Tag Archive: Farmers

Farmers Invited to View On-farm Cotton Test – October 10

Farmers Invited to View On-farm Cotton Test – October 10

 

Farmers are invited to view the 15 cotton variety test at Bishop Farms. Photo – Doug Mayo

Variety selection can play a large role in the management strategy of a crop, as well its yield potential. This year in Jackson County, UF/IFAS Extension collaborated with Bishop Farms for an on-farm trial.

Fifteen cotton varieties were planted side by side to monitor season long performance and yield comparisons at harvest. The trial was defoliated on October 1st, and the morning of Tuesday October 10th growers are encouraged to visit the trial and see the varieties in person. Extension Agronomists David Wright, Ian Small, and Regional Crop IPM Agent Ethan Carter will be in the field from 10-11:30am (CST) and available to discuss the varieties and crop performance with those who stop by with questions as they view the different varieties. Plot maps will be provided and each variety will be marked with signs.

The field is located at the intersection of Sweet Pond and Paramore Road, the address is 6701 Paramore Rd, Sneads, FL 32460. Please contact Ethan at the Jackson County Extension Office (850-482-9620) for any questions, or 352-221-0580 the morning of the tour, if you have trouble finding the location of the tour.

 

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Author: Ethan Carter – ethancarter@ufl.edu

Ethan Carter is the Regional Row Crop IPM Agent in Jackson County. He earned his BS in Food and Resource Economics, and his MS in Agronomy, both from the University of Florida.

Ethan Carter

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/10/06/farmers-invited-to-view-on-farm-cotton-test-october-10/

Moisture Monitoring, Cover Crops, and Best Management Practices for Crop Farmers

Moisture Monitoring, Cover Crops, and Best Management Practices for Crop Farmers

On August 10th, UF/IFAS Santa Rosa and Escambia County Extension hosted a field day covering moisture monitoring, cover crops, and best management practices at Mickey Diamond’s Farm.  Through a Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) Best Management Practice (BMP) mini-grant, UF/IFAS Extension, FDACS, and NRCS have been able to examine how cover crops are working to improve soil moisture holding capacity by doing some work one of Mickey’s fields.

This past winter, Mickey established a rye cover crop in the field, but agreed to do a very early burndown on a portion of his field and left the majority of the field with rye actively growing.  He terminated the crop by using a glyphosate application and then using a crimper roller to form a mat of rye on the soil surface.

Crimper rollers are good options to help with the termination process of a winter small grain cover crop.

The field was stripp-tilled in late Spring, and planted in cotton.  After the cotton germinated and put on true leaves, BMP Logic ( a private company) came and installed soil moisture sensors on each plot (cover crop and non-cover crop).  These probes have telemetry capabilities, so the data were sent directly to managers of the BMP Logic site where they were analyzed on a regular basis.

The rains held off for a few weeks early on in the season, so there was some difference noticed in the amount of moisture held in the upper horizons of the soil profile, where there was a cover crop, versus no cover.  See the charts below.

Other than soil moisture retention, why would a grower want to spend the extra time and cost to establish a cover crop?  When that question was asked to the group attending the field day, some interesting answers came up.  Many want to hold the moisture and increase infiltration through the root zone, but others want to supply some nitrogen by using legumes.  Others were looking to scavenge nutrients from the previous crop.  Others were using winter cover crops to graze livestock and needed the winter forage. A number identified reduction of run off and improving water quality as benefits.  A reduction of weed populations and/or better management of weeds throughout the growing season, and reducing the cost of herbicides were other reasons to plant cover crops.  Still, farmers said that managing any crop takes time and effort. Challenges for crop establishment included getting the actual seed desired, planting in a timely fashion, and difficulty in terminating the crop and planting into high residue. Tim Tucker, a Monroe county (Ala) grower stated,  “It doesn’t matter if you get the cover crop in by October 15; get it in when you can.  The benefits are worth it.”

The table below gives some good information on various cover crops that can be grown in the southeast and what benefits each could provide.

 

John Baggett, FDACS BMP coordinator for Escambia, Santa Rosa, and Okaloosa Counties provided information about some of the more popular cover crops for this area.  Quick growing cereal rye offers the greatest production of residue and helps to suppress weeds, reduces soil erosion, increases water retention, and aids in organic matter accumulation.  The extensive root system works to scavenge the nutrients remaining from the previous crop.  The average price per bag will be around $ 13.50; the recommended seeding rate is 60-120 lbs/acre.  If you plant 90 lbs/acre, the cost will be about $ 24/acre. Stephen Godwin, Santa Rosa County farmer, cautions about using high rates of rye when mixing with another small grain or legume.  Because of the strong growth potential of this crop, he plants 20 lbs or less if he’s going to mix it with another crop.

Another very popular option is winter wheat, an easy to grow and cost effective cover crop.  It works well when planted in a blend with crimson clover.  John found the average price to be $ 11.75 per bag, and at a seeding rate of 90 lb/acre, the average cost would be $ 21 per acre.

If you are looking to add a legume, crimson clover is always a popular choice.  This crop can produce a high level of residue as well as fixing nitrogen.  This crop is especially good for attracting beneficial insects, and bee keepers in particular would be happy to have a field of crimson clover nearby.  Seeding rate for this crop is 15-18 lbs/acre if drilled. Clover seed is more expensive at around $ 56 per bag, but you use less seed in a blend.

Always pick a recommended variety; varieties that do well in north Florida can be found in this publication:  Cool-Season Forage Variety Recommendations for Florida.  There are many exceptional sources for learning more about cover crops and using them on farm.  Please review USDA’s publication, Managing Cover Crops Profitably for a much more detailed look at those three, plus many other cover crops. Finally, for specifics on UF/IFAS recommendations, Cover Crops is a publication with good information.  If you have any questions about signing up for the BMP program, your local county extension agent can help you locate your coordinator, or you can scroll to the bottom of this FDACS BMP site to locate your coordinator.

 

 

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Author: Libbie Johnson – libbiej@ufl.edu

Agriculture agent at UF IFAS Escambia County Extension.
http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/

Libbie Johnson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/11/moisture-monitoring-cover-crops-and-best-management-practices-for-crop-farmers/

The Mobile Irrigation Lab Team: Helping Panhandle Farmers Lower Costs and Conserve Water

The Mobile Irrigation Lab Team: Helping Panhandle Farmers Lower Costs and Conserve Water

The Northwest Florida Mobile Irrigation Lab Team, from left to right: Mark Miles, Rex Patterson, and Robert Patterson

The Northwest Florida Mobile Irrigation Lab

Northwest Florida’s Mobile Irrigation Lab (MIL), run by Mark Miles, Rex Patterson, and Robert Patterson, is working hard to help farmers increase crop yields and lower costs through improved irrigation efficiency. By increasing efficiency, farmers can reduce operating costs and increase yields. The MIL has been providing free irrigation evaluations in row crop systems since 2005, and has completed more than 1,000 evaluations across the panhandle, from Escambia to Jefferson County.

Not only are these irrigation assessments good for a farmer’s bottom line, but they are a highly effective way to help conserve Florida’s water resources. The Northwest Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD) estimates that the MIL evaluations have resulted in more than 9.25 million gallons of water saved per day across the district, totaling more than 2.5 billion gallons saved to date. The MIL is funded by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS), the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and the NWFWMD.

The team places a water collection bucket every 20 meters in a straight line along the path of the center pivot to capture irrigated water. Once the buckets are in place, the pivot is turned on and starts moving across the field.

Why are these evaluations important and how are they done?

The MIL wants to make sure that a farmer’s irrigation system is running at maximum efficiency, and a major part of this is making sure that the center pivot distributes water evenly across the field. If not, some plants receive less water than others, and farmers have to increase the amount of water applied to make sure all plants get enough. In areas that are over-watered, fertilizers can move past the crop’s root zone into the aquifer system. These nutrients are no longer available for plants to use, and they contaminate our water resources. By fixing distribution problems, farmers reduce the amount of water used and operating costs are lowered – less fertilizer is wasted and pumping costs (electricity or fuel costs) are reduced.

When the pivot has moved past the buckets, Rex Patterson measures the content of each one while Robert Patterson records the data. This will let the team know how evenly the pivot system is distributing water in the field.

During an MIL evaluation, the team will go through the entire irrigation system to evaluate how effectively it is running. This includes testing the center pivot’s distribution uniformity (how evenly water is applied to plants in the field), the application rate, pivot speed, water pressure, water flow rate and checking for leaks. The MIL analyzes this information and prepares a confidential report for the farmer. Recommendations to improve efficiency can include replacing sprinklers, fixing leaks and end gun adjustments, among others. Farmers can have an evaluation done every three years.

Mark Miles (left) places the flow meter on the center pivot’s pipe stand and Rex Patterson (right) waits for the system to pressurize before checking the water’s flow rate on the meter’s console.

How do you schedule an irrigation evaluation for your farm?

To schedule an appointment with the Northwest Florida Mobile Irrigation Lab, call: (850) 482-0388; Fax: (850) 463-8618. Their offices are located on 4155 Hollis Drive, Marianna, FL 32448.

If your farm is outside the Panhandle, us the following FDACS website to contact the MIL that serves your area:   MILs in Florida.  There are currently 14 MILs providing services in 62 counties across the state.

Cost-share funds for irrigation management

FDACS, the USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and the water management districts offer cost-share funds for irrigation management, which includes irrigation system enhancements and conversions, end gun control and pump bowl upgrades among others. Contact your local FDACS field staff, NRCS office and water management district for more information on available cost-shares and funding deadlines. This information can be found on the following websites:

 

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Author: Andrea Albertin – albertin@ufl.edu

Dr. Andrea Albertin is the Northwest Regional Specialized Agent in Water Resources.

Andrea Albertin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/11/the-mobile-irrigation-lab-team-helping-panhandle-farmers-lower-costs-and-conserve-water/

Farmers Prepare for the New Food Safety Standards

If you are a farmer, you have most likely heard about the Food Safety Modernization Act, or FSMA, by now. If you are not a farmer, you probably do not know that food safety regulations are going through a big change. The FSMA, which was passed in 2011, is considered the largest update to food safety regulation in over 80 years.

The proposed produce safety rule under the FSMA is very robust, establishing the minimum standards for worker training, health and hygiene, agricultural water use, animal soil amendments, on-farm domesticated and wild animals, equipment, tools, buildings, and sprout production.

But this new rule will not apply to all farmers. The commodities they produce and the value of their produce sold will ultimately dictate whether they will need to comply.

First, the rule does not apply to produce that is not a raw agricultural commodity, or commodities the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has identified as “rarely consumed raw.” Secondly, if a farm has an average value of produce sold of $ 25,000 or less within the previous three years, they are also exempt.

If the farmer produces an agricultural commodity in which the rule applies and the value of their produce sold is over $ 25,000, it is still possible the farm will be exempt from most of the requirements.

Fresh cucumbers, for example, are considered a raw commodity. But cucumbers that will undergo further processing, such as for pickling, would be eligible for exemption from the produce rule. Photo by Molly Jameson.

For instance, if the average annual monetary value of food sold directly to qualified end-users was more than the average annual value of the food sold to all other buyers within the previous three-year period, the farmer would meet the first half of exemption eligibility.

What is a “qualified end-user”, you ask? They are considered the consumers of the food, or restaurant or retail food establishment, located with the same state as the farm that produced the food (or no more than 275 miles).

But even if farmers meet the above exemption eligibility standards, they must also meet the second requirement. That is, the average annual monetary value of all food sold during the three-year period must be less than $ 500,000, when adjusted for inflation.

If this all sounds confusing, you are not alone! This is why the FDA developed a chart to help farmers determine if they will be exempt: Standards for Produce Safety – Coverage and Exemptions/Exclusions for Proposed 21 PART 112.

Whether farms will be exempt from the FSMA produce safety rule or not, it is always a good idea to follow good agricultural practices and to have a farm food safety plan. To learn more about food safety on farms, view the EDIS document Food Safety on the Farm: An Overview of Good Agricultural Practices.

If you are a farmer, or know someone who would benefit from having a food safety plan, the UF Small Farms Academy Extension Agents are offering a Building Your Own Farm’s Food Safety Manual Workshop in Tallahassee to help growers develop their own food safety manuals.

The workshop is tailored to fresh fruit and vegetable farms, fields, or greenhouses and is partially supported by a grant through the Florida Specialty Crops Block Grant program from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Service.

The registration fee is $ 35 for the first person representing a farm and $ 15 for an additional attendee from that farm. The workshop is limited to 20 farms on a first come, first serve basis.

The workshop will take place at the Amtrak Station, County Community Room, 918 Railroad Ave, in Tallahassee, FL, on Tuesday, May 23, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Register on Eventbrite by following this link: https://farmfoodsafetymanualworkshop.eventbrite.com

Please note, this class will help farmers develop their farm’s food safety manual, but it does not fulfill the new FDA FSMA one-time training requirement.

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Author: Molly Jameson – mjameson@ufl.edu

Molly Jameson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/05/12/farmers-prepare-for-the-new-food-safety-standards/

Beavers – Engineering Marvel or Farmer’s Frustration

Beavers – Engineering Marvel or Farmer’s Frustration

Beaver lodge, Calhoun County Florida. Photo by Judy Biss

Even though the “work” beavers do can sometimes cause frustration to land owners, they are truly amazing creatures.  A number of questions have come into the Extension Office lately about managing beavers, so it is a good time to discuss a little about the history and biology of these unique animals, as well as the management options available for land owners.

Beavers in the American Landscape

Hundreds of millions of beaver once occupied the North American continent until the 1900s, when the majority had been trapped out in the eastern United States for the fur trade (Baker, B.W., and E.P. Hill. 2003. Beaver (Castor canadensis)).  “Growing public concern over declines in beaver and other wildlife populations eventually led to regulations that controlled harvest through seasons and methods of take, initiating a continent-wide recovery of beaver populations.” (Baker, B.W., and E.P. Hill. 2003. Beaver (Castor canadensis)).  In its current range, the beaver “thrives throughout the Florida Panhandle and upper peninsula in streams, rivers, swamps or lakes that have an ample supply of trees.”  (Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Aquatic Mammals, Beaver: Castor canadensis).

Adaptations

Beavers are the largest rodent in North America.  In Florida, they commonly weigh between 30 – 50 pounds.  Beavers are considered an aquatic mammal, having adaptations such as a streamlined shape, insulating fur, ears and nostrils that close while underwater, clear membranes that cover their eyes while underwater, large webbed feet, and a broad flat rudder-like tail that aid in swimming.  They can remain underwater for 15 minutes at a time!  Their tree-cutting, bark-peeling front teeth grow continuously, and as a result, are continuously sharpened as they grind against the lower teeth.  (Baker, B.W., and E.P. Hill. 2003. Beaver (Castor canadensis), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Aquatic Mammals, Beaver: Castor canadensis).

Habitat and Behaviors

Beavers typically mate for life and live in family groups consisting of the adult male and female, and one or two generations of young kits before they are old enough to disperse on their own.  They are primarily nocturnal, being active from dusk to dawn.  Beavers eat not only tree bark, leaves, stems, buds, and fruits, but  herbaceous plants as well.  Their diet is broad and can consist of aquatic plants, such as cattails and water lilies, shrubs, willow, grasses, acorns, tree sap, and sometimes even cultivated row crops.  (Baker, B.W., and E.P. Hill. 2003. Beaver (Castor canadensis)).

Top of beaver dam in Calhoun County FL. Water level difference is nearly 3 feet. Photo by Judy Biss

Dam and Lodge Construction

The sound of moving water triggers beavers to build, repair, or maintain their dams.  (Baker, B.W., and E.P. Hill. 2003. Beaver (Castor canadensis)).  The two main structures they build are the water-slowing dam and their living quarters or lodge.  The lodge is separate from the dam and is oftentimes located in the stream or pond bank.  “The ponds created by dams also provide beavers with deep water where they can find protection from predators — entrances to dens or lodges are usually underwater.  Some beavers in Florida do not build the massive stick lodges associated with northern colonies.  Instead, they are more likely to live in deep dens in stream banks…” Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Aquatic Mammals, Beaver: Castor canadensis).

Pear tree felled by beaver in Calhoun County FL. Photo by Judy Biss

Impacts

Beavers are called “nature’s engineers” for good reason.  Their tree cutting and building behaviors certainly alter surrounding landscapes.  Outside of any connection to human civilization, their activities tend to increase diversity and habitat options for both plants and animals.  Many scientists have examined the intricate biological and ecological effects beavers have on surrounding landscapes.  Their activities in our backyard, however, do not always result in positive outcomes.  Often, beavers are triggered to build dams in running water through road culverts causing significant impacts to road drainage, and surrounding flood management.  Their construction of dams along creeks can flood farm fields and woodlands.  Their feeding and tree cutting can kill desired trees in nearby timberland and orchards.

Management Options for Land Owners

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) publication, “Living with Beavers” provides excellent advice, along with a summary of the regulations regarding this native wildlife species.  As per this document, “The beaver is a native species with a year-round hunting and trapping season in Florida.”  Beaver hunting and trapping regulations can be found on the FWC Furbearer Hunting and Trapping website.  A beaver can be taken as a nuisance animal, if it causes or is about to cause property damage, presents a threat to public safety, or causes an annoyance in, under, or upon a building, per Florida Rule 68A-9.010.”  Other recommendations from this FWC publication are:

  • “Beaver dam removal provides immediate relief from flooding and can be the simplest and cheapest way of dealing with a beaver problem. However, beavers often quickly rebuild a dam as soon as it is damaged. “
  • “When removing a dam is infeasible or unsuccessful, installing a water level control structure through the dam can allow for the control of water flow without removing the dam. This technique also reduces the likelihood of the beaver continuously blocking water flow. For technical assistance, contact a wildlife assistance biologist at a regional FWC office near you.”
  • “If a beaver dam is blocking a culvert or similar structure, installing a barrier several feet away from the culvert can be the most effective solution. This prevents the beavers from accessing the culvert to dam it. Please contact a wildlife assistance biologist at a regional FWC office near you for technical assistance.”
  • “Protect valuable trees and vegetation from beaver damage by installing a fence around them or wrapping tree trunks loosely with 3-5 feet of hardware cloth or multiple wraps of chicken wire. This prevents the beavers from chewing on the trees and other plants.”
  • “Lethal control should be considered a last resort.”

FWC also points the reader to this publication from Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service, Department of Aquaculture, Fisheries and Wildlife, “The Clemson Beaver Pond Leveler.”  This publication provides diagrams and a list of materials needed to construct a device which is designed to “minimize the probability that current flow can be detected by beavers, therefore minimizing dam construction.”

All questions regarding beaver management should be directed to your local FWC Regional Office.  Land owners can also request a list of Nuisance Wildlife Trappers available in their area:

FWC Northwest Region Office
3911 Highway 2321
Panama City, FL 32409-1659
(850) 265-3676

 Links to the references used for this article:

 

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Author: Judy Biss – judy.biss@ufl.edu

Judy Biss is the Agriculture and Natural Resource Agent in Calhoun County, Florida

Judy Biss

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/03/18/beavers-engineering-marvel-or-farmers-frustration/

Local Farmers Inspire the Next Generation about Agriculture

Fred and Bobby teaching a group of 4-Hers about goats.

Fred and Bobbie Golden relocated to Jefferson County from Lakeland, Florida in 2000 to establish Golden Acres Ranch LLC.  The sixty-three-acre ranch is home to one of the largest mayhaw ponds in the region, grass fed goat & sheep, free-range chickens, guineas, pet boarding, and a country store.

Bobbie and Fred have genuine love for Jefferson County 4-Hers. Can you tell the difference between a sheep and a goat?  Jefferson County 4-H campers can!  For the past six years, 5-8 year old youth visited their ranch during 4-H day camps for some hands-on learning about agriculture. The campers have opportunities to feed, pet and learn important facts about Tennessee Fainting Goats, sheep, Pyrenees and Maremma, chicken, guineas and other animals reared on the farm.

 

Abagail Loveless, day camp participant said, “the reasons I like to visit Golden Acers Ranch, you get to feed, pet, learn things about the farm animals and swing on the tire/rope. “London Skipworth indicated that she was afraid of chickens, but with help and support from teen counselors and 4-H Staff, she was able to overcome her fears. London now plans to participate in the 4-H Chick Chain Project this year.

After a day of farming, Abigail enjoys a tire swing

Bobbie Golden, said “I like inviting the campers to the ranch because I like teaching them interesting facts about our farm animals, but most importantly bringing the youth back in touch with agriculture.”

Bobbie is a member of the Jefferson County Extension Ag Advisory and Vice President of the Overall Extension Advisory Committee.  Bobbie also chaired the Extension Office open house committee.  Bobbie and Fred support Jefferson County Extension in every capacity.

Annually, Jefferson County Extension participates in the Millstone Farm Tour and the Mayhaw Festival; both held events at Golden Acers Ranch. Each Extension program area provides interactive displays and hands activities for the youth and adults. For more information about Golden Acres Ranch, please go to https://goldenacresranchflorida.com/.

Campers leading songs on a hay ride around the farm.

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Author: jgl1 – jgl@ufl.edu

jgl1

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/03/03/local-farmers-inspire-the-next-generation-about-agriculture/

Income Tax Workshop for Farmers, Accountants, and Attorneys – October 3

Income Tax Workshop for Farmers, Accountants, and Attorneys – October 3

tax for farmers

 

On October 3rd at the ALFA building in Robertsdale, AL the Alabama Cooperative Extension System is offering a workshop on income tax for agricultural operations from 6:00-8:30.  The ALFA building is located at 21332 Highway 59, Robertsdale, AL 36567.

Topics will include the following:

  • Schedule F—Profit or Loss from Farming
  • How to report farming income and government payments:
    • Livestock
    • Rent
    • Crop shares
    • Commodity Credit Corporation loans
    • Conservation Reserve Program
    • Crop insurance and crop disaster payments
    • Income from cooperatives
    • Cancellation of debt
  • How to report expenses and prepaid expenses
  • What to File and When
  • Schedule J—Income Averaging for Farmers and Fishermen
  • The Effect of Claiming Accelerated Depreciation under Section 179 and Section 178(k) on a Farmer’s Cash Flow
  • The Cost of Retiring or the Tax Implications of Disposition of Machinery and Land
  • How Income Affects Social Security Benefits

The registration fee is $ 15 for farmers and $ 65 for accountants and attorneys who will receive 2.5 hours of CPE and 2.3 hours of CLE.  To register, visit www.aces.edu/farmtax or call 334-844-5100.

 

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Author: Libbie Johnson – libbiej@ufl.edu

Agriculture agent at UF IFAS Escambia County Extension.
http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/

Libbie Johnson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/09/24/income-tax-workshop-for-farmers-accountants-and-attorneys-october-3/

The Vegetable Production Handbook of Florida: The Go-to-Guide for Vegetable Farmers

The Vegetable Production Handbook of Florida:  The Go-to-Guide for Vegetable Farmers

Figure 1 freeman 3The recently updated Vegetable Production Handbook of Florida (VPH) is the go-to-source of information on vegetable production.  So you need to know how to control leafminers in sweet potato? It is in there! Maybe you have a problem with Cercospora leaf spot in okra? Need some weed management options in tomato? That is in there too! You will also find information on weed management in watermelon, disease control in squash, and on and on.  You will be hard pressed to find a better desk-top or truck-seat reference guide for vegetable production.

The Vegetable Production Handbook has production recommendations for most of the vegetable crops produced  commercially in Florida. For each crop group there are recommendations for varieties, planting date, plant spacing, soil fertility, weed, insect, and disease management. Always remember to consult pesticide labels before making any application. Links below are to the entire VPH document, as well as the UF/IFAS Extension website that has each individual chapter listed

Freeman Crop IndexInformation in the VPH is derived from the research and years of experience of a team of UF/IFAS specialists.The VPH Team is made up of specialists in horticulture, entomology, plant pathology, nematology, weed science, and soil science.   The 2016-2017 edition is now available online, or as hard copies available to commercial growers at your local County Extension office. The authors and editors hope you will utilize this valuable resource to contribute to the success in the current and coming growing seasons.

Links to the Vegetable Handbook online:

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic_vph (by crop)

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/cv/cv29200.pdf (complete 371 page handbook)

 

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Author: Josh Freeman – joshuafr@ufl.edu

Dr. Freeman’s program focuses on vegetable and melon cropping systems important to the state and region. Much of his research and extension efforts are focused in the area of soil fumigants and fumigant alternatives for soil-borne pest and weed management. Many of the vegetable crops in Florida are produced using the plasticulture production system. For decades growers have relied on the soil fumigant methyl bromide for pest management. This chemistry is no longer available and Dr. Freeman’s program is addressing this issue.
https://www.facebook.com/NFRECVegetable

Josh Freeman

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/08/27/the-vegetable-production-handbook-of-florida-the-go-to-guide-for-vegetable-farmers/

Farmers Market Symposium in Pensacola March 8

farmers market symposium 2

On Tuesday, March 8, 2016,  UF/IFAS Extension Escambia County will hold a Farmers Market Symposium from 8:30-3:30.  The meeting will take place at the Langley Bell 4-H Auditorium, 3730 Stefani Road Cantonment FL 32533.

EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS WILL INCLUDE:

  • Overview of Florida Farmers Markets

  • Starting a Community Garden

  • Best Practices at Farmers Markets

  • Food Safety Guidelines for Growers and Vendors

  • Multiple Payment Options for Farmers Markets

  • Cottage Food Laws

  • Marketing Opportunities

  • Food Safety at the Farmers Market

  • Additional Optional Session: Farmers Market Nutrition Program Training for any interested vendors

 

Lunch and refreshments will be provided.  The cost is $ 15 for pre-registration, $ 20 at the door.  REGISTER ONLINE at http://tinyurl.com/IFAS-Farmers-Market-Symposium

For more information, contact Christina Walmer or by phone at 850.475.5230

 

 

 

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Author: Libbie Johnson – libbiej@ufl.edu

Agriculture agent at UF IFAS Escambia County Extension.
http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/

Libbie Johnson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/02/13/farmers-market-symposium-in-pensacola-march-8/

Farmers Market Symposium on March 8, 2016

Farmers Market Symposium on March 8, 2016

farmers market symposium 2On Tuesday, March 8, 2016,  UF/IFAS Extension Escambia County will hold a Farmers Market Symposium from 8:30-3:30.  The meeting will take place at the Langley Bell 4-H Auditorium, 3730 Stefani Road Cantonment FL 32533.

EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS INCLUDE:
• Overview of Florida Farmers Markets
• Starting a Community Garden
• Best Practices at Farmers Markets
• Food Safety Guidelines for Growers and Vendors
• Multiple Payment Options for Farmers Markets
• Cottage Food Laws
• Marketing Opportunities
• Food Safety at the Farmers Market
• Additional Optional Session: Farmers Market Nutrition Program Training for any interested vendors

Lunch and refreshments will be provided.  The cost is $ 15 for pre-registration, $ 20 at the door.  REGISTER ONLINE at http://tinyurl.com/IFAS-Farmers-Market-Symposium

For more information, contact Christina Walmer at cbwalmer@ufl.edu or by phone at 850.475.5230

 

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Author: Beth Bolles – bbolles@ufl.edu

Horticulture Agent, Escambia County

Beth Bolles

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/02/11/farmers-market-symposium-on-march-8-2016/

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