Tag Archive: January

Financial and Succession Planning Workshop – January 26

January 26, 2017

10 a.m. – 2 p.m. (lunch provided)

Jackson County Extension
2741 Penn Avenue, Marianna, Florida 32448

Join us for a Financial and Succession Planning Workshop!

Strategic Wealth Group from Tallahassee will be leading the workshop. They have an expertise in business and estate planning and specialize in working with farmers.The program will address some key questions:

  • Are you operating under the most efficient form of ownership (LLC, S-Corp, Partnership, Sole Proprietorship)?

  • Are you planning an ownership transition to the next generation in the future?

  • Do you have a buy/sell agreement to protect your business and family? If so, does the agreement accomplish exactly what you want?

  • Do you have key employees and are you worried they may leave you?

  • Have you taken steps to protect your assets from liability arising from farm or personal accidents?

  • Are you paying more taxes than you have to? 

Workshop Flyer:  NWFL Financial and Succession Planning Workshop Flyer

 

Make plans to attend, and please RSVP to 800.527.0647 by January 20, 2017

 

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Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/14/financial-and-succession-planning-workshop-january-26/

December Weather Summary and January Outlook

National Weather Service estimates of rainfall across the Panhandle in December 2016.

December brought quite a change from the previous months of drought.  The National Weather Service estimates for rainfall ranged from isolated locations with over 15″ (purple), large regions with over 10″ (hot pink), to less than 4″ along the coast of Gulf, Franklin, Wakulla and Jefferson Counties (tan and yellow).

The six Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN) stations also documented the range in rainfall in December, from a low of only 3.3″ in Carrabelle to over 12″ in Marianna and DeFuniak.  All six FAWN stations recorded above historic average for the month of December.  For the year, the wettest location was at the station in Defuniak, with 63.1″ in 2016.  The driest location was at Carrabelle with only 48.4″ for the year.  Certainly the rainfall was not uniform in 2016 with Monticello station recording 4.8″ above historic average, while the other five locations were below average for the year.  The Carrabelle location was unusually dry, 7.4″ below historic average for annual rainfall.

Annual averages don’t tell the whole story.  It is not just how much falls in total, but when it comes.  The chart above shows how three months:  March, August, and December made up for the shortfalls the rest of the year at the Marianna location.  For the record it was an average year of 54″ of rain, but July, October and November were serious drought months.

The high rainfall totals in December did ease the drought through the Panhandle, but not uniformly.  Calhoun, Gulf, Liberty, Bay and Leon, as well as portions of Escambia and Jefferson Counties are still listed in the Moderate Drought category.  This may change in the weeks ahead with all of the rain in early January.

Temperatures did continue to cool off from November to December. The average air temperature dropped 4° from 61° to 57° in December, and the average soil temperate dropped 8°, from 69 down to 61.

January Outlook

The Climate Predication Center’s (CPC) outlook for January calls for warmer and wetter than average.  It does seem as if La Niña has lost some of its grip, which should mean continued improvement of drought conditions, at least in the Panhandle.

The CPC is expecting the drought conditions to continue to improve in the Panhandle region, but not necessarily for the rest of Florida.

 

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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/07/december-weather-summary-and-january-outlook/

January Cattle and Forage Management Reminders

January Cattle and Forage Management Reminders

UF/IFAS Beef Cattle & Forage Specialists, and County Extension Agents serving the Florida Panhandle developed a basic management calendar for cattle producers in the region.  The purpose of this calendar is to provide reminders for management techniques with similar timing to those used at the North Florida Research and Education Center’s Beef Unit, near Marianna, Florida.  Links to useful publications with more information are also provided.

Colostrum consumption is a key factor in the long-term health of newborn calves. This calf needs to get up and nurse several times within the first four hours after birth to ensure adequate consumption. (Alachua, Florida)

JANUARY

Cattle Herd Management

Pasture Management

  • Begin grazing winter forage at 10-12 inch canopy height and remove cattle when forage canopy is 4 inches.
    • If possible, limit-graze for 2-3 hours per day, plus free choice hay to acclimate cattle and stretch grazing days
    • After initial grazing, top-dress with 40-50 lbs. N per acre

Pest Management

 Annual Events

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Pan Ag logo finalUse the following link to download the entire Cattle & Forage Management Annual Calendar:

Panhandle Ag Extension Team Cattle & Forage Management Calendar

 

Developed by the Panhandle Agriculture Extension Livestock and Forage Team:

Doug Mayo, Cliff Lamb, Mark Mauldin, Ann Blount, Cheryl Mackowiak, Jose Dubeux, Jay Ferrell, Jennifer Bearden, Nicolas DiLorenzo, Shep Eubanks, Jed Dillard, Mike Goodchild, Roy Carter, Henry Grant, John Atkins, and Kalyn Waters
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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/07/january-cattle-and-forage-management-reminders/

Panhandle Hay Production Conference and Trade Show – January 25

Panhandle Hay Production Conference and Trade Show – January 25

Regardless of weather conditions, the ability to supply ample and nutritious forage is critical for livestock production.  Learn more about this topic at the Hay Production Conference and Trade Show on Wednesday, January 25, 2017, at the Holmes County Ag Center, 1169 E Hwy 90, Bonifay FL.  Presentation topics will include: Fertility and Relative Forage Quality (RFQ), Decision Making for Variety Selection, Pest and Weed Management, Marketing Your Hay and Production Cost, and Understanding Weather Forecasting. Use the following link for the flyer with more details: 

Panhandle Hay Conference 2017

Agenda

  • 7:30 Registration
  • 8:00 Speakers
  • 10:30 Trade-show Break
  • 11:00 Speakers
  • 12:00 Lunch is Served
  • 2:00 Trade Show Closes

The $ 10.00/person registration fee includes lunch and proceedings.

For More Information Contact and to pre-register, please contact:
UF/IFAS Extension Holmes Co. Extension Office
Kalyn Waters, County Extension Director
Phone: 850-547-1108
Email: kalyn.waters@ufl.edu

 

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Author: Kalyn Waters – kalyn.waters@ufl.edu

Holmes County Extension Director working in the areas of Agricultural Management in row crop, natural resources, livestock and forage production. Specialized in Beef Cattle Production in the area of reproductive, nutritional and finical management.
http://holmes.ufl.ifas.edu

Kalyn Waters

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/07/panhandle-hay-production-conference-and-trade-show-january-25/

Managing Forests and Farms for Fish and Wildlife Workshop – January 12

Managing Forests and Farms for Fish and Wildlife Workshop – January 12

Photo: Doug Mayo

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) along with the Florida Forest Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Office of Ag Water Policy, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Farm Credit of Northwest Florida, and University of Florida IFAS Extension will hold a public workshop on Thursday, January 12, 2017 in Marianna to discuss ways to manage forests and farms for fish and wildlife.

Featured topics for the workshop include, but are not limited to, Gopher Tortoise Habitat and Management, Prescribed Burning for Wildlife, Wildlife Best Management Practices, and Cost-share Programs.

The workshop will be from 9:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., CST at the UF/IFAS Jackson County Extension Service Office, 2741 Pennsylvania Ave., Marianna.

Lunch will be provided free of charge, but pre-registration must be complete by January 9. To pre-register for the workshop, contact Billie Clayton at (850) 767-3634.

AGENDA (All times central time)

  • 8:30 – Registration
  • 8:50 – Welcome and Introduction – Arlo Kane, Roy Lima
  • 9:00 – Gopher Tortoise Biology and Management– Arlo Kane, Wildlife Biologist, Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
  • 9:30 – SE American Kestrel Partnership – A new opportunity for landowners – Jeremy Martin, Wildlife Biologist, Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
  • 10:00 – Fire and Wildlife, When and How Should You Burn – Don Buchanan, Wildlife Biologist, Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
  • 10:30 – Break
  • 10:45 – The New Forestry Wildlife BMP’s for State Listed Species – Roy Lima, Forester, Florida Forest Service
  • 11:15 – The New Agricultural Wildlife BMP’s for State Listed Species – Daniel Stanley, Environmental Specialist, FDACS Office of Ag Water Policy
  • 11:45 – FORCES – A New Recognition Program for Forest Landowners – Sonny Greene, FORCES Coordinator
  • 12:30: – Cost Share Assistance Program Opportunities – Mary Jane Nelson, District Conservationist, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service and Barry Stafford, Senior Forester, Florida Forest Service
  • 12:40 – Lunch – Courtesy of Farm Credit of Northwest Florida
  • 1:30 – Adjourn

Download the printer friendly flyer:  Marianna Wildlife BMP workshop flyer Jan 12

 

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Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/07/managing-forests-and-farms-for-fish-and-wildlife-workshop-january-12/

2017 Florida Bull Test Sale – January 21

2017 Florida Bull Test Sale – January 21

University of Florida – North Florida Research and Education Center Beef Unit sale facility where the Florida Bull Test Sale will be conducted.

University of Florida – North Florida Research and Education Center Beef Unit sale facility where the Florida Bull Test Sale will be conducted near Marianna, FL.

The 17th Florida Bull Test was conducted at the University of Florida North Florida Research and Education center in Marianna.  There were 129 consignments from 33 consignors from Florida, Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi.  There were 59 Angus, 3 Brahman, 10 Charolais, 7 Hereford, 32 SimAngus, and 18 Simmental consignments born between August 15 and December 31 of 2015. Bulls were delivered in late July and initiated their 112-day test on August 17, 2016.  The last day of test was December 7, 2016.  In addition, a hallmark of the Florida Bull Test is that individual feed intake is assessed to establish feed efficiency.  At completion of the test the entire group of bulls averaged 3.32 pounds of gain per day, but ranged from 1.85 to 4.73 pounds per day.

Activities with the Bull Test conclude with a sale on Saturday, January 21, 2017 at the NFREC Beef Unit in Marianna, FL. Only bulls meeting specific benchmarks are eligible for the sale.  In addition, bulls are inspected for structural soundness and disposition, and must pass a breeding soundness exam to qualify for the sale.  Additional information, such as actual performance data, expected progeny differences (EPDs), and carcass ultrasound data is available for bull buyers to aid in the selection of excellent quality bulls to purchase.

Internet bidding will be available at the sale. Potential buyers will need to preregister to on the Cattle in Motion, LLC website (http://www.cattleinmotion.com/ ) prior to initiation of the sale.  Their site will also host videos of each bull to preview prior to the sale.

For more information on the Florida Bull Test visit the web page at http://nfrec.ifas.ufl.edu/florida-bull-test/, or telephone 850-526-1621. Catalogs for the sale are available by request. Note: the Research Center office will be closed from December 26 to January 2.

 

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Author: Cliff Lamb – gclamb@ufl.edu

Cliff Lamb

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/12/17/2017-florida-bull-test-sale-january-21/

Tri-State Cucurbit Meeting – January 19

Tri-State Cucurbit Meeting – January 19

 

Farmers with prize watermelons. Image from Smathers Archives.

Farmers with prize watermelons. Image from Smathers Archives.

The 2017 Tri-State Cucurbit Meeting will be held on Thursday, January 19, at the Jackson County Agricultural Conference Center, 2741 Pennsylvania Avenue, Marianna, Florida.

Registration opens at 7:30 AM (Central Time) and the event will end with a sponsored lunch. This meeting will provide the latest research information for commercial growers of watermelons, cantaloupe, squash, and other cucurbits.

Topics that will be addressed include: insect, weed, and disease management, cucurbit varieties, and water and nutrient management. Additionally, pesticide CEUs will be available. Speakers include research and extension faculty from the University of Florida/IFAS.

The registration fee for the event is $ 5.00 and includes materials and lunch. You can register online at: https://tristatecucurbitmeeting2017.eventbrite.com. You are welcome to pay at the door, but please RSVP with Jackson County Extension at: 850-482-9620. The Tri-state Cucurbit Meeting is hosted by Jackson, Washington, and Holmes County Extension agents in cooperation with research faculty in Florida.

Agenda

  • 7:30 – Registration Opens
  • 8:10 – Update on the Panhandle Cucurbit Industry 
    Shep Eubanks, UF/IFAS Holmes County Extension
  • 8:20 – Cucurbit Disease Control
    Matthews Paret, UF/IFAS Plant Pathologist
  • 9:10 – Cucurbit Variety Trial Summary
    Josh Freeman, UF/IFAS Vegetable Specialist
  • 10:00  Break
  • 10:30 – Water & Nutrient Management
    Bob Hochmuth, UF/IFAS Extension, Suwannee Valley Agricultural Extension Center
  • 11:20 – Attracting Beneficials in Squash Production
    Oscar Liburd, UF/IFAS Entomologist
  • 12:10 – Meet with Vendors
  • 12:30 – Lunch
  • 12:50 – Closing Remarks & Conclusion
  • 1:00 – Adjourn

Download the printer friendly flyer:

Tri-State Cucurbit Meeting Flyer

 

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Author: Matt Lollar – mlollar@ufl.edu

Matt Lollar is the Jackson County Horticulture Agent. He has 5 years of experience with University of Florida/IFAS Extension and he began his career in Sanford, FL as the Seminole County Horticulture Agent. Matt is originally from Belle Fontaine, AL. He earned his MS and BS degrees in Horticulture Production from Auburn University.

Matt Lollar

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/12/17/tri-state-cucurbit-meeting-january-19/

Florida Heifer Development Program Hosts Workshop January 6

Florida Heifer Development Program Hosts Workshop January 6

Heifers from the 2016 UF/IFAS Florida Heifer Development Program at the NFREC-Marianna. Photo Credit: K. Waters

Heifers entered in the 2016 Florida Heifer Development Program, at the North Florida Research and Education Center, Marianna. Photo: K. Waters

The investment of time and resources that are required for replacement heifer develop is substantial. However, effective heifer development is critical for continued success within a cattle production system. Research has provided developmental benchmark and practice establishment that will lead to effective heifer development. In addition, advancements in technologies, such as artificial insemination and estrous synchronization protocols, have allowed for continued improvement in replacement heifer development strategies.

On January 6th, 2017 the Florida Heifer Development Program will host a workshop that will focus on replacement heifer development, and the practices that will help producers effectively develop their future cow herd. The meeting will be held at the Beef Unit Pavilion at the North Florida Research and Education Center, Marianna, with registration starting at 8:30 AM Central Time.  The day will start with educational presentations; Dr. Cliff Lamb will serve as the key-note speaker, and Kalyn Waters will also present. Following the presentations, participants will be able to take part in chute-side demonstrations. Lunch will be sponsored by Zoetis, and following lunch, bulls from the Florida Bull Test, which will be offered for sale on January 21, 2017, will be available for preview until 2:30 PM.. fhdp-education-meeting_-flyer_1-6-17Please RSVP to the UF/IFAS Holmes County Extension Office at 850-547-1108 by January 2, 2017 (RSVP is appreciated but not required for attendance).

Download the printer friendly flyer to share with other producers that might be interested in attending:  Replacement Heifer Development Workshop flyer

The UF/IFAS  Florida Heifer Development Program was designed to meet the following objectives:

  1. To successfully develop beef replacement heifers for cattle producers using research-based data on nutritional and reproductive management, to enhance lifetime productivity of heifers in the beef herd.
  2. To provide an educational resource that exposes beef cattle producers to improved animal management techniques associated with development of replacement beef heifers, and educational opportunities that focus on herd health, nutritional management, and artificial insemination.

If you have any questions about the workshop, or the Florida Heifer Development Program, please contact Kalyn Waters at 850-547-1108.

 

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Author: Kalyn Waters – kalyn.waters@ufl.edu

Holmes County Extension Director working in the areas of Agricultural Management in row crop, natural resources, livestock and forage production. Specialized in Beef Cattle Production in the area of reproductive, nutritional and finical management.
http://holmes.ufl.ifas.edu

Kalyn Waters

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/12/17/florida-heifer-development-program-hosts-workshop-january-6/

Understanding and Applying Bull Performance Data – January 10

Understanding and Applying Bull Performance Data – January 10

Selecting the right bull(s) is a key component to the success of any cattle operation. Understanding and Applying Performance Data is a class designed to help cattlemen effectively utilize the data that is available to them.

Selecting the right bull(s) is a key component to the success of any cattle operation. Understanding and Applying Performance Data is a class designed to help cattlemen effectively utilize the data that is available to them. Photo Credit: Mark Mauldin

Bull selection is one of the fastest ways for a cattleman to change the quality of his calf crop from one year to the next. It is difficult to overstate the importance of the bull. In a small herd, half of the genetic potential of the entire calf crop is determined by a single individual, the bull. Even in larger herds with multiple bulls, the impact of each individual bull can be wide spread, especially if he sires heifers that are returned to the herd. That being said, bull selection is an important management decision that should be taken seriously.

When it is time to purchase a new bull, many cattlemen find themselves overwhelmed with the amount of data that is available to “help” them select the most appropriate bull(s) for their operation. Most cattlemen enjoy picking out the best looking bull in a group. While looks (phenotype) can be important, the traits the bull will pass on to his calves will have more effect on the ranch’s bottom line. These traits are dictated by the bull’s genetic makeup (genotype). To help inform bull buyers about the genetic merit of individual bulls the cattle industry has developed a plethora of ways to quantify and represent genotypes. These representations (EPDs, Indexes, etc.) are collectively referred to as performance data, and they constitute all of those numbers fill sale catalogues.

On Tuesday, January 10th, UF/IFAS Extension will host Understanding and Applying Performance Data at the Washington County Agricultural Center. The primary goal of this class is to help commercial cattlemen decipher all of the performance data available, and develop a practical plan for utilizing these resources when selecting bulls for their own operations. Event details are in the flyer below. If you have questions contact Mark Mauldin, 850-638-6180 or mdm83@ufl.edu

epd-class-flyer

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Author: Mark Mauldin – mdm83@ufl.edu

I am the Agriculture and Natural Resources agent in Washington County. My program areas include livestock and forage, row crops, and pond management.
http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu

Mark Mauldin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/12/03/understanding-and-applying-bull-performance-data-january-10/

Fooling Mother Nature for January Foals

Fooling Mother Nature for January Foals

Horses are seasonal breeders

Source: Myhorseuniversit.vudat.msu.edu

Source: Myhorseuniversit.vudat.msu.edu

When day length is getting shorter, mares begin to grow winter hair coats, their estrous cycles become erratic, then they stop ovulating for a period of time that is called anestrous.  After December 21st (winter solstice) the days begin to lengthen. The mare perceives subtle changes in daylight and, as spring approaches, she begins to shed her winter coat and her reproductive system begins to “wake up.” This time of year is called transition.  During transition mares will develop follicles and display behavioral signs of estrus, but they do not ovulate. Without an ovulation, the mare cannot become pregnant. On average, the date of first ovulation in horses in the Northern hemisphere is April 1st. If a mare does not become pregnant, she will come in heat and ovulate about every 21 days throughout the breeding season. The natural breeding season for horses is April 15th through August with the greatest fertility in June (longest day of the year). Considering an average gestation length of 340 days, a mare that is bred April – June will foal March – May. It is noteworthy that a mare bred in the natural breeding season will foal at an optimal time of year for foal survival. Day length is the environmental “cue” that synchronizes reproductive cyclicity with season of the year.

Universal birth date

Source: horsecoursesonline.com

Mare in heat. Source: horsecoursesonline.com

January 1st is the universal birthday for registered horses. Regardless of actual birth date, they are classified a year older each time they pass January 1st.  Most horses are not fully mature until they are four years old. For showing or racing events involving young horses (<4 years old) there is potentially a competitive advantage for horses born earlier in the year rather than later in the year, because a January born two year old will likely be more growthy than a May born two year old. For this reason, the show and race horse industry’s imposed breeding season begins February 15th and ends June 15th. What this means for the breeding shed manager is that many people are trying to breed mares that are still in transition. It can be very frustrating because mares may be showing signs of heat but are not ovulating. Having your veterinarian confirm ovulation is the best way to know the breeding season has officially begun for your mare.

Fooling Mother Nature

tenbroeck-articfical-lighting-2The use of artificial lighting to hasten the onset of the breeding season has been well documented in horses. Exposing mares to extra hours of light alters the mare’s perception of day length. The addition of 2-3 hours of light at dusk is more effective than early morning light or 24 hours of light. The response to extended days takes about 60-90 days, so if you want to breed mares February-March, you should begin your light treatments no later than December 15th. Bringing pastured mares in for their supper in the evening and putting the lights on an automatic timer is a practical way to provide the “long day” experience.  A 200 watt bulb in a 12X12 stall is sufficient (2 foot candles) illumination to achieve a response. If you do not want to stall horses, you can use flood lights in outside pens. The lighting regime should continue until the mare is pregnant, or until after April 1st, whichever comes first.

Two things to remember:

  • If you breed mares before February 15th, you run the risk of having foals born in December.  The result,  January 1st your newborn foal would be considered a year old.
  • Remember that a side effect of extended daylight is the shedding of hair.  During February cold snaps, you may need to protect your mares from freezing weather.

tenbroek-hair-shedding

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Author: Saundra TenBroeck – sht@ufl.edu

Saundra TenBroeck

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/12/02/fooling-mother-nature-for-january-foals/

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