Tag Archive: October

Vegetable Crops Field Day – October 13

Vegetable Crops Field Day – October 13

The 2017 UF/IFAS Vegetable Crops Field Day will provide the latest research information for commercial growers of watermelons, squash, and tomatoes. The event will be held at the North Florida Research and Education Center located at 155 Research Road, in Quincy Florida.

Learn the results of the latest research on…

  • Soil Fumigant Trials

  • Deep Drip Tape Fumigation

  • Deep Core Nematode Sampling Results

  • Cucurbit Disease Trials

  • Bacterial Spot, Bacterial Wilt, & Target Spot Trials

  • Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Trials

Pesticide Applicator CEUs will be provided, along with a sponsored lunch!  This is a free event but we do ask that you RSVP by calling 850-482-9620 or emailing s.farr@ufl.edu.

PG

Author: Matt Lollar – mlollar@ufl.edu

Matt Lollar is the Jackson County Horticulture Agent. He has 5 years of experience with University of Florida/IFAS Extension and he began his career in Sanford, FL as the Seminole County Horticulture Agent. Matt is originally from Belle Fontaine, AL. He earned his MS and BS degrees in Horticulture Production from Auburn University.

Matt Lollar

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/23/vegetable-crops-field-day-october-13/

Forest Stewardship Tour of Sandhill Farm in Jackson County – October 5

Forest Stewardship Tour of Sandhill Farm in Jackson County – October 5

Sandhill Farm in Jackson County. Credit: Billy Boothe

Sandhill Farm – Property of David and Cindi Stewart

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Meet at the property at 9:00 AM CT – Adjourn after lunch

When Cindi and David Stewart first saw the mosaic of sandhills, swamps, flatwoods and loblolly pine forest making up this 222-acre Jackson County property, they knew they would buy it. Avid hikers from the south-central Florida suburbs, they loved being in the forest. That was 14 years ago, and they have come a long way towards their goal of managing their property for wildlife habitat. After beginning their land management education with the Master Tree Farmer and Master Wildlifer short courses offered by Clemson University and University of Florida IFAS Extension, they sought advice and a Forest Stewardship management plan from the Florida Forest Service and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.
Following some hard work managing underbrush, they planted 50 acres of longleaf pine.  With diverse wildlife habitat as a primary goal, they burn every two years and have some beautiful groundcover plants like wiregrass and blazing star.  In 2006, they were awarded Jackson County Tree Farmers of the Year. Join us for a walking tour of this property.  This will be a relatively short hike on trails.  Please wear appropriate clothing and footwear for the field.
Cost is $ 10 per person, lunch and materials included. Register online at https://fsp-tour100517.eventbrite.com/. You can also reserve a space by contacting UF/IFAS Jackson County Extension at (850) 482-9620, and pay at the event with cash or check payable to University of Florida.  Space is limited so register early. Please share this announcement with others who may be interested.

Use the following link for the printer friendly event flyer with directions and a map for driving to the property:

Sandhill Farm Stewardship Tour

Driving Directions

David and Cindi Stewart’s Sandhills Farm – 357 Pittman Hill Road – Marianna, FL 32448 – (850) 579-8848
From I-10, Marianna:
  • Exit at the western-most Marianna exit (Exit #136), SR 276.
  • Turn left on SR 276 West and go less than 1 mile to CR 167 South (signs to Panama City &Fountain)
  • Turnleft on CR 167 South
  • Travel about 9.8 miles south on CR 167 to Nortek Blvd. (yellow intersection sign indicating Nortek Blvd & second sign for Compass Lakes inthe Hills) – turn left (east) on Nortek Blvd. -Travel east on Nortek Blvd. until the pavement ends –our property begins on your left as the pavement ends.
  • Stay on Nortek Blvd./Hasty Pond Road (the name changes as the pavement ends) for another ½ mile.
  • Turn left (north) at the first intersection onto Pittman Hill Road
  • They have the first real driveway (with a mailbox) on the left, after you pass the pond on the left –less than ½ mile. The house number “357” is on the mailbox. Follow the power poles to the house.

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/22/forest-stewardship-tour-of-sandhill-farm-in-jackson-county-october-5/

Farm Food Safety Workshops – October 5 & 26

Farm Food Safety Workshops – October 5 & 26

Photo by Judy Biss

Two Farm Food Safety Workshops are scheduled for October in the Panhandle.  A Building Your Own Farm’s Food Safety Manual Workshop is scheduled for October 5th in Crestview and a Produce Safety Alliance (PSA) Grower Training is scheduled for October 26 in Marianna.  The PSA Grower Training curriculum is approved by the FDA to meet the requirements of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Produce Safety Rule.

Which Training Should Growers Attend?

  • All fruit and vegetable farms should have a food safety manual.  If you haven’t created a manual yet, then you will learn what needs to go in your manual and develop your own manual at the Building Your Own Farm’s Food Safety Manual Workshop in Crestview.
  • Fruit and vegetable farms that have an annual value of produce sold (based on a three year average) of $ 25,000 (adjusted for inflation) or more are required to attend an FDA approved FSMA training such as the PSA Grower Training offered in Marianna.
  • If both of the above criteria apply to you, then you should attend both trainings.

Benefits of Attending Each Workshop

  • The Building Your Own Farm’s Food Safety Manual Workshop will not only allow you to develop your own Food Safety Manual, but it will also help you prepare for a Food Safety Audit.  You will go home with an electronic copy of you personalized food safety manual, food safety training materials for you employees, and a food safety reference notebook.  This workshop also provides CEUs for pesticide applicators.
  • The PSA Grower Training will cover the requirements of the FSMA produce safety rule. It will also cover key Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) and Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) that are necessary in a farm food safety plan.  You will go home with a FSMA produce safety rule reference notebook and a Certificate of Course Attendance compliant with FSMA requirements.

Cost to Attend Each Workshop and Registration Information

  • The fee for the Building Your Own Farm’s Food Safety Manual Workshop is $ 35 for the first person representing a farm and $ 15 for one additional attendee.  Registration fee includes the training materials, an electronic copy of your personalized manual, lunch, refreshments, and a Certificate of Course Attendance.  Register by calling the Jackson County Extension Office at (850)482-9620 or emailing Sabrina at s.farr@ufl.edu.  (Note: This workshop will be held at the Okaloosa County Extension Office, 3098 Airport Rd., Crestview, FL.)
  • The fee for the PSA Grower Training is $ 95.  For attendees who are members of the Florida Fruit & Vegetable Association (FFVA), a discounted rate of $ 80 is available.  (Not sure if you’re a member?  Contact Sonia Tighe at 321-214-5245 or sonia.tighe@ffva.com).  Registration fee includes the training materials, lunch, refreshments, and a Certificate of Course Attendance that complies with the training requirements of FSMA.  Register online at Online Registration or download the training brochure to register by mail.

If you have any questions pertaining to which training is right for you or other general food safety questions, please feel free to contact Matt Lollar with the Jackson County Extension Office at (850)482-9620 or mlollar@ufl.edu.

 

PG

Author: Matt Lollar – mlollar@ufl.edu

Matt Lollar is the Jackson County Horticulture Agent. He has 5 years of experience with University of Florida/IFAS Extension and he began his career in Sanford, FL as the Seminole County Horticulture Agent. Matt is originally from Belle Fontaine, AL. He earned his MS and BS degrees in Horticulture Production from Auburn University.

Matt Lollar

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/08/farm-food-safety-workshops-october-5-26/

October Florida Cattle Market Price Watch

October Florida Cattle Market Price Watch

Prevatt FL Cattle Market headerprevatt-chart-1-oct-16The August 2017 Feeder Cattle futures contract decreased by $ 4.95/cwt. during October. Based on this futures price decrease, August Feeder Cattle revenues decreased by approximately $ 37.13/hd. ($ 4.95/cwt. * 7.5 cwt.) on a 750-pound feeder steer which amounts to $ 2,475.00 per truckload (50,000 lbs.). The August Feeder Cattle futures contract high, contract low, and price range since September 2016 are $ 128.00, $ 109.90, and $ 18.10/cwt., respectively. The price range of $ 18.10/cwt. on a 750-pound feeder steer totals $ 135.75/hd. and $ 9,050.00 per truckload.

prevatt-chart-2-oct-16

  1. The breakeven price was estimated to be $ 722.10/hd. or $ 131.29/cwt. ($ 722.10/hd. divided by 5.50 cwt.). The breakeven price includes production costs of $ 705/hd. and death loss of $ 17.10/hd.
  2. The price objective was estimated to be $ 872.10/hd. or $ 158.56/cwt. ($ 872.10/hd. divided by 5.50 cwt.). The price objective includes production costs of $ 705/hd., death loss ($ 17.10/hd.), family living withdrawal ($ 100/hd.), and growth capital/retirement ($ 50/hd.).
  3. The expected cash price is equal to the daily August 2017 Feeder Cattle futures closing price plus an expected August 2017 South Florida 550 lb. Feeder Calf Basis of $ 2/cwt.

 

PG

Author: Chris Prevatt – prevacg@ufl.edu

Chris Prevatt

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/11/12/october-florida-cattle-market-price-watch-2/

October Weather Summary and Three Month Outlook

October Weather Summary and Three Month Outlook

Source: National Weather Service estimates for rainfall in the Florida Panhandle.

Source: National Weather Service estimates for rainfall in the Florida Panhandle.

October Summary

October is historically one of the driest months of the year in the Florida Panhandle.  Much of the western portion of the Panhandle, however, was “O-for-October,” with little to no rainfall this year.  Northern Jefferson County did receive more than 3″ of rain (tan) in October, but the majority of the region had less than 0.25″ (light blue) for the month.

oct-2016-fawn-panhandle-rainfallThe University of Florida’s Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN) stations recorded limited rainfall in the month of October as well.  The highest total rainfall in October was recorded at the Monticello Station with only 0.9″, while both the Jay and Carrabelle stations did not record any rainfall for the month at all.  The average for all six stations was only 0.3″, which is more than 3″ below average.  For the year the Monticello station had the highest total with 56.1″ through the first 10 months of 2016, which is almost 5″ above historic average for this location.  The driest location remained Marianna with only 41.1″ for the year, which was 5.6″ below average for that location.  To date, only the Monticello and Quincy stations have recorded above historic average rainfall for the year.

Source: National Drought Monitor

Source: National Drought Monitor

Drought conditions in the Southeast grew even worse in October.  The drought that has been so severe in northern Alabama and Georgia has expanded into the Florida Panhandle.  It has been several years since the Panhandle has been in the moderate drought category of the Drought Monitor.

oct-16-marianna-fawn-summaryTemperatures did moderate some in October, but it was certainly warmer than normal as was forecasted.  Average air temperatures fell 7° from 77° in September to 70° in October, while soil temperatures dipped 5° from 86° down to 76°.  This was 2° warmer for the average air temperature and 5° warmer average soil temperature than last year.

La Niña Watch is Back On

The Climate Prediction Center (CPC) is once again forecasting a La Niña winter.  All summer there has been debate about a potential for a warmer and dryer winter based on the development of a La Niña this coming fall and winter.  In late summer the CPC called off the watch, but conditions in the Pacific Ocean have changed.  The following is their latest forecast:
ENSO-Neutral conditions were observed during September, with negative sea surface temperatures anomalies expanding across the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean by early October. All of the Niño regions cooled considerably during late September and early October.  La Niña is favored to develop (~70% chance) during the Northern Hemisphere fall 2016 and slightly favored to persist (~55% chance) during winter 2016-17.  Climate Prediction Center

Looking Ahead – 3 Month Forecast

climate-prediction-center-nov-16-jan-17-outlookThe outlook for the next three months is not very encouraging for cool-season forage or crop production. The CPC is predicting warmer than average temperatures and well below average rainfall from November though January.  Clearly the forecast images above and the drought forecast below are showing the impact of the anticipated La Niña.

nov-january-17-drought-outlookNot only is the current situation serious but is forecasted to continue into the winter months.  It does not look encouraging for winter grazing, or whea or oat grain production this year.  Livestock producers counting on winter grazing for supplementation may be required to invest in additional purchased hay and by-product feeds, if pastures are already planted.  Producers who have been waiting on rain to plant, may want to return seed and exchange them for supplements.  All indications are that the months ahead will remain drier than normal. Hopefully things will improve in 2017.

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/11/05/october-weather-summary-and-three-month-outlook/

BMP Pasture Walk October 21

BMP Pasture Walk October 21

perennial grass roots grow deep into the soil profile and actually build healthier soils for crop rotation. Photo credit; Doug Mayo

The North Florida Research and Education Center faculty will share the results of BMP Research trials at Conrad Farms and at the Beef Research Unit . Photo credit; Doug Mayo

Make plans to attend an on-farm and research center pasture walk, Friday October 21st from 9:00 am until 12:30 pm Central Time. The tour group will meet at the Beef Research Unit Pavilion north of Marianna and west of Greenwood on Highway 162 (4925 Highway 162, Greenwood, FL).

This half-day, Best Management Practices (BMP) on-farm research tour will feature hay fertilization with coated urea products and biosolids, as well as visiting an alfalfa field to assess the compatibility of bahiagrass and bermudagrass with alfalfa and perennial peanut! We will also discuss forage system economics with Chris Prevatt Regional Livestock Economist. Upon our return to the NFREC, we will continue with visits to mixed grass/legume systems and check out the early plantings of cool-season small grains, including black oats. We will also be identifying any disease and pest issues, along the way. Drs. Jose Dubeux (forage management), Ann Blount (forage breeding), and Cheryl Mackowiak (forage fertility) will be there to answer your questions. Doug Mayo (Jackson County, CED) will introduce our cooperators and provide a brief background on some of the water quality issues that may impact farming and ranching practices in the area.

We hope this event kicks off a regular Panhandle Pasture Walk series spear-headed by Dr. Dubeux. Your participation and feedback will be greatly appreciated and will help us in developing a community of shared interests in forage systems in our region.

After the official event, we plan to re-group at a local eating establishment for a Dutch-Treat lunch to continue discussions. Extension Agents, and livestock producers who would enjoy discussing a mix of research and real-world forage production challenges are invited to attend. To help with logistics, we would greatly appreciate an RSVP by close-of-business, Wednesday, October 19th to Doris Williams at the Jackson County Extension Office 850-482-9620. There is no charge and snacks & water will be provided on the tour.

 

PG

Author: Cheryl Mackowiak – echo13@ufl.edu


http://nfrec.ifas.ufl.edu

Cheryl Mackowiak

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/10/15/bmp-pasture-walk-october-21/

UF/IFAS Experts to Celebrate Animal Agriculture at the Sunbelt Ag Expo October 18-20

UF/IFAS Experts to Celebrate Animal Agriculture at the Sunbelt Ag Expo October 18-20

Panhandle Ag Team members Matt Hersom, Doug Mayo and Mark Mauldin provided information on forages at the UF/IFAS barn at the 2015 Sunbelt Expo.

Panhandle Ag Team members Matt Hersom, Doug Mayo, and Mark Mauldin provided information on forages at the UF/IFAS Barn at the 2015 Sunbelt Expo.

Samantha Grenrock, UF/IFAS Communications Service

University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences faculty will be sharing their expertise on the theme of Florida’s Animal Agriculture at the 39th annual Sunbelt Ag Expo — the largest agricultural expo in the southeast.

About 80,000 people are expected to attend the expo, held October 18 through 20 in Moultrie, Georgia.

“Our experts in UF/IFAS Extension are thrilled to represent our programs, and we are proud to participate in such an important event. It is a great opportunity to meet others who are as passionate about agriculture as we are,” said Nick Place, dean of UF/IFAS Extension.

Visitors come to the expo to learn about the latest agricultural research, technology and marketing tools, according to the expo web site.

At the permanent UF/IFAS building, displays and exhibits will tell the story of Florida’s animal industries, starting with the resources that go into raising animals and ending with the safe preparation of animal proteins. In addition, attendees can hear presentations on livestock forages and poisonous plants by UF/IFAS researchers in the expo’s Beef Barn, or head over to the pond section to learn more about Florida’s fisheries.

Visitors to the UF/IFAS building will also get a chance to sample some “Gator Giveaways,” such as peanuts from the Florida Peanut Growers Association and Florida Orange Juice from Natalie’s Orchid Island Juice Company.

Representatives from the UF College of Agricultural and Life Sciences (CALS) will host a booth where high school students and their families can learn about the wide range of degrees and educational opportunities in the college.

The Sunbelt Ag Expo is held at Spence Field, 4 miles southeast of U.S. 319 (Veteran’s Parkway) on Georgia Highway 133 near Moultrie. Expo hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesday and Wednesday, and 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday. Admission is $ 10 a person per day, or $ 20 for a three-day pass. Children 10 and under, accompanied by a parent get in free.

For more information, visit www.sunbeltexpo.com or download the free 2016 Sunbelt Ag Expo app on your Smartphone.

 

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/10/15/ufifas-experts-to-celebrate-animal-agriculture-at-the-sunbelt-ag-expo-october-18-20/

Gardening for Pollinator Conservation Workshop – October 13

Gardening for Pollinator Conservation Workshop – October 13

Bee Balm CompressedA “Gardening for Pollinator Conservation” Workshop will take place Thursday, October 13, at the UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center (NFREC) in Quincy. Pollinators are important in conserving native plants, ensuring a plentiful food supply, encouraging biodiversity and helping maintain a healthier ecological environment – the so-called “balance of nature.” Come learn how you can conserve and promote pollinators in your own garden, all while beautifying your own little piece of Nature.

As in previous years, nursery vendors will be selling pollinator plants at the Oct. 13 workshop, making it convenient for you to put into practice what you learn at the workshop!  Registration is just $ 15 per person and includes lunch, refreshments, and handouts.

Check out the workshop details and register at: https://gardeningforpollinatorconservation.eventbrite.com/

What: Gardening for Pollinator Conservation

When: Thursday, October 13, 8:30 am to 5:00 pm EDT

Where: University of Florida/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center, 155 Research Road, Quincy, FL. Located just north of I-10 Exit 181, 3 miles south of Quincy, off Pat Thomas Highway, SR 267.

Cost: $ 15 per person (includes lunch, refreshments and handouts)

Registration: https://gardeningforpollinatorconservation.eventbrite.com

For more information, contact: Gary Knox, gwknox@ufl.edu; 850.875.7105

For a printable Flyer click here: Gardening for Pollinators Workshop

Our workshop builds on previous successful pollinator workshops held at Leon County Extension last year and in Marianna in 2012. This workshop was developed as a collaboration of county faculty from several extension offices with folks from the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission, as well as UF/IFAS NFREC. Sponsors helping defray costs include the Florida Native Plant Society – Magnolia Chapter, Gardening Friends of the Big Bend, Inc., Mail-Order Natives, and University of Florida/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center.

We look forward to seeing you at the workshop! 

 

PG

Author: Gary Knox – gwknox@ufl.edu

Gary Knox is an Extension Specialist and Professor of Environmental Horticulture with the University of Florida at the North Florida Research and Education Center in Quincy. Dr. Knox’s research interests focus on evaluating species and cultivars of woody plants for their invasive potential as well as for ornamental characteristics. In addition to research plantings, Dr. Knox is working with a nonprofit volunteer group to develop “Gardens of the Big Bend,” a series of botanical, teaching and evaluation gardens at the Center.

Gary Knox

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/10/08/gardening-for-pollinator-conservation-workshop-october-13/

October Cattle & Forage Management Reminders

UF/IFAS Beef Cattle & Forage Specialists, and County Extension Agents serving the Florida Panhandle worked to develop a basic management calendar for cattle producers.  The purpose of this calendar is to provide reminders for management techniques with similar timing to those used at the North Florida Research and Education Center’s Beef Unit, near Marianna, Florida.  Links to useful publications with more information are also provided.

Tim Marshall, animal scientist with the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences in Gainesville, uses a special device to feed oral medication to a beef cow to control worms and other internal parasites, Thursday 12/9. Marshall, who teaches a class in livestock management, said internal parasites are a common problem in Florida's cattle industry, but they can be controlled with these treatments once or twice a year.

Dr. Tim Marshall demonstrating to students how to administer paste dewormer. Marshall, who taught a classes in livestock management, said internal parasites are a common problem in Florida’s cattle industry, but they can be controlled with these treatments once or twice a year.

October Management Reminders

Cattle Herd Management

  • Pre-breeding Cow & Heifer Vaccination (1 Month prior to breeding)
  • Feed weaned heifers limited supplement
  • Inventory hay and purchase additional bales as necessary (2 tons/cow)
    • Forage test hay to determine supplement needs
    • Evaluate and repair hay feeding equipment and replace as needed
      • Hay rings, spears, trailers
    • Move yearling heifers to clean, dry calving pasture & record body condition
    • Put together calving emergency kit
  • Increase supplementation to weaned replacement heifers and start feeding hay

Pasture Management

  • If considering alfalfa as monoculture, adjust pH near 7.0 and use a prepared seedbed

Pest Management

  • Scout pastures for poisonous weeds, spray, mow, or remove if found
  • Use nonselective herbicide on pastures that are due for renovation

 Annual Educational Events

Attend Sunbelt Ag Expo October 18-20  (Stop by the UF/IFAS Barn)

**************************************************************************************

Pan Ag logo finalUse the following link to download the entire Cattle & Forage Management Annual Calendar:

Panhandle Ag Extension Team Cattle & Forage Management Calendar

Developed by the Panhandle Agriculture Extension Livestock and Forage Team:

Doug Mayo, Cliff Lamb, Mark Mauldin, Ann Blount, Cheryl Mackowiak, Jose Dubeux, Jay Ferrell, Jennifer Bearden, NicolasDiLorenzo, Shep Eubanks, Jed Dillard, Mike Goodchild, Roy Carter, Henry Grant, John Atkins, and Kalyn Waters

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/10/08/october-cattle-forage-management-reminders/

Gardening for Pollinator Conservation Workshop – October 13th, Quincy FL

Gardening for Pollinator Conservation Workshop – October 13th, Quincy FL

Bee Balm CompressedA “Gardening for Pollinator Conservation” Workshop will take place Thursday, October 13, at the UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center (NFREC) in Quincy. Pollinators are important in conserving native plants, ensuring a plentiful food supply, encouraging biodiversity and helping maintain a healthier ecological environment – – – the so-called “balance of nature.” Come learn how you can conserve and promote pollinators in your own garden, all while beautifying your own little piece of Nature.

As in previous years, nursery vendors will be selling pollinator plants at the Oct. 13 workshop, making it convenient for you to put into practice what you learn at the workshop!  Registration is just $ 15 per person and includes lunch, refreshments, and handouts.

Check out the workshop details and register at: https://gardeningforpollinatorconservation.eventbrite.com/

What: Gardening for Pollinator Conservation

When: Thursday, October 13, 8:30 am to 5:00 pm EDT

Where: University of Florida/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center, 155 Research Road, Quincy, FL. Located just north of I-10 Exit 181, 3 miles south of Quincy, off Pat Thomas Highway, SR 267.

Cost: $ 15 per person (includes lunch, refreshments and handouts)

Registration: https://gardeningforpollinatorconservation.eventbrite.com

For more information, contact: Gary Knox, gwknox@ufl.edu; 850.875.7105

For a printable Flyer click here: Gardening for Pollinators Workshop

Our workshop builds on previous successful pollinator workshops held at Leon Co. Extension last year and in Marianna in 2012. This workshop was developed as a collaboration of county faculty from several extension offices with folks from the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission as well as UF/IFAS NFREC. Sponsors helping defray costs include Florida Native Plant Society – Magnolia Chapter, Gardening Friends of the Big Bend, Inc., Mail-Order Natives, and University of Florida/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center.

We look forward to seeing you at the workshop! 

 

PG

Author: Gary Knox – gwknox@ufl.edu

Gary Knox is an Extension Specialist and Professor of Environmental Horticulture with the University of Florida at the North Florida Research and Education Center in Quincy. Dr. Knox’s research interests focus on evaluating species and cultivars of woody plants for their invasive potential as well as for ornamental characteristics. In addition to research plantings, Dr. Knox is working with a nonprofit volunteer group to develop “Gardens of the Big Bend,” a series of botanical, teaching and evaluation gardens at the Center.

Gary Knox

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/10/07/gardening-for-pollinator-conservation-workshop-october-13th-quincy-fl-2/

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