Tag Archive: Forest

Forest Stewardship Tour of Sandhill Farm in Jackson County – October 5

Forest Stewardship Tour of Sandhill Farm in Jackson County – October 5

Sandhill Farm in Jackson County. Credit: Billy Boothe

Sandhill Farm – Property of David and Cindi Stewart

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Meet at the property at 9:00 AM CT – Adjourn after lunch

When Cindi and David Stewart first saw the mosaic of sandhills, swamps, flatwoods and loblolly pine forest making up this 222-acre Jackson County property, they knew they would buy it. Avid hikers from the south-central Florida suburbs, they loved being in the forest. That was 14 years ago, and they have come a long way towards their goal of managing their property for wildlife habitat. After beginning their land management education with the Master Tree Farmer and Master Wildlifer short courses offered by Clemson University and University of Florida IFAS Extension, they sought advice and a Forest Stewardship management plan from the Florida Forest Service and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.
Following some hard work managing underbrush, they planted 50 acres of longleaf pine.  With diverse wildlife habitat as a primary goal, they burn every two years and have some beautiful groundcover plants like wiregrass and blazing star.  In 2006, they were awarded Jackson County Tree Farmers of the Year. Join us for a walking tour of this property.  This will be a relatively short hike on trails.  Please wear appropriate clothing and footwear for the field.
Cost is $ 10 per person, lunch and materials included. Register online at https://fsp-tour100517.eventbrite.com/. You can also reserve a space by contacting UF/IFAS Jackson County Extension at (850) 482-9620, and pay at the event with cash or check payable to University of Florida.  Space is limited so register early. Please share this announcement with others who may be interested.

Use the following link for the printer friendly event flyer with directions and a map for driving to the property:

Sandhill Farm Stewardship Tour

Driving Directions

David and Cindi Stewart’s Sandhills Farm – 357 Pittman Hill Road – Marianna, FL 32448 – (850) 579-8848
From I-10, Marianna:
  • Exit at the western-most Marianna exit (Exit #136), SR 276.
  • Turn left on SR 276 West and go less than 1 mile to CR 167 South (signs to Panama City &Fountain)
  • Turnleft on CR 167 South
  • Travel about 9.8 miles south on CR 167 to Nortek Blvd. (yellow intersection sign indicating Nortek Blvd & second sign for Compass Lakes inthe Hills) – turn left (east) on Nortek Blvd. -Travel east on Nortek Blvd. until the pavement ends –our property begins on your left as the pavement ends.
  • Stay on Nortek Blvd./Hasty Pond Road (the name changes as the pavement ends) for another ½ mile.
  • Turn left (north) at the first intersection onto Pittman Hill Road
  • They have the first real driveway (with a mailbox) on the left, after you pass the pond on the left –less than ½ mile. The house number “357” is on the mailbox. Follow the power poles to the house.

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/22/forest-stewardship-tour-of-sandhill-farm-in-jackson-county-october-5/

Ethnobotany: Where History and Medicine Meet the Forest

Ethnobotany: Where History and Medicine Meet the Forest

The passionflower vine is beautiful and attracts butterflies, but can also be used for food and sedation drugs. Photo credit: Dorothy Birch

Ethnobotany lies at the intersection of culture, medicine, and mythology. The “witch doctors” and voodoo practitioners, the followers of the Afro-Cuban religion of Santeria, and the wise elders of ancient Chinese civilizations are all ethnobotanists. So, too, are the modern day field biologists who discover and develop medicinal plants into an estimated half of our pharmaceutical drugs. Simply put, ethnobotany is the study of how people and cultures (ethno) interact with plants (botany).

For tens of thousands of years, humans have been learning about plants’ chemical, nutritious, and even poisonous properties. Plants evolve these properties to defend themselves against pathogens, fungi, animals and other plants. Other properties, like color, scent, or sugar content may attract beneficial species. Humans most likely started paying attention to plant characteristics to decide whether to eat them. From there, one can imagine people started using plants to build structures or use fiber for ropes, baskets, and clothing.

My first experience with the idea of ethnobotany was as a college student on a study tour of Belize. A professional ethnobotanist took us on a tour of the Maya Rainforest Medicine Trail, pointing out dozens of native trees, shrubs, and grasses used for medicinal and cultural purposes by local tribes. From birth control and pain relief to chewing gum and pesticides, the forest provided nearly everything Central American civilizations needed to survive for thousands of years and into the present. The tour captured my imagination as I considered the possibilities yet undiscovered in the deep rainforests worldwide.

Of course, there is no need to travel out of the country, or even the state, to learn about useful native plants. One of my favorite publications put out by UF IFAS Extension specialists is “50 Common Native Plants Important in Florida’s Ethnobotanical History.” Another fascinating source of information about historic, cultural, and even murderous uses of plants is Amy Stewart’s Wicked Plants: The Weed That Killed Lincoln’s Mother and Other Botanical Atrocities. Plants with interesting historical uses make for great stories along a trail, and help create a connection between the casual observer and the natural world around them.

A handful of interesting native plants with significant medicinal properties include the cancer-fighting plants saw palmetto (Serenoa repens) and mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum). Saw palmetto berries are used for prostate cancer treatment, while the $ 350+ million annual Florida mayapple harvest helps produce chemotherapy drugs for several types of cancer. The carnivorous bog plant, pink sundew (Drosera capaillaris) uses enzymes to break down insect protein, and Native American tribes used the plant for bacterial and fungal skin disorders.

Sundews, tiny carnivorous plants found in pitcher plant bogs, use an enzyme to dissolve insect proteins. Native Americans recognized this property and used the plant for skin maladies. Photo credit: Carrie Stevenson, UF IFAS Extension

Many plants had (and still have) multiple uses. Yaupon holly (Ilex vomitoria) leaves brewed as a highly caffeinated tea were used ceremonially and before warfare by many southeastern American Indian tribes, and then later by early American settlers when tea was difficult to import. Holly branches were used for arrows, and the bark for warding off nightmares. The purple passionflower, or maypop (Passiflora incarnata) vine attracts butterflies and produces a pulp used for syrups, jams, and drinks. Passionflower extract has also been developed into dozens of drugs and supplements for sedation.

Early civilizations living closer to the land knew many secrets that modern medicine has yet to unlock. Thanks to the ethnobotanists, the field and forest will continue to heal and provide for us for many generations yet to come.

CAUTION: Many of the plants listed or referenced can have hazardous or poisonous properties without appropriate preparation or dosage. Allergic reactions and prescribed drug interactions may occur, and many unproven rumors exist about medicinal uses of plants. Always consult a physician or health professional before trying supplements.

PG

Author: Carrie Stevenson – ctsteven@ufl.edu

Coastal Sustainability Agent, Escambia County Extension

Carrie Stevenson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/12/ethnobotany-where-history-and-medicine-meet-the-forest/

Advanced Forest Site Prep Herbicide Workshop July 13

Minogue Forestry Site prep9 am to 2 pm, July 13, 2016 Eastern

4 FL CEUs, 3.5 CFEs

University of Florida’s North Florida Research and Education Center
155 Research Road, Quincy, FL 32351

AGENDA

  • 8:15 Meet and Greet, coffee
  • 9:00 Welcome, Pat Minogue, R.F.,  Associate Professor of Silviculture
  • 9:10  Advanced herbicide site preparation for pine plantation management. (50 minutes)
    This lecture will review herbicides labeled and appropriate rates, timing, mixtures and application methods for site-specific herbicide treatments in forest site preparation. The integrated use of herbicides and machinery to prepare sites for planting will be discussed. Selection of appropriate herbicides and combinations for control of problematic species will be reviewed, as well as measures to ensure compliance with Organo-Auxin and other Florida pesticide regulations and Florida Silviculture BMPs to protect water quality. New research findings will be presented to support lecture content.
  • 10:00 Advances in aerial application technology (30 minutes)
    A review of advanced technology in aerial application for the non-pilot audience will detail methods to mitigate drift and off target application during helicopter or fixed wing aerial application for forestry and natural areas vegetation management.
  • 10:30 Break
  • 10:45 Basics on Forestry Surfactants (spray additives) (30 minutes)
    We will review the different types of surfactants, how they work to improve herbicide performance, the use of drift control agents, the consequence of excessive surfactants (drift), herbicide formulations and the appropriate additives, oil emulsion carrier technology, and correct mixing procedures.
  • 11:15 How Herbicides Work? (50 minutes)
    By understanding how herbicides move into the plant, how they move within the plant, and how they work as a herbicide (mode of action), we can make better decisions on the choice of herbicide and avoid mixing incompatible herbicides. We will also review herbicide toxicity and chemical characteristics as they relate to environmental fate.
  • 11:55  BRING YOUR OWN LUNCH, on the patio
  • 12:30 Caravan to the Brucefield on the NFREC campus (2 miles)
  • 12:45 The Prescription Process (60 minutes)
    Important considerations in developing vegetation management prescriptions will be reviewed.  There is a diagnostic process that involves matching a suitable herbicide program with specific silvicultural goals and operational and regulatory constraints.
  • 1:45 Return to the Main Building and Adjourn by 2:00 pm
This free workshop is for natural resource managers who are responsible for site preparation decisions or implementation. Herbicide applicators, consulting foresters, Florida Fish and WildlifeConservation Commission Biologists, Florida Forest Service Foresters, employees of forest industry and private landowners are encouraged to attend. Call Megan,the University of Florida NFREC receptionist, at (850) 875-7100 to RSVP. Attendance is limited to 80 people due to space constraints.

PG

Author: Pat Minogue – pminogue@ufl.edu


http://nfrec.ifas.ufl.edu

Pat Minogue

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/06/18/advanced-forest-site-prep-herbicide-workshop-july-13/

Forest Service offering Cogongrass Control Cost-Share Program

Photo credit: C. Evans, UGA

Cogongrass infestations negatively affect tree growth, wildlife habitat, and property values. Photo credit: C. Evans, UGA

The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services announced on April 20, 2016 that the Florida Forest Service is now accepting applications for the Cogongrass Treatment Cost-Share Program. Applications for the program will be accepted through July 29, 2016.

“Cogongrass is one of the most aggressive weeds in Florida and is capable of rapidly choking out and displacing our native plant species,” said Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam. “Through the Cogongrass Treatment Cost-Share Program, landowners can help stop the spread of this harmful pest in Florida.”

Cogongrass is an invasive, non-native grass that occurs in Florida and several other southeastern states. Cogongrass infestations negatively affect tree regeneration, growth and survival, as well as wildlife habitat, native plant diversity, forage quality and property values. They also increase the risk of wildfires and alter fire behavior.

“Left untreated, invasive cogongrass can spread quickly, causing long-term problems,” said State Forester Jim Karels. “In addition to reducing the productivity and value of forests and rangelands, it can greatly increase the risk and severity of wildfire.”

The Cogongrass Treatment Cost-Share Program, which is supported through a grant from the USDA Forest Service, is offered for non-industrial private lands in all Florida counties. It provides reimbursement of 50 percent of the cost to treat cogongrass infestations with herbicide for two consecutive years.

To obtain an application form or to learn more about program requirements, contact your local Florida Forest Service County Forester or visit the Cogongrass Treatment Cost-Share Program web page. All qualifying applications will be evaluated and ranked for approval.

The Florida Forest Service, a division of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, manages more than 1 million acres of public forest land while protecting homes, forestland and natural resources from the devastating effects of wildfire on more than 26 million acres. Learn more about the Florida Forest Service.

Cogongrass Treatment Cost-Share Program

FFS Cost-Share Application

 

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/04/30/forest-service-offering-cogongrass-control-cost-share-program/

Florida’s Forest Stewardship: Integrate Wildlife and Forestry Workshop October 15

Florida’s Forest Stewardship: Integrate Wildlife and Forestry Workshop October 15

Integrating Forestry & Wildlife TourOctober 15, 2015 – 8:30 am–3:30 pm ET

Dixie Plantation

1583 Livingston Rd, Greenville, FL 32331

Wildlife and timber are important objectives for many forest landowners. Integrating forestry and wildlife management starts with setting realistic timber, wildlife and economic objectives;and a long-term management plan that addresses the management strategies to meet them. This workshop will cover some of the strategies that can be used to integrate wildlife and forestry objectives and available assistance programs.

Agenda:

Integrating Forestry & Wildlife Agenda

Registration: Cost is $ 5.00, includes lunch and materials.

Register online at http://fsp-workshop101515.eventbrite.com/ or call Jefferson County Extension at (850) 342-0187.  Space is limited, so register soon. Please share with others who may be interested.

Directions to Dixie Plantation: 1583 Livingston Rd, Greenville, FL 32331
From US Hwy 221, about 10 miles north of Greenville, turn west on SR 146
Travel about 3.5 miles on SR 146 to Livingston Road
Turn north (right) on Livingston Road
Travel about 3.5 miles to the Main House
                                                      .
From Monticello, take SR 146 east about 10 miles to Livingston Road and turn north (left)
Turn north (right) on Livingston Road
Travel about 3.5 miles to the Main HouseDemers Sponsors

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Author: Jed Dillard – dillardjed@ufl.edu

Jefferson County Livestock and Natural Resources Agent with a commercial cow/calf background. My degree is in animal breeding, but I do more work wth forage systems. Long time clover/legume booster for both livestock and wildlife

Jed Dillard

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/09/19/floridas-forest-stewardship-integrate-wildlife-and-forestry-workshop-october-15/

Forest Stewardship Property Tour April 23

Forest Stewardship Property Tour April 23

Tour HeaderAgenda:

Thursday, April 23, 2015. Sign in, meet and greet at 9:00 AM Eastern. Adjourn after lunch.

Tour:

Spring Canyon LLC is a beautiful 100-acre property owned by Helen and Tom Roth. The property is home to steephead ravines and longleaf pine-wire grass sandhills. This will be a moderately strenuous hike on some steep terrain, but well worth the effort!  Helen has traced the history of the property back to 1926 near the end of the turpentine era. Their goal is to improve the upland habitat for threatened and endangered plants and animals. Through a lot of hard work and assistance from the Forest Stewardship Program and USDA Conservation Programs, Helen and Tom are working to restore the uplands back to what they were before many decades of fire exclusion. They are removing hardwoods to allow light to reach longleaf pine seedlings and understory grasses and forbs, and getting fire back in the system. Some larger flowering and fruiting hardwoods are left for wildlife and aesthetic value. In addition to working on and enjoying her property, Helen loves to use the property to educate others about the benefits of active management in restoring the plant and animal communities at Spring Canyon. Join us for a tour. Unique plants in bloom at the time of the tour should include mountain laurel, Florida anise and others. Be prepared for walking.

Register:

Cost is $ 10 per person, lunch and materials included. Register online at https://fsp-tour042315.eventbrite.com/.  Alternatively, you can reserve a space by calling Gadsden County Extension at (850) 875-7255. Payment can be made onsite with cash or a check, payable to University of Florida.  Space will be limited so please register early. Directions to the property are on the back. Please share this announcement with others who may be interested. Contact Chris Demers, (352) 846-2375, cdemers@ufl.edu, for more information about Forest Stewardship Program events.
Download the flyer that includes driving directionsForest Stewardship Spring Canyon Tour 2015
Forest Stewarship Sponsor
.

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/03/14/forest-stewardship-property-tour-april-23/

Forest Certification Workshops January 9 & 23

Forest Certification Workshops  January 9 & 23

UF IFAS Ext 2013School of Forestry logoForest Certification: Forests, Labels, Mills, & More

2 dates and 2 locations:

  1. January 9, 2014 – 9:00am to 3:00pm
    UF/IFAS Jackson County Extension Office, Marianna, FL

  2. January, 23 2014 (RESCHEDULED) – 9:00am to 3:00pm
    UF/IFAS Walton County Extension Office, DeFuniak Springs, FL

Consumers are increasingly concerned about the origins of the products they buy and the standards by which those products are processed. This concern has increased demands for certified wood products from certified forests. The Southeastern United States has become a key source region where this demand can be fulfilled.

Voluntary participation in forest certification programs is growing in Southeastern United States.  The Florida Forest Service and the University of Florida have collaborated to organize education opportunities for anyone interested in forest certification. Do you want to know about the different types of forest certification?  Do you want to know how forest certification can benefit you? Do you want to know the process to get your forest certified? This workshop is for you.

The morning session will focus on the current status of the major certification systems in North America and the group certification process for each of the systems. The afternoon session will cover chain of custody and certified forest product labeling.  There are also 3.5 Society of American Forester (SAF) Continuing Forestry Education (CFE’s) credits approved for these workshops.

Agenda for Workshops
Forest Certification: Forests, Labels, Mills, & More

Morning Session (all times Central)

  • 9:00 am Registration ($ 15.00)
  • 9:15 Welcome and Introductions Rose Godfrey, University of Florida, Extension Outreach Coordinator
  • 9:30 Forest Certification Overview
    Chris Demers, University of Florida, Forest Stewardship Coordinator
  • 10:00 American Tree Farm System – Group Certification
    Shawn Cook, American Tree Farm System
  • 10:30 Moring Break
  • 10:45 Sustainable Forestry Initiative – Group Certification
    Scott Berg, President, R.S. Berg & Associates Inc.
  • 11:15 Forest Stewardship Council – Group Certification
    Darrel Pendris, US Southeast Regional Manager
  • 12:00 Lunch (provided)

Afternoon Session

  • 1:00 Chain of Custody 101 Dr. Jeff Stringer, University of Kentucky
  • 1:30 Afternoon Break
  • 1:45 Sustainable Forestry Initiative – Labels for Forest Products
    Scott Berg, Pres. R.S. Berg & Associates
  • 2:15 Forest Stewardship Council – Labels for Forest Products
    Darrel Pendris, US SE Regional Manager
  • 2:45 Final Questions, Closing Remarks, CFEs, Evaluations
  • 3:00 Adjourn

Register or RSVP Now:  Cost is $ 15, materials, lunch and breaks included. You can register on Eventbrite or RSVP and pay at the door.  Minimum 10 participants per location.

  1. Register for the Jackson County Workshop (1/9/14):
    https://fcp-workshopmarianna3.eventbrite.com
    .  If you would prefer to RSVP by phone and then pay at the event, you can reserve a space by contacting the UF/IFAS Jackson County Extension Office at (850) 482-9620. Payment can be made on-site with cash or a check, payable to University of Florida.
    Download the printer friendly flyer:   Forest Certification Workshop Jackson Co Jan 9
  2. Walton County Workshop (RESCHEDULED:  1/23/14):  http://forestcertificationdefuniaksprings.eventbrite.com.  If you would prefer to RSVP by phone and then pay at the event, you can reserve a space by contacting the UF/IFAS Walton County Extension Office at (850) 892-8172. Payment can be made on-site with cash or a check, payable to University of Florida.  Download the printer friendly flyer:  Forest Certification Workshop Walton Co Jan 23

If you have any questions or need more information, please contact:
Rose Godfrey or (352) 219-8717

 

Florida Forest Service LogoFunding for this workshop is provided by the USDA Forest Service through the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida Forest Service

 

 

 

 

 

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/12/20/forest-certification-workshops-january-9-23/

Forest Certification Workshops December 11 & January 9

UF IFAS Ext 2013School of Forestry logo

Forest Certification: Forests, Labels, Mills & More

2 dates and locations:

December 11, 2013

9:00am to 3:00pm UF/IFAS Walton County Extension Office, DeFuniak Springs, FL

January 9, 2014

9:00am to 3:00pm UF/IFAS Jackson County Extension Office, Marianna, FL

Voluntary participation in forest certification programs is growing in Southeastern United States. The University of Florida IFAS is organizing and hosting a one-day workshop for landowners, policy makers and anyone interested in forest certification in Florida. This workshop will be held in DeFuniak Springs, FL on December 11 at the UF/IFAS Walton County Extension Center, and at the Jackson County Extension Center in Marianna, FL on January 9, 2014.

The morning session will focus on the current status of the major certification systems in North America and the group certification process for each of the systems. The afternoon session will cover chain of custody and certified forest product labeling. SAF Continuing Forestry Education credits for these workshops are pending.

Register Now:  Cost is $ 15, materials, lunch and breaks included. You can register on Eventbrite:

  1. Walton County Workshop (12/11/13): http://fcp-workshopdefuniak2.eventbrite.com/
  2. Jackson County Workshop (1/9/14): http://fcp-workshopmarianna3.eventbrite.com/

 

If you have any question or for more information, please contact:
Rose Godfrey or (352) 219-8717

 

Florida Forest Service LogoFunding for this workshop is provided by the USDA Forest Service through the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida Forest Service

 

 

 

 

 

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/11/23/forest-certification-workshops-december-11-january-9/

Forest Stewardship Tree Farm Tours – November 7,14, & 21

George Owens, Chipley, will be hosting one of three Tree Farm Tours in November.

George Owens, Chipley, will be hosting one of three Tree Farm Tours in November.

Suwanee County – November 7, 2013

Tree Farm Tour at Adventure Plantation
Property of Jeff and Melody Scott, 2013 Florida Tree Farmers of the Year

9 am to 1 pm, Eastern Time

Jeff and Melody received the Florida Tree Farmers of the Year Award for exemplary stewardship of their Suwannee County property, “Adventure Plantation”.   Jeff has been involved in the Scott family Tree Farm for over 25 years with his father; T. A. Scott  who has been involved in the American Tree Farm system since 1977.  With seven children all interested and involved in land management at the farm, this Tree Farm is truly a family-run enterprise.  Join us for a tour of this diverse and productive forest property.

Register now – Filling fast!  You must Pre-Register Before October 25, 2013:
Contact Phil at the Florida Forestry Association, (850) 222-5646 or phil@forestfla.org

Washington County – November 14, 2013

Forest Stewardship Tour at George Owens Farm
Property of George Owens and family

9 am to 1 pm, Central Time

George C. Owens Farm is one of the most renowned silvopasture operations in the Southeastern U.S.  Silvopasture combines trees with forage and livestock production. The trees are managed for high-value saw logs and at the same time provide shade, shelter and forage for livestock, reducing stress and increasing forage production. Properly managed silvopasture can be more productive and often more profitable than either timber or pasture management alone. Come see firsthand how this operation works.   A must-see property and operation.

Register now!  Cost is just $ 10 per person, lunch and materials included. Please register on-line at
http://fsp-tour111413.eventbrite.com/.  Those without Internet access can reserve a space by calling Washington County Extension (850) 638-6180.

Holmes County – November 21, 2013

Forest Stewardship Tour at Kent-Carrol Forests
Property of Ken Carroll and family

9 am to 1 pm, Central Time

Ken Carroll enrolled in Florida’s Forest Stewardship Program in 1999 and hosted a Stewardship tour in 2007. Since then he has expanded the operations to include other agricultural operations, while continuing the management and conservation of forests and wildlife habitat. Features of the property include 4 man-made fish ponds; a CRP pine plantation of 26-year-old slash pines; a 4-year old loblolly pine plantation on 40 acres, a 2-acre blueberry farm of 800 plants for the commercial market; bee hives for honey production and pollination of melons, apples, blueberries, peaches, and plums. Each year they burn 30-50 acres of forests and fight a continuous battle with cogongrass. Old loading zones after thinning are planted in watermelons and cantaloupes for commercial market, or in cold- or warm-season wildlife food plots.  Weather permitting, we’ll demonstrate what happens when cogongrass is burned!

Register Now! Cost is just $ 10 per person, lunch and materials included. Please register on-line at
http://fsp-tour112113.eventbrite.com/
.  Those without Internet access can reserve a space by calling Holmes County Extension (850) 547-1108.

 

More Forest Stewardship events and news at http://floridalandsteward.org

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Jackson County Extension Director, & Livestock & Forages Agent

My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/10/18/forest-stewardship-tree-farm-tours-november-714-21/

Forest Certification Workshop October 17

UF IFAS 2013School of Forestry logo
Forestry and Natural Resource Professionals,

Voluntary participation in forest certification programs is growing in Southeastern United States. Forest managers and forest industry representatives need access to current information on these programs. To meet this need, the University of Florida IFAS is organizing and hosting a one-day workshop for foresters, managers of wood using mills, wood buyers and dealers, loggers and others involved in the management, procurement and utilization of forest resources in Florida. This workshop will be held in Quincy, Florida on October 17 at the UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center and hosted at UF/IFAS Walton and Jackson County Extension facilities via Video Conference.

The morning session will focus on the current status of the major certification systems in North America and the group certification process for each of the systems. The afternoon session will cover chain of custody and certified forest product labeling. SAF Continuing Forestry Education credits for this workshop are pending.

Agenda:  Forest Certification: Forests, Labels, Mills, & More

Morning Session (all times Eastern)

  • 8:00 am Registration ($ 15.00)
  • 8:45 Welcome and Introductions Rose Godfrey, University of Florida, Extension Outreach Coordinator
  • 9:00 Forest Certification Status and Overview Chris Demers, University of Florida, Forest Stewardship Coordinator
  • 10:00 American Tree Farm System – Group Certification Sarah Crow, Certification Manager, American Tree Farm System
  • 10:40 Morning Break
  • 11:00 Sustainable Forestry Initiative – Group Certification Paul Trianosky, Senior Director of Conservation Partnerships
  • 11:40 Forest Stewardship Council – Group Certification Darrel Pendris, US Southeast Regional Manager
  • 12:20 Lunch (provided)

Afternoon Session

  • 1:30 Chain of Custody 101 Dr. Jeff Stringer, University of Kentucky
  • 3:30 Afternoon Break
  • 3:50 Sustainable Forestry Initiative – Labels for Forest Products Paul Trianosky, Senior Director of Conservation Partnerships
  • 4:20 Forest Stewardship Council – Labels for Forest Products Darrel Pendris, US Southeast Regional Manager
  • 4:50 Final Questions, Closing Remarks, CFEs

 

Please register by Monday, October 7, 2013. Cost is $ 15, materials, lunch and breaks included.  You can register on Eventbrite at: https://fcp-workshopquincy1.eventbrite.com

Download the printer friendly flyer:  Forest_Certification_Workshop_10-17-13

For more information, contact the event coordinator:  Rose Godfrey, UF/ IFAS School of Forest Resources and Conservation
rosa23@ufl.edu or (352) 219-8717.

Host Location (Instructors on site):

North Florida Research and Education Center, Quincy
155 Research Rd Quincy, FL 32351-5677
(850) 875-7100

Interactive Video Conference Locations (live video feed):

Walton County UF/IFAS Extension Office
732 N. 9th Street DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433-3804
(850) 892-8172.

Jackson County UF/IFAS Extension Office
2741 Pennsylvania Avenue, Suite 3, Marianna, FL 32448
(850) 482-9620

 

Florida Forest Service LogoFunding for this workshop is provided by the USDA Forest Service through the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida Forest Service

 

 

 

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Jackson County Extension Director, & Livestock & Forages Agent

My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/10/04/forest-certification-workshop-october-17/

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