eubanks – bigbuck@ufl.edu

Shep Eubanks is the County Extension Director and Agriculture Agent in Gadsden County.

Shep Eubanks

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/11/18/2016-gadsden-tomato-forum-december-1/

Alabama Corn and Wheat Short Course – December 12-13

You are invited to participate in the 2016 Alabama Corn and Wheat Short Course. As in previous years, the short course will take place at the Hotel at Auburn University. The event is scheduled for December 12th ( all day) and 13th (morning). We will have a great group of speakers and topics. The short course is free, but we ask that you please register as soon as possible. The hotel will also have rooms available at a special room rate. CCAs/CEUs will be also available. Please feel free to share this information with other farmers or colleagues.

The registration link is provided below:

https://auburn.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_9vng9pQn1D6XCeh

corn_2016-short-course

PG

Author: Libbie Johnson – libbiej@ufl.edu

Agriculture agent at UF IFAS Escambia County Extension.
http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/

Libbie Johnson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/10/29/alabama-corn-and-wheat-short-course-december-12-13/

Panhandle December 2015 Weather Summary

National Weather Service estimates for December 2015 Rainfall in the Panhandle.

National Weather Service estimates for December 2015 Rainfall in the Panhandle.

December was a very wet month for much of the Panhandle, but there was wide variation with eastern counties having much lower totals.  The areas in hot pink show areas that received more than 10″ in December.  Portions of Jefferson and Wakulla had less than 2″ for the month.

1-8-15 National Weather Service River Flood StageWith so much rain at the end of December, major rivers in the Southeast have been near or above flood stage, which is very unusual for this time of year.  The rivers have been falling again, but the sea temperatures that cause El Niño are as warm as they have been since 1997.  With several months of above average rainfall expected, river flooding could become a major issue over the first quarter of 2016.  The chart above shows that currently only the Choctawhatchee River is at major flood stage this week, with minor flooding along the Apalachicola River.

2015 Panhandle Fawn Rainfall Summary

Click on the graphic to enlarge for easier reading.

The six Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN) stations also show the wide variation in rainfall totals for December with a low of 3.1′ in Monticello and a high of 9.7″ at the Jay station.  Only Monticello had below average rainfall for the month.  For the entire year, DeFuniak was by far the wettest location, with more than 78″ in total, while the station at Carrabelle recorded only 48.7″ in 2015.

Marianna 2015 vs Avg Rainfall ChartAnnual rainfall totals can be deceiving, because 2015 was a year with wide variation.  It seemed it was either too wet or too dry, but seldom normal.  That chart above from the Marianna FAWN Station shows that April, November and December were well above average while the other nine months were at or below average.

2015 Marianna FAWN Weather SummaryNot only was December wet, but also very warm.  The average air temperature was only 3 degrees lower than November, and the soil was only 4 degrees cooler than the previous month. Download the full daily temperature and rainfall summary from the Marianna FAWN station for more details on the weather in 2015:

2015 Jackson Co Weather Summary

 

Dec 29 2015 FL Drought MonitorAll the rain the last few months has removed the Panhandle from the US Drought Monitor.  El Niño caused major issues with late fall crop harvest, but it did end the drought in the region.

2016 1st Quarter Weather OutllokLooking ahead to the first three months of 2016, the Climate Predication Center is forecasting below average temperatures and a high probability for above average rainfall across all of Florida. They are expecting that El Niño will continue to impact weather patterns for the next three months.  It does appear that 2016 is going to get off to wet start.  Certainly small grain farmers will need to protect their crops from fungal disease.  How long will this pattern hold?  What impact will it have on corn and vegetable planting, and possibly even cotton and peanut planting later in May? It all depends on when and how much the sea surface temperatures cool down.

The Climate Prediction Center’s El Niño forecast remains the same as it was last month:

Most models indicate that a strong El Niño will continue through the Northern Hemisphere winter 2015-16. The forecaster consensus remains nearly unchanged from last month, with the expectation that this El Niño will rank among the three strongest episodes dating back to 1950. El Niño is expected to remain strong through Northern Hemisphere winter 2015-16, with a transition to ENSO-neutral anticipated during the late spring or early summer.

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/01/09/panhandle-december-2015-weather-summary/

December Florida Cattle Market Price Watch

Prevatt FL Cattle Market headerChris Prevatt, UF/IFAS Livestock Economist

Prevatt Dec 1The August 2016 Feeder Cattle futures contract declined by $ 1.10/cwt. during December. Based on this futures price decrease, August Feeder Cattle revenues decreased by approximately $ 8.25/hd. ($ 1.10/cwt. * 7.5 cwt.) on a 750-pound feeder steer which amounts to $ 550.00 per truckload (50,000 lbs.).

The August Feeder Cattle futures contract low, contract high, and price range since September 2015 are $ 147.20, $ 188.70, and $ 41.50/cwt., respectively. The price range of $ 41.50/cwt. on a 750-pound feeder steer totals $ 311.25/hd. and $ 20,750.00 per truckload.Prevatt Dec 2

  1. The breakeven price was estimated to be $ 768.00/hd. or $ 146.29/cwt. ($ 768.00/hd. divided by 5.25 cwt.). The breakeven price includes production costs of $ 750/hd. and death loss of $ 18.00/hd.
  2. The price objective was estimated to be $ 918.00/hd. or $ 174.86/cwt. ($ 918.00/hd. divided by 5.25 cwt.). The price objective includes production costs of $ 750/hd., death loss ($ 18.00/hd.), family living withdrawal ($ 100/hd.), and growth capital/retirement ($ 50/hd.).
  3. The expected cash price is equal to the daily August 2016 Feeder Cattle futures closing price plus an expected August 2016 South Florida 525 lb. Feeder Calf Basis of -$ 2/cwt.

 

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/01/09/december-florida-cattle-market-price-watch/

Gardener’s To Do List for December

Gardener’s To Do List for December

growing-daffodilstree pruningThough the calendar says December, the weather in Northwest Florida fluctuates between winter and spring temperatures. The nice days are wonderful opportunities to accomplish many of those outside landscape chores in preparation for spring.  But, it is also a good time to start planning for next month’s colder temperatures.  Since we don’t experience frozen soil, winter is the best time to transplant hardy trees and shrubs.  Deciduous trees establish root systems more quickly while dormant; versus installing them in the spring with all their tender new leaves.  Here are a few suggestions for tasks that can be performed this month:

  • Plant shade trees, fruit trees, and evergreen shrubs.
  • Plant pre-chilled daffodil and narcissus bulbs (late December/early January).
  • Do major re-shaping of shade trees, if needed, during the winter dormancy.
  • Water live Christmas trees as needed and water holiday plants such as poinsettias as needed.
  • Check houseplants for insect pests such as scale, mealy bugs, fungus gnats, whitefly and spider mites.
  • Continue to mulch leaves from the lawn. Shred excess leaves and add to planting beds or compost pile.
  • Replenish finished compost and mulch in planting beds, preferably before the first freeze.
  • Switch sprinkler systems to ‘Manual’ mode for the balance of winter.
  • Water thoroughly before a hard freeze to reduce plants’ chances of damage.
  • Water lawn and all other plants once every three weeks or so, if supplemental rainfall is less than one inch in a three week period.
  • Fertilize pansies and other winter annuals as needed.
  • Protect tender plants from hard freezes.
  • Be sure to clean, sharpen and repair all your garden and lawn tools. Now is also the best time to clean and have your power mower, edger and trimmer serviced.
  • Be sure the mower blade is sharpened and balanced as well.
  • Provide food and water to the area’s wintering birds.Spreading-Mulch
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Author: Sheila Dunning – sdunning@ufl.edu


http://okaloosa.ifas.ufl.edu

Sheila Dunning

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/12/16/gardeners-to-do-list-for-december/

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