Tag Archive: Native

Four Must-Have Native Perennials for Summer!

Four Must-Have Native Perennials for Summer!

Let’s be honest with each other and have a moment of transparency, one gardener to another. Even though we are plant people, most of us get a lot less enthusiastic once the mercury explodes over 90 degrees each June. All the things that were fun in the spring (watering our favorite fickle plants, deadheading spent flowers, staking, tying, fertilizing, the list goes on) have ceased to be fun.  At this point, like a baby bird pushed out of the nest, the plants in our yards have to either fly or die.  Fortunately, if we select the correct, tough-as-nails plants to start with, our gardens do not have to decline when we retreat into the air conditioning!  The following are four of my favorite ironclad native perennials that will reward you with color, texture, and overall excellent performance all summer and ask very little in return!

Black-Eyed Susan ‘Goldsturm’ (Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivanti ‘Goldsturm’)

There is no more reliable plant in the garden than plain old Black-Eyed Susan. This beauty delivers yellow-gold flowers with its namesake black, cone-like centers perpetually from May to frost in the Panhandle and returns like clockwork each spring to do it all over again! While not exactly native, the 1937 selection ‘Goldsturm’ is still easily the most popular Rudbeckia eighty years later, with good reason.  ‘Goldsturm’ improves upon the native Rudbeckias in almost every way.  It is a more compact plant, forming a spreading mass of flowers about two feet in height, sports larger, showier flowers than the species, and flaunts lustrous dark green foliage.  If low-maintenance, raw flower power is what you are after, Black-Eyed Susan ‘Goldsturm’ is right for you!

If the landscape calls for a plant with flowers hotter than the July sun, Scarlet Sage is hard to beat! This tough, prolific perennial boasts fire engine red, tubular-shaped flowers throughout the warm season in Northwest Florida and is one of the very best attractors of a host of pollinators including butterflies and hummingbirds. Growing this native couldn’t be easier, it is not picky about soil type and texture so long as it doesn’t stay waterlogged, it requires little to no supplemental fertilizer or water, and will thrive in full sun or partial shade.  A word of warning before planting Scarlet Sage however, be aware that the plant will self-sow prolifically, potentially appearing in unwanted places and becoming a nuisance.  Though with a plant this undemanding and pretty, I do not mind one bit if it decides to ramble through the landscape.

Scarlet Sage (Salvia coccinea)

Carolina Petunia (Ruellia caroliniensis) (note: Not to be confused with Mexican Petunia (Ruellia simplex), which, despite its popularity, is an invasive weed and should not be planted)

For those of you that lament hot weather because it means the decline of the showy annual petunias sold by the thousands at big box stores across the South, there is a summer solution for you! Carolina Petunia is a compact (growing to 24” in height), hardy plant whose many outstanding ornamental qualities, including soft purple flowers produced in profusion, make it a great addition to virtually any garden border.  It is not picky regarding soil and while flowering is best in full sun, it grows just fine in the dappled shade of pines or other taller perennials and shrubs.  Like Scarlet Sage, Carolina Petunia will seed around in the landscape but is easily managed and never wears out its welcome.

Dwarf Fakahatchee Grass (Tripsacum floridanum)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ornamental grasses have gained in popularity over the last few years and with good reason! Ornamental grasses tend to be drought tolerant, laugh at the summer sun, and require little maintenance.  However, many popular ornamental grass species like Miscanthus, Muhlenbergia, Pennisetum, and others tend to grow too large for most gardens and end up being replaced a few years later.  Dwarf Fakahatchee fits this niche perfectly, with its emerald green leaf blades only growing 2-3’ in height and width.  It is also more adaptable than most ornamental grass species as it will thrive in sun or partial shade and is tolerant of both wet and dry sites!  While it lacks the colorful flower panicles of Muhly Grass or Miscanthus, Dwarf Fakahatchee does possess interesting brown flower stalks and seed heads as well!

All of these awesome low-maintenance, native perennial selections can be purchased at member nurseries of FANN (Florida Association of Native Nurseries) or local independent garden centers. As always, if you have any questions about this or other horticultural topics, contact your local UF/IFAS County Extension Office.

 

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Author: Daniel J. Leonard – d.leonard@ufl.edu

Horticulture Agent, Walton County

Daniel J. Leonard

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/07/05/four-must-have-native-perennials-for-summer/

A Florida Native; Tape Grass

A Florida Native; Tape Grass

Article by Gadsden County Extension Agent

DJ Zadarreyal

 

Vallisneria americana, also known as tape grass or eel grass, is a common native aquatic weed in the state of Florida. Tape grass has tall, grass-like leaves that are a light green in coloration and rise vertically from the crown to the top of the water. Once the leaves reach the top of the water, they casually float along the surface.

Common tape grass Vallisneria americana.
Photo: UF IFAS

The technique of propagation is by runners. These runners grow out from the crown along the sand and new plants arise from the end of them. There are separate male and female plants, although they grow on the same plant. The female flowers are on lengthy stems, which reach to the surface. However, the male flowers are loosely attached at the base of the leaves. When released, the male flowers float to the surface where they move alongside the female flowers to fertilize them.

 

A good way to distinguish tape grass from other weeds is to observe the leaves and the tips. Tape grass have round leaf tips while many other weeds have pointed leaf tips. In addition, tape grass is a submerged weed that possesses long, ribbon like leaves.

 

There are several uses for tape grass. Restoration of the pond floor is a useful purpose. One of the benefits of tape grass is that they are great oxygenators. Tape grass is also a common home based aquarium plant. They provide an eye-catching scene that fish and humans enjoy.

 

 

Source:

Guide of Tropical Fish, Everything You Need to Know About Tropical Fish

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Author: Rick O’Connor – roc1@ufl.edu

Sea Grant Extension Agent in Escambia County

Rick O’Connor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/04/14/a-florida-native-tape-grass/

Native Shrub Option for Sandy Soils

Native Shrub Option for Sandy Soils

We often talk about sandy, nutrient poor soil in Florida and how difficult it is for growing many favorite landscape plants. Gardeners may spend considerable time and money amending soils with organic matter to improve quality.

The low maintenance approach is to embrace your sandy soil and consider plants that thrive in sandy, well-drained soil. One very attractive native shrub that actually prefers this type of soil is false rosemary, Conrandina canescens.

False rosemary is a member of the mint family that is well adapted to drier, sandy soils. It can be found in many coastal communities growing in natural areas.  It is easily recognized in the spring and early summer by light purple blooms.  Considered a small shrub or groundcover, False rosemary needs full sun. One plant can easily spread out to 4-5 feet in diameter with a height of 2-3 feet.

False rosemary is an attractive native plant for Gulf Coast landscapes. Photo by Beth Bolles, UF Escambia County Extension

False rosemary does have aromatic foliage and is attractive to bees. It is a very low maintenance plant once established and its few issues tend to be related to soils with too much moisture and plants being shaded after establishment.  New seedlings will emerge around the main plant when growing conditions are right.  If you want to try this native plant in your landscape, talk to a local nursery.

False rosemary flowers are attractive to pollinators. Photo by Beth Bolles, UF Escambia County Extension

 

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Author: Beth Bolles – bbolles@ufl.edu

Horticulture Agent, Escambia County

Beth Bolles

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/03/30/native-shrub-option-for-sandy-soils/

Consider a Native Evergreen This Christmas

Consider a Native Evergreen This Christmas

eastern-redcedarThroughout history the evergreen tree has been a symbol of life. “Not only green when summer’s here, but also when cedar%20waxwing%20b57-13-103_vit’s cold and dreary” as the Christmas carol “O Tannenbaum” says.  While supporting the cut Christmas tree industry does create jobs and puts money into local economics, every few years consider adding to the urban forest by purchasing a living tree.  Native evergreen trees such as Redcedar make a nice Christmas tree that can be planted following the holidays.  The dense growth and attractive foliage make Redcedar a favorite for windbreaks, screens and wildlife cover.  The heavy berry production provides a favorite food source for migrating Cedar Waxwing birds.  Its highsouthern-redcedar salt-tolerance makes it ideal for coastal locations.  Their natural pyramidal-shape creates the traditional Christmas tree form, but can be easily pruned as a street tree.  Two species, Juniperus virginiana and Juniperus silicicola are native to Northwest Florida.  Many botanists do not separate the two, but as they mature, Juniperus silicicola takes on a softer, more informal look.  When planning for using a live Christmas tree there are a few things to consider.  The tree needs sunlight, so restrict its inside time to less than a week.  Make sure there is a catch basin for water under the tree, but never allow water to remain in the tray and don’t add fertilizer.  Locate your tree in the coolest part of the room and away from heating ducts and fireplaces. After Christmas, install the Redcedar in an open, sunny part of the yard.  After a few years you will be able to admire the living fence with all the wonderful memories of many years of holiday celebrations. Don’t forget to watch for the Cedar Waxwings.

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Author: Sheila Dunning – sdunning@ufl.edu


http://okaloosa.ifas.ufl.edu

Sheila Dunning

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/12/06/consider-a-native-evergreen-this-christmas/

Saltbush – A Late Blooming Native Shrub

Saltbush – A Late Blooming Native Shrub

 

Female saltbush plant in bloom. Credit: Niels Proctor

Female saltbush plant in bloom. Credit: Niels Proctor, hort.ifas.ufl.edu

If you have noticed bursts of white-flowered shrubs along roadsides, trails, and other natural areas the last couple of weeks, there’s a good chance that it was saltbush (Baccharis halimifolia). Saltbush is a native shrub in the sunflower or daisy family (Asteraceae) that can be found throughout the Coastal Plain. It often grows along the edges of freshwater and brackish water wetlands, but also seems happy in upland sites as well. It prefers sunny sites and can reach a height of ten to fifteen feet. There are separate female and male plants of this species, with females having the showy, white blooms while males are somewhat plain.

While it can be quite common in natural areas, it is rarely seen in the home landscape. Although saltbush is a somewhat leggy shrub, its home landscape value comes from the fact that it blooms at a time when most other plants are done blooming or are going into dormancy. In addition to its show of white flowers at a time when many other landscape plants are becoming drab, saltbush is also an important nectar source for migrating monarch butterflies. It is also tolerant of salt spray, so makes a good addition to the landscape in coastal areas.

Leaves and seed of saltbush. Credit: Niels Proctor

Leaves and seed of saltbush. Credit: Niels Proctor, hort.ifas.ufl.edu

Saltbush may be hard to find in the retail nursery trade, but can often be sourced from nurseries that specialize in native plants or ecosystem restoration plantings. There are male and female plants, so when purchasing, you may want to see it in bloom to verify that you picked a female. If you know someone with saltbush on their property, you can start some on your own by collecting seed or propagating it through soft or hardwood cuttings.

If you would like to try out an underused, native shrub that provides great late fall color and helps feed monarch butterflies for their journey home, plant a saltbush in your landscape. You may have neighbors asking about that unusual, but pretty, shrub.

 

More information can be found at Baccharis halimifolia Salt Bush, Groundsel Bush

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Author: Mark Tancig – tancig00@ufl.edu

Mark Tancig

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/11/16/saltbush-a-late-blooming-native-shrub/

Saltbush–a Native Beauty, of Sorts

Saltbush–a Native Beauty, of Sorts

Saltbush seed in "bloom" stands out in a saltmarsh dominated by black needlerush. Photo credit: Zach Schang, FDEP

Saltbush seed in “bloom” stands out in a salt marsh dominated by black needlerush. Photo credit: Zach Schang, FDEP

In the spring and summer, no one notices the little green shrub hidden among wax myrtle and marsh elder at the edge of the salt marsh. However, if I’m leading a group of students or a Master Naturalist class through the same area in the fall, it’s the first plant people ask about. The saltbush or groundsel tree (Baccharis halmifolia) blooms dramatically in late September and October, with feathery, dandelion-like white “flowers” on female plants. These seeds are dispersed far and wide by the wind. Male plants typically grow side-by-side with females, and produce yellowish, tubular blooms at the same time. Characterized as both a large shrub and a small tree, the saltbush typically branches from multiple trunks and ranges in height from 2-10 feet. The leaves are rough to the touch and slightly succulent, enabling the plant to hold onto moisture in the sandy, hot environments on the  uphill edges of wetlands in which it thrives.

The leaf of Baccharis angustifolia is narrower than B. halmifolia. Both are succulent, enabling the plants to hold on to moisture in a salty environment. Photo courtesy Shirley Denton, Florida Plant Atlas.

The leaf of Baccharis angustifolia is narrower than B. halmifolia. Both are succulent, enabling the plants to hold on to moisture in a salty environment. Photo courtesy Shirley Denton, Florida Plant Atlas.

The leaf of Baccharis halmifolia is lobed and wider than B. angustifolia is narrower. Both are succulent, enabling the plants to hold on to moisture in a salty environment. Photo courtesy Forestry Images.

The leaf of Baccharis halmifolia is lobed and wider than B. angustifolia is narrower. Both are succulent, enabling the plants to hold on to moisture in a salty environment. Photo courtesy Forestry Images.

The plant is often confused with its near relative, false willow (Baccharis angustifolia), which is typically co-located with saltbush in coastal wetlands. It also blooms white in the fall, but can be differentiated by its slender, almost needle-like (but also succulent) leaves.

Saltbush is not typically used in the home landscape, as some people are allergic and the seeds are poisonous if ingested. Properly planted, however, it is a perfect addition to a butterfly garden because the male plants’ fall flowers provide nectar to numerous butterfly species, including the monarch. Another ideal location for saltbush would be a rain garden or the edges of a stormwater pond. Coastal property owners on the bay or Gulf would find it an excellent addition due to its tolerance of the year-round salt spray. The species is very hardy–tolerant of both wet and dry soils–along with a variety of soil pH levels. Plant saltbush in full sun with at least 3-5 feet between young plants.

For additional information on the characteristics of saltbush, please see the UF publication, Baccharis halmifolia Saltbush, Groundsel Bush and check out this entertaining video from our Lee County colleague, Stephen Brown, as he immerses himself in a stand of saltbush.

 

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Author: Carrie Stevenson – ctsteven@ufl.edu

Coastal Sustainability Agent, Escambia County Extension

Carrie Stevenson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/09/17/saltbush-a-native-beauty-of-sorts/

An Early Study Shows the Invasion of the Asian Tiger Shrimp Could Have an Impact on Native Shrimp

An Early Study Shows the Invasion of the Asian Tiger Shrimp Could Have an Impact on Native Shrimp

The Asian Tiger Shrimp (Penaeus monodon) have been reported across the northern Gulf of Mexico for several years now but unlike Cogon grass, Chinese tallow, and Lionfish they have not really made the press.  We know they are there, but captures in shrimp trawls seem to be infrequent… it just does not look like a serious problem.

The Asian Tiger Shrimp can reach lengths of 12"

The Asian Tiger Shrimp can reach lengths of 12″

But now there is a study being conducted by Dr. Jennifer Hill (Louisiana Tech University) that sheds a little light on the impacts of this new invasive species. Working out of Dauphin Island Sea Lab, and funded by Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant, her study is looking at the interactions between the tiger shrimp and our native species – the white and brown shrimp.

 

Tiger Shrimp as Predators

Dr. Hill has discovered that tiger shrimp do not prefer salt marshes, as our native species do. They are apparently too large, ranging between 8 and 10 inches – some as large as 14 inches, and prefer more open environments.  Tiger shrimp may prefer seagrass beds, another haunt for local shrimp, but she is not sure at the moment.  She has noticed that when tiger shrimp are around the native shrimp move towards structure.  This is to avoid predation by tiger shrimp, which do try and catch them – but they are not very good at it.  Her study indicates that 80-90% of the native shrimp survive such attacks, but forcing the natives towards structure could impact the catch by our shrimpers.

 

Tiger Shrimp as Prey

Preferring open environments leaves tiger shrimp at a higher risk of predation. One thought is that their large size and dark color may not be recognized as a shrimp by local predators.  One species that has shown interest in them are redfish.  Dr. Hill has found that redfish will not hesitate to go after them, and may actually prefer them over white shrimp, but – because of the size of the tiger shrimp – it must be a large redfish.

Five tiger shrimp captured by shrimpers in Pensacola Bay.

Five tiger shrimp captured by shrimpers in Pensacola Bay.

Shrimpers in Alabama and Mississippi are currently selling the tiger shrimp they capture to Dr. Hill for her studies. She found that very few were captured in 2014, possibly due to the cold winter that year, but had plenty submitted in 2015.  The mild winter of 2016 may produce a large number this summer.  If you are shrimper in the Pensacola area, and interested in selling live tiger shrimp at $ 30 each, contact Dr. Hill at (251) 861-2141 ext. 2179.

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Author: Rick O’Connor – roc1@ufl.edu

Sea Grant Extension Agent in Escambia County

Rick O’Connor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/09/03/an-early-study-shows-the-invasion-of-the-asian-tiger-shrimp-could-have-an-impact-on-native-shrimp/

Go Native: Rainlilies!

Go Native: Rainlilies!

Florida is home to many gorgeous and desirable native plant species. One to consider for your landscape is the rainlily, Zephyranthes and Habranthus spp. They are easy to care for and are bothered by few pests.

Cuban rainlily, Zephyranthes rosea. Photo: John Ruter, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org

Cuban rainlily, Zephyranthes rosea. Photo: John Ruter, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org

As the name implies, rainlilies do thrive when getting consistent rain or watering. A good soaking rain event will result in blooms within a few days. This love for moisture makes them perfect for rain gardens.

Atamasco rainlily, Zephyranthes atamasco. Photo: Jerry A. Payne, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org.

Atamasco rainlily, Zephyranthes atamasco. Photo: Jerry A. Payne, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org.

Plant the bulbs or transplants in full sun to part shade in moist but well-drained fertile soil. Let them be for many years in order to form large impressive clumps and that is when they flower the best. You can also separate the clumps every few years to colonize new areas and pass along to others. After the plants bloom they will reliably set seed that you can collect to start rainlilies in other parts of your garden. However, the seeds are viable for only a short time so you should plant them immediately.

For sources of plant material, try your local nursery that tends to carry native plants or through online sources.

For more information:

Rainlily, Zephyranthes and Habranthus spp.: Low Maintenance Flowering Bulbs for Florida Gardens

 

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Author: Mary Derrick – mderrick@ufl.edu

Residential Horticulture Extension Agent for Santa Rosa County

Mary Derrick

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/09/02/go-native-rainlilies/

Native Plants and Wildlife

Native Plants and Wildlife

According to the Atlas of Florida Vascular Plants, there are more than 4,200 plant species naturally occurring in the state.  Nearly 3,000 are considered native.  The Florida Native Plant Society (FNPS) defines native plants as “those species occurring within the state boundaries prior to European contact, according to the best available scientific and historical documentation.”  In other words, the plants that grew in natural habitats that existed prior to development.Crossvine

Native plants evolved in their own ecological niches. They are suited to the local climate and can survive without fertilization, irrigation or cold protection.  Because a single native plant species usually does not dominate an area, there is biodiversity.  Native plants and wildlife evolved together in communities, so they complement each other’s needs.  Florida ranks 7th among all 50 states in biodiversity for number of species of vertebrates and plants.  Deer browse on native vines like Crossvine (Bignonia capreolata), Trumpet Creeper (Campsis radicans), Yellow Jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) and Trumpet Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens).   The seeds and berries of Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia fulgida), Flowering Dogwood (Cornus florida) and Dahoon holly (Ilex cassine) provide vital food for songbirds, both local and migratory.  Saw palmetto (Serenoa repens) provides cover for numerous birds and small mammals, as well as, reptiles.saw-palmetto-palm-tree-picture

Non-native plants become “naturalized” if they establish self-sustaining populations. Nearly one-third of the plants currently growing wild in Florida are not native.  While these plant species from other parts of the world may provide some of the resources needed by native wildlife, it comes at a cost to the habitat.  These exotic plants can become “invasive”, meaning they displace native plants and change the diverse population into a monoculture of one species.  Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense), Popcorn trees (Triadica sebifera) and Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica) have changed the landscape of Florida over the past decade.  While Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) and Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) have changed water flow in many rivers and lakes.  These invasive species cost millions of taxpayer dollars to control.waterhyacinth4

By choosing to use native plants and removing non-native invasive plants, individuals can reduce the disruptions to natural areas. For more information one specific native plants that benefit wildlife go to: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/uw384

It learn which plants are invasive go to: http://www.fleppc.org/list/2015FLEPPCLIST-LARGEFORMAT-FINAL.pdf

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Author: Sheila Dunning – sdunning@ufl.edu


http://okaloosa.ifas.ufl.edu

Sheila Dunning

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/06/04/native-plants-and-wildlife/

Discover the Beauty and Role of Native Aquatic Plants – in Your Own Pond

A stand of purple wetland plants called "False Dragon Heads (Physostegia spp.). Photo by Judy Biss

A stand of purple flowers called “False Dragon-Heads (Physostegia spp.) growing along the St. Marks River. They are behind a stand of pickerelweed (Pontederia cordata) that has not yet bloomed.  Photo by Judy Biss

This is the time of year when gardens burst forth with lush green growth and colorful flowers.  With a little planning and management, your backyard pond can also put on the same show each year and fight unwanted pond weeds at the same time!

Fish and farm ponds are abundant in the Florida panhandle.  Most are two acres or less and are used for producing catfish, bass, and bream; for recreation and wildlife viewing; for fishing and swimming; and for irrigation and livestock watering.  Ponds play an important role in various aspects of agricultural production and rural life, and for that reason, maintaining their ecological health is critical to their many uses.

Managing aquatic plants is one important component of pond ownership.  If you are a pond owner, you have probably seen and read many articles related to controlling and removing aquatic weeds.  Just as in terrestrial gardens, there are a number of non-native (and sometimes native) plants that can become quite weedy and problematic in and around your pond.  Hydrilla, water hyacinth, torpedograss, Chinese tallow, alligator weed, and the tiny water spangles (common Salvinia) are just a few examples that plague our waterways and shorelines.  But, controlling and removing weeds is only part of the bigger picture of pond management.  Planting native wetland plants is another ecologically important and aesthetically enriching management tool as well.

By establishing beds of healthy native plants, you are also fighting against weedy non-native invasive plants through competition for space.  Some other benefits of native aquatic plants are they act as a barrier, filtering fertilizers such as nitrogen and phosphorus from runoff, and they help control erosion.  Also, because native plants are adapted to our local environments, they are generally easy to grow, and most require little or no extra water or fertilizer.

Below are a few guidelines to follow if you are considering the use of native aquatic plants in your pond.

Know Your Plants:

Depending on the type, aquatic plants generally grow in three forms.  Emerged, like maidencane or bulrush, submerged like coontail and southern naiad, and floating, like the tiny free floating duckweed, and spatterdock and fragrant water lily which are rooted with floating leaves and flowers at the water’s surface. There are many good UF/IFAS publications and online resources for aquatic plant identification.  Some are listed at the end of this article.

Plan Ahead:

Some questions to ask are, what is the primary use of your pond?  Is it wildlife viewing, swimming, fishing, irrigation, etc.?  The answers to these questions will help you determine how much of your pond and shoreline will be planted, and what types of plants to use.  For example, if you use your pond for fishing and irrigation, you should leave some areas of the shore unplanted and mowed to allow for access, and you should not plant submerged plants that may clog irrigation intakes.  On the other hand, if your pond is primarily for attracting wildlife, you can plant most of the shoreline including some types of submerged aquatic plants.

Right Plant Right Place:

You may have heard this Florida Friendly Landscaping term before, as it holds true for any garden including aquatic gardens.  Choose plants that grow best in the water depth and planting “shelves” you have in and around your pond.  By “shelf” we are referring to the slope of your shoreline.  Is it a gradual, gentle slope into deeper water, or is it steep and abrupt?  Also, become familiar with seasonal changes in your pond’s water depth, as it may affect the plants you select.

Prepare For Maintenance:

Just like a vegetable garden, your newly planted aquatic plants (especially those that are emerged) will need attention in the first year or so of establishment.  Remove dead plants and weed out unwanted plants.

Where to Purchase the Plants:

For a list of Florida native plant suppliers, visit the Association of Florida Native Nurseries (AFNN) Please Note: collecting wild plants in Florida is subject to various regulations and may require permits!  Visit this website for details on wild collection – Florida Plant Collecting and Transport, Regulations and Permitting, University of Florida Herbarium

Here are some helpful resources used for this article with more detail on establishing aquatic plants around your pond:

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Author: Judy Biss – judy.ludlow@ufl.edu

Judy Ludlow is the Agriculture and Natural Resource Agent in Calhoun County, Florida

Judy Biss

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/04/14/discover-the-beauty-and-role-of-native-aquatic-plants-in-your-own-pond-2/

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