Tag Archive: LIVE

Plants Don’t Live Forever

A New Yorker cartoon shows a lady shopping a garden center bench for plants. She has three choices at three price points: annuals, $ 6; perennials, $ 10; eternals, $ 749.95.

No matter what the cost, plants don’t live forever. And if they did, what would they cost? They’d probably cost more than $ 749.95. Even though we know plants don’t live forever, we still don’t want a plant that we purchased, planted and cared for to die an early death.

All too often, I find myself in the position of reminding a person of this fact of life – plants don’t live forever.

Palm in decline.
Credit: Edward F. Gilman, UF/IFAS.

There are extremes, though. The bristlecone pine can live thousands of years. There is one that was named Methuselah, which, at one time, was believed to be the oldest living tree on record approaching more than 4,800 years of age in central California. But in the 1970’s, offspring of Methuselah all died because they were sent to low-altitude locations. The parent tree’s location in the White Mountains is two miles above sea level.

Even though the bristlecone pine can live thousands of years, misplacing it (planted at too low an altitude) results in the tree living a fraction of its potential life. The point is to plant the right plant in the right place. Make sure the plant is well suited for Florida and to the site conditions: that wet site, that dry site, that salty site, that high pH site, that shady site, that sunny site, etc.

The second point is to have realistic expectations based on the plant species. Some plants genetically will live longer than others. One of our longest-lived tree species in Florida is the live oak. There are live oak trees in Florida that are hundreds of years old. But don’t expect a silver maple to make it that long. It’s a shorter-lived tree species. In Florida, a thirty-year-old silver maple is probably in a state of decline due to old age.

The third point is to learn how to correctly plant and maintain the plants you have. For example, most woody plants (trees and shrubs), will live a much shorter life simply from being planted too deep. And an over fertilized centipedegrass lawn will go into a state of decline resulting in the lawn living a shorter life.

Plant the right plant in the right place, learn what it likes and provide it. And when the plant reaches the end of its life, replace it.

Many homeowners spend more than $ 749.95 attempting to turn a short-lived plant into an eternal plant.

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Author: Larry Williams – llw5479@ufl.edu

Larry Williams is the County Extension Director and Residential Horticulture Agent for the UF/IFAS Extension Office in Okaloosa County.

Larry Williams

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/18/plants-dont-live-forever/

Salmonella Outbreaks Linked to Contact with Live Poultry

Salmonella Outbreaks Linked to Contact with Live Poultry

Even cute, seemingly healthy baby chicks and ducks can carry Salmonella bacteria. Photo by Judy Biss

Last summer the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported 611 people from 45 states got Salmonella infections from contact with their poultry.  This year, through the end of May 2017, 372 people from 47 states have gotten sick from Salmonella infections related to poultry.  Of the 372, 71 were hospitalized, and 133 (36%) of the ill people were children under the age of 5.  No deaths have been reported.

Number of outbreak strain Salmonella cases by state. Source: https://www.cdc.gov/zoonotic/gi/outbreaks/live-poultry-map.html

Poultry can carry Salmonella and show no signs of illness. Salmonella germs are spread from poultry through their droppings. The droppings or anything that has been in contact with droppings (the birds’ feet, legs, feathers, cages, etc.) can have Salmonella germs present. When humans come into contact with a contaminated surface they can pick up the germs. In order for Salmonella to make people sick it must enter the body, usually through the mouth. Careful, thorough, hand washing is key to protecting yourself from Salmonella if you are in contact with live poultry or facilities where poultry have been kept.

People become infected with Salmonella when they put their contaminated hands or other things that have been in contact with live poultry in or around their mouth. Young children are more likely to get sick because their immune systems are still developing and they are more likely to put their fingers or other items into their mouths. Some people who have contact with items in the area where poultry live can become ill without actually touching one of the birds.  Germs on your hands can spread easily to other people or surfaces, which is why it’s important to wash hands immediately after touching poultry or anything in the area where they live and roam.  Centers for Disease Control

CDC’s Advice for Small Poultry Flock Owners

Contact with live poultry and their environment can make people sick with Salmonella infections. Live poultry can be carrying Salmonella bacteria but appear healthy and clean and show no signs of illness. Follow these steps for protecting yourself and others while enjoying backyard poultry:

  • Always wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water right after touching live poultry or anything in the area where they live and roam. Also wash your hands after handling clothes and shoes that have touched live poultry. Adults should supervise hand washing for young children.
    • If soap and water are not readily available, use hand sanitizer until you are able to wash your hands with soap and water.
  • Do not let live poultry inside the house, in bathrooms, or especially in areas where food or drink is prepared, served, or stored, such as kitchens or outdoor patios.
    • Do not eat or drink in the area where the birds live or roam.
  • Children younger than 5 years, adults older than 65, and people with weakened immune systems should not handle or touch chicks, ducklings, or other live poultry. People in these groups are more likely to have a severe illness from Salmonella infection.
  • Do not snuggle or kiss the birds, touch your mouth, or eat or drink around live poultry.
  • Stay outdoors when cleaning any equipment or materials used to raise or care for live poultry, such as cages, feed, or water containers.
  • Read CDC’s recommendations for taking care of your backyard flock, which apply to all live poultry, regardless of the age of the birds or where they were purchased.

Human Salmonella Infection Symptoms and Treatment

According to the CDC, Salmonella infections in people may cause diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and abdominal cramps.  Salmonella infections in people are usually resolved within 5-7 days with minimal treatment, other than drinking plenty of fluids. Severe diarrhea may require hospitalization for re-hydration with intravenous fluids.  Make physicians aware of potential contamination from contact with poultry.  Lab tests are recommended to determine if Salmonella is the cause of the illness.   Infants, elderly persons, and those with weakened immune systems are more likely than others to develop severe illness. In cases of severe infection, Salmonella can spread from the intestines through the bloodstream throughout the body.  Death can result from severe infections without prompt antibiotic treatment.

Links to more information on this subject:

Salmonella Infections Linked to Live Poultry in 2017

CDC’s Salmonella website

What Are the Risks of Contracting Diseases Associated with Chickens?

 

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Author: Mark Mauldin – mdm83@ufl.edu

I am the Agriculture and Natural Resources agent in Washington County. My program areas include livestock and forage, row crops, and pond management.
http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu

Mark Mauldin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/07/08/salmonella-outbreaks-linked-to-contact-with-live-poultry-2/

Common Live Oak Problems and Solutions

Common Live Oak Problems and Solutions

 

The Live Oak (Quercus virginiana) is one of the most iconic figures of the Deep South. Mentioning the words Live Oak invokes all sorts of romantic nostalgia of yesteryear and the reputation is not unearned. In fact, many Live Oaks still stand that were growing on American soil when the first English settlers set foot on Plymouth Rock. They are long-lived, picturesque trees that also happen to be nearly bulletproof in the landscape. Given these factors, it is not surprising that Live Oak is far and away the most common tree included in both residential and commercial landscapes in the Coastal South. However, even the venerable Live Oak is not without its problems; this article will discuss a few of the more common issues seen with this grand species.

The Angel Oak near Charleston, SC

The Angel Oak near Charleston, SC

Few conditions afflict live oak but when they do, improper planting or cultural practices are usually at play. Observing the following best management practices will go a long way toward ensuring the long-term health of a planted Live Oak:

  • Remember to always plant trees a little higher than the surrounding soil to prevent water standing around the trunk or soil piling up around it, both of these issues frequently cause rot to occur at the base of the tree.
  • If planting a containerized tree, remember to score the rootball to prevent circling roots that will eventually girdle the tree. If planting a B&B (Balled and Burlap) specimen, remember to remove the strapping material from the top of the wire basket, failure to do this can also result in the tree being girdled.

Live Oak has few insect pests but there are some that prove bothersome to homeowners. The following are two of the most common pests of Live Oaks and how to manage them:

Typical galling on Live Oak

Typical galling on Live Oak

 

Galls are cancerous looking growths that appear on the leaves and twigs of Live Oak from time to time and are caused by gall wasps that visit the tree and lay their eggs inside the leaf or stem of the plant. The larvae hatch and emerge from the galls the following spring to continue the cycle. These galls are rarely more than aesthetically displeasing, however it is good practice to remove and destroy gall infected stems/leaves from younger trees as gall formation may cause some branch dieback or defoliation. Chemical control is rarely needed or practical (due to the very specific time the wasps are outside the tree and active) in a home landscape situation.

  • Black Twig Borers can also be problematic. These little insects seldom kill a tree but their damage (reduction of growth and aesthetic harm) can be substantial. Infestations begin in the spring in Northwest Florida, with the female twig borer drilling a pen-head sized hole in a large twig or small branch and then laying her eggs in the ensuing cavity. She then transmits an ambrosia fungus that grows in the egg-cavity, providing food for the borer, other borer adults, and her offspring that take up residence and over-winter in the twig. The activity of the insects in the twig has an effect similar to girdling; the infected twig will rapidly brown and die, making removal and destruction of the infected branches a key component

 

In conclusion, though there are a few problems that can potentially arise with Live Oak, its premier status and continued widespread use in the landscape is warranted and encouraged. It should be remembered that, relative to most other candidates for shade trees in the landscape, Live Oak is extremely durable, long-lived, and one of most pest and disease free trees available. Happy growing!

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Author: dleonard – d.leonard@ufl.edu

dleonard

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/07/26/common-live-oak-problems-and-solutions/

“Panhandle Outdoors LIVE!” Schedule for 2016

Florida's ..... Photo by Judy Biss

Explore some of the Panhandle’s hidden ecological treasures with UF/IFAS Panhandle Outdoors Live! Photo by Judy Biss

Northwest Florida is considered one of the top six biodiversity hotspots in the country. The reasons why begin with our unique water features.  Join us to explore these waters and learn more about the Panhandle’s hidden ecological treasures!

“Panhandle Outdoors LIVE!” is stepping it up a notch for 2016.  This year we’ll explore four Panhandle water resources of regional significance – the Wakulla Springshed, St. Joe Bay, the Econfina Watershed, and Weeks Bay.  Two are in the eastern Panhandle; two are in the west (one even in Alabama).

First up is the Panhandle Outdoors LIVE! – Wakulla Springshed School on March 1-2. It will base out of the magnificent “Old Florida” Wakulla Springs Lodge south of Tallahassee, and feature field trips to Leon Sinks Geological Area, Cherokee Sink and the Wakulla River – concluding with an optional paddle downriver from Wakulla Springs through a transition of ecosystems to historic Fort San Marcos de Apalachee, where the Wakulla joins the St. Marks River.

Next up, on April 4-5, is Panhandle Outdoors LIVE! – Weeks Bay Watershed School that will base out of the Episcopal Beckwith Camp and Retreat Center on Weeks Bay in Fairhope (Baldwin County) Alabama. This second watershed school will focus on the Weeks Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, and feature a demonstration of oyster farming and a kayak paddle trip.

For more detailed information, and to register, for the Wakulla Springshed School visit – http://pol-2016-wakulla-springshed.eventbrite.com

For more information on the April overnight school to Weeks Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve contact Rick O’Connor

For more information on the August day school on the Ecofina River contact Laura Tiu

For more information on the September overnight school to St. Joe Bay contact Erik Lovestrand

Here is a printable flyer with all the details:  Panhandle Outdoors 2016

 

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Author: Judy Biss – judy.ludlow@ufl.edu

Judy Ludlow is the Agriculture and Natural Resource Agent in Calhoun County, Florida

Judy Biss

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/02/07/panhandle-outdoors-live-schedule-for-2016/

Panhandle Outdoors LIVE – Watershed School – Week’s Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve

Panhandle Outdoors LIVE – Watershed School – Week’s Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve

Weeks Bay.weeksbay.org

Fishermen fish the marshes of Weeks Bay while a pelican looks on. Photo: WeeksBay.org

Mobile Bay?… part of the Florida panhandle?… Really?…

Well… yes… during the colonial period “West Florida” extended west to the Biloxi area and besides, all western panhandlers know we are really “lower Alabama”; we hear it a million times a year… so YES, it’s part of the Florida panhandle! We’ll go with it.

The shallow, muddy, and productive waters of Mobile Bay as they pass the port city of Mobile AL. Photo: Auburn University

The shallow, muddy, and productive waters of Mobile Bay as they pass the port city of Mobile AL.
Photo: Auburn University

Approximately 35 miles long and 10 miles wide, Mobile Bay is one of the largest estuaries on the Gulf coast; draining close to 1/5th of the eastern United States.  This wide, shallow, and muddy bay supports a variety of fresh and brackish water ecosystems.  Wildlife from the Mississippi delta, the red hills of the Piedmont region, and the Florida panhandle all converge here making this one of the more biologically diverse areas in the country.  It was home to both Dr. E.O. Wilson and Dr. Archie Carr who deeply loved the area and it has been a hub for estuarine research for decades.  The rich abundance of wildlife supports commercial and recreational fishing and hunting as well as a growing ecotourism industry.  Though the shallow bay must be dredged to support it, the Port of Mobile in one of the busiest in the Gulf region.

 

Weeks Bay is a small tributary to this bay system. Fed by the Fish and Magnolia Rivers on the southeastern shore of Mobile Bay, Weeks Bay discharges into Bon Secour, which supports a commercial fishing business.  Lined with salt marshes, cypress swamps, and bogs, this area is great for wildlife viewing and fishing.  It is also the area of Mobile Bay that experiences the famous crab jubilees; where levels of low dissolved oxygen on the bottom of the bay force benthic animals – such as crabs and flounder – to shallow water seeking oxygen.  About 6,000 acres of this estuarine habitat is now part of NOAA’s National Estuarine Research Reserve system.  At the reserve there are interactive exhibits, trails, and pontoon boat rides to explore and appreciate this special place.

Crab jubilees occur along the eastern shore of Mobile Bay during very warm summer evenings. Photo: NOAA

Crab jubilees occur along the eastern shore of Mobile Bay during very warm summer evenings.
Photo: NOAA

What better place to learn about the estuaries of the Gulf coast! The Panhandle Outdoor LIVE program will conduct one of our four 2016 watershed schools at this reserve.  We will have lectures on estuarine ecology, the seafood industry in Mobile Bay – highlighting oyster farming, and on the mission of the Research Reserve itself.  We will also have a local outfitter lead a kayak/canoe trip through the estuary as well an interpretive nature hike at the reserve’s visitor center.  It will be set up as an overnight trip for those traveling and we will be staying at Camp Beckwith, which on Weeks Bay.  Registration for this trip will open at the end of February.  If you have questions about this watershed school you can contact Carrie Stevenson or Rick O’Connor at (850) 475-5230; or Chris Verlinde at (850) 623-3868.

A relaxing spot at Camp Beckwith on Weeks Bay. Photo: Camp Beckwith

A relaxing spot at Camp Beckwith on Weeks Bay.
Photo: Camp Beckwith

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Author: Rick O’Connor – roc1@ufl.edu

Sea Grant Extension Agent in Escambia County

Rick O’Connor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/02/05/panhandle-outdoors-live-watershed-school-weeks-bay-national-estuarine-research-reserve/

“Panhandle Outdoors LIVE!” schedule for 2016 announced

“Panhandle Outdoors LIVE!” schedule for 2016 announced

The Florida Legislature has just convened for the 2016 session, and news from the capitol is already announcing a sweeping water bill on the fast-track to passage. Supporters are quoted as saying it would provide increased protection for certain key water resources in the State such as springs and the Everglades; opponents are quoted as saying that while it doesn’t undo current protections, neither does it go far enough to assure sustainable protection of water resources for Florida’s future.

Thus it seems our legislators and lobbyists are celebrating something that’s a little better than what we’ve got now, but isn’t good enough to get the job done. That doesn’t sound very reassuring. We need a realistic blueprint for how Florida’s ever-expanding population and robust agricultural industry that produces our food can continue to use Florida’s water resources without using them up. The only way that’s going to happen is for citizens concerned about their grandchildren’s future in Florida to become the voices that legislators ignore at the peril of their political future.

So how do you know what to think, and what to say, about the state of water resources where you live – in the Panhandle? Do you understand their current status and vulnerabilities? Threats to their near-term viability? Prospects for their long-term sustainability, complicated as they are by projections of amplified climate variability?

“Panhandle Outdoors LIVE!” is stepping it up a notch for 2016, to help you get a handle on these “need to know” issues that affect future sustainability. University of Florida Extension’s acclaimed “Panhandle Outdoors LIVE!” mode of exploring signature water resources with knowledgeable guides is not going away; it’s being expanded into “water school” events in 2016. We are adding expert presentations and discussion to the on-water, on-trail immersion learning adventures you’ve come to love.

Daily river cruises on the Wakulla River are a great way to see manatees and other unique wildlife. Photo: L. Scott Jackson

Daily river cruises on the Wakulla River are a great way to see manatees and other unique wildlife.
Photo: L. Scott Jackson

This year we’ll study four Panhandle water resources of regional significance – the Wakulla Springshed, St. Joe Bay, the Econfina Watershed, and Weeks Bay. Two are freshwater streams and their watersheds; two are bays. Two are in the eastern Panhandle; two are in the west (one even in Alabama). Two are being offered in the spring, the other two in the fall.

First up is the Panhandle Outdoors LIVE! – Wakulla Springshed School on March 1-2. It will base out of the magnificent “Old Florida” Wakulla Springs Lodge south of Tallahassee, and feature field trips to Leon Sinks Geological Area, Cherokee Sink and the Wakulla River – concluding with an optional paddle downriver from Wakulla Springs through a transition of ecosystems to historic Fort San Marcos de Apalachee, where the Wakulla joins the St. Marks River.

Next up, on April 4-5, is Panhandle Outdoors LIVE! – Weeks Bay Watershed School that will base out of the Episcopal Beckwith Camp and Retreat Center on Weeks Bay in Fairhope (Baldwin County) Alabama. This second watershed school will focus on the Weeks Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, and feature a demonstration of oyster farming and a kayak paddle trip.

 

For more detailed information, and to register, for the Wakulla Springshed School visit – http://pol-2016-wakulla-springshed.eventbrite.com

For more information on the April overnight school to Weeks Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve contact Rick O’Connor at roc1@ufl.edu

For more information on the August day school on the Ecofina River contact Laura Tiu at lgtiu@ufl.edu

For more information on the September overnight school to St. Joe Bay contact Erik Lovestrand at elovestrand@ufl.edu

 

 

 

 

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Author: sheftall – sheftall@ufl.edu

Wiliam (Will) Sheftall is the Natural Resources Extension Agent for Leon County

sheftall

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/01/19/panhandle-outdoors-live-schedule-for-2016-announced/

Panhandle Outdoors LIVE! Hikes the Aucilla Sinks Trail

Panhandle Outdoors LIVE! Hikes the Aucilla Sinks Trail

Hernando de Soto and his party crossed the Aucilla River sometime in October of 1539 and celebrated Christmas in what is now Tallahassee. Many things in Florida have changed since de Soto passed this way, but when the 2015 Panhandle Outdoors LIVE! tour hiked the Aucilla Sinks portion of the Florida Trail this September, many things had not.

Panhandle residents explore the area of Aucilla Sinks with local guide David Ward. Photo: Jed Dillard

Panhandle residents explore the area of Aucilla Sinks with local guide David Ward.
Photo: Jed Dillard

Yes, the trail is maintained and marked by the Apalachee chapter of the Florida Trail Associations and there are bridges in spots, but the blood sucking bugs that bedeviled deSoto haven’t dissipated. More importantly, the spectacular and distinctive area provides a relatively easy hike that reveals the connections between geology and hydrology in an area with little disturbance by the settlers who followed the first Europeans into North Florida.

Hikers got up close and personal views of the Karst topography found in North Florida. This topography occurs as the tannic rivers and runoff dissolve the underlying limestone on their way to the aquifer. These connections and voids in the bedrock allow the Aucilla River to “come and go” above and below ground as it moves to the Gulf of Mexico as do all rivers in the Suwannee River Water Management District other than the Suwannee.

Native Jefferson county guide, David Ward pointed out the contrast between tannic water in the river channel and the clear water in caves near the river. “In those caves the water is crystal clear. You are looking at the water of the aquifer itself.”

Leon County agent Will Sheftall seized the opportunity to drive home how vulnerable Floridians are to ground water pollution and its effects on our water supply. “Here there’s little distance between the surface and the ground water. In these sandy soils, water moves quickly from the surface to the aquifer. Whatever is in that water can easily get into our ground water. Our personal activities and our public policies need to reflect that to ensure the future of Florida’s water quality.”

As we reached a slightly elevated area, Ward pointed out a longleaf pine/wiregrass community restored by reinstituting controlled burning. The open vegetation contrasts with the non-fire resistant species such as parsley hawthorn in wetter areas usually untouched by fire. “These pine savannahs were widespread when the Europeans arrived,” Ward noted. “Over my lifetime in these woods, I’ve seen appropriate management bring back these conditions closer to what we know it was like when the Europeans arrived.”

One of the many locations where the Aucilla River "rises from the limestone caverns beneath the earth. Photo: Jed Dillard

One of the many locations where the Aucilla River “rises from the limestone caverns beneath the earth.
Photo: Jed Dillard

Information on this section of the Florida Trail is available from the Apalachee Chapter of the Florida Trail Association, the Suwannee River Water Management District and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Humidity never went below 80 percent during our late morning, early afternoon trip. November will likely provide less buggy and surely less muggy conditions. If you’d like to learn about this area from the comfort of your recliner or need some extra encouragement to strike out on the walk, check out this program previously broadcast by WFSU TV. http://wfsu.org/dimensions/viewvideo.php?num=184 Either way, you’ll know more about Florida’s spectacular natural world.

 

AUTHOR:   Jed Dillard; Livestock and Forges Extension Agent; Jefferson County

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Author: Rick O’Connor – roc1@ufl.edu

Sea Grant Extension Agent in Escambia County

Rick O’Connor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/11/06/panhandle-outdoors-live-hikes-the-aucilla-sinks-trail/

Panhandle Outdoors LIVE – Aucilla River Sinks Hike

A portion of the Aucilla River flows through a landscape of dramatic and unusual geologic formations. Join us for this tour to see an amazing sequence of sinks and river rises, created as the river alternately disappears into the underlying karst and resurfaces. Fringed with moss-draped trees and native palms, the sinks are pools of black water easily viewed by walking the surrounding embankments along a 4.5 mile-segment of the Florida National Scenic Trail.

Your guides will cover the human history of this wildlife-rich Aucilla River landscape, which extends back 12,000 years to the Pleistocene epoc when mastodons, saber-tooth tigers and other large mammals roamed a landscape that resembled the African savannahs of today. The 1983 unearthing of a 12,000-year old mastodon tusk exhibiting cut marks— evidence of slaughter by humans — provides some of the earliest known evidence of man on this continent.

When: Wednesday, September 30th 2015   ●   10:00 am – 4:00 pm EDT

Where: meet at JR’s Aucilla River Store, 23485 US 98, Lamont, FL 32336 (east of the Aucilla River bridge, the boundary between Jefferson and Taylor counties)

Bring: comfortable hiking boots/shoes, weather-appropriate clothing, hiking stick or trekking pole, water bottle, bug spray, day pack; lunch prepared by Tupelo’s Bakery in Monticello will be provided

Cost: $ 25.00 per adult

Register at: http://uf-extension-pol-2015-aucilla-sinks-hike.eventbrite.com

 

Space is limited.

Please feel free to share this announcement and attached flyer with those you know who may be interested. And we hope you can join us for this trip if you’ve never seen this beautiful, mysterious place.

 

Will Sheftall, for Extension Natural Resource Agents in the Panhandle

sheftall@ufl.edu

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Author: Rick O’Connor – roc1@ufl.edu

Sea Grant Extension Agent in Escambia County

Rick O’Connor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/09/21/panhandle-outdoors-live-aucilla-river-sinks-hike/

Panhandle Outdoors LIVE offers Aucilla River Sinks Tour September 30

3759_55_AucillaFT_06LizS

Registration to hike the Aucilla River Sinks with your Extension Natural Resource Agents is now open to participants in previous Panhandle Outdoors LIVE! field tours. We hope you will join us for this 4.5-mile interpretive hike through one of the Panhandle’s most amazing karst landscapes and culturally significant places – home to the First Floridians!

A portion of the Aucilla River flows through a landscape of dramatic and unusual geologic formations. Join us for this tour to see an amazing sequence of sinks and river rises, created as the river alternately disappears into the underlying karst and resurfaces. Fringed with moss-draped trees and native palms, the sinks are pools of black water easily viewed by walking the surrounding embankments along a 4.5 mile-segment of the Florida National Scenic Trail.

Your guides will cover the human history of this wildlife-rich Aucilla River landscape, which extends back 12,000 years to the Pleistocene epoch when mastodons, saber-tooth tigers and other large mammals roamed a landscape that resembled the African savannas of today. The 1983 unearthing of a 12,000-year old mastodon tusk exhibiting cut marks— evidence of slaughter by humans — provides some of the earliest known evidence of man on this continent.

When: Wednesday, September 30th 2015 ● 10:00 am – 4:00 pm EDT

Where: meet at JR’s Aucilla River Store, 23485 US 98, Lamont, FL 32336 (east of the Aucilla River bridge, the boundary between Jefferson and Taylor counties)

Cost: $ 25.00 per adult

Click HERE to register.

Space is limited.

Please feel free to share this announcement and attached flyer with those you know who may be interested. And we hope you can join us for this trip if you’ve never seen this beautiful, mysterious place.

If you need more information, contact Will Sheftall at sheftall@ufl.edu

 

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Author: Libbie Johnson – libbiej@ufl.edu

Agriculture agent at UF IFAS Escambia County Extension.
http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/

Libbie Johnson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/09/19/panhandle-outdoors-live-offers-aucilla-river-sinks-tour-september-30/

4-H U Live Streaming Tonight!

Print4-H University will be streaming live for your viewing pleasure at http://florida4h.org/live/:

Tune in to see the impact UF IFAS Extension 4-H has on Florida’s youth. Don’t miss the awards banquet tonight at 6PM Eastern/5PM Central.  During tonight’s program, you can see 4-Hers accept scholarships, watch the newly elected state officers inducted, and also see distinguished 4-H volunteers and stakeholders inducted into the Florida 4-H Hall of Fame!  Two volunteers from the Florida Panhandle will be inducted tonight- Barry Hoffman from Leon County 4-H and Terry Stout from Okaloosa County 4-H.  Both men have been volunteers at the club, county, district and state levels.  They serve on both the Area A Horse Advisory Committee and the State 4-H Horse Advisory Committee and have supported the Florida 4-H Program for more than 20 years!

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Author: Heather Kent – hckent@ufl.edu

Heather Kent is the Regional Specialized 4-H Agent in the Northwest Extension District.

Heather Kent

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/07/30/4-h-u-live-streaming-tonight/

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