Tag Archive: Program

Friday Feature: The Peanut Program Works

Friday Feature:  The Peanut Program Works

This week’s featured video was developed by the Southern Peanut Farmers Federation.   They have launched  a campaign called The Peanut Program Works to provide support for the Price Loss Coverage or PLC Program implemented with the 2014 Farm Bill, as lawmakers begin to discuss the next Farm Bill.  This video features a number of Jackson County peanut farmers who took the time to share their thoughts about the need to continue with the PLC program as it is currently being implemented with  a $ 535 per ton reference price, a $ 355 per ton national loan rate, and a maximum $ 180.00 per ton PLC Payment.  The PLC Program was implemented to provide a support program that is directly related to market prices, so when the market is up the payments are decreased, and when the market is down, more support is provided.  However, this program is only provided for farms with  “base acres.”  The 2014 Farm Bill did not allow new base acres to be added, so that has created conflict for farms that began growing peanuts after 2002.

*************************************************************************************

If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/07/08/friday-feature-the-peanut-program-works/

Apply for the Southern Pine Beetle Prevention Program through July 31

Apply for the Southern Pine Beetle Prevention Program through July 31

The Southern Pine Beetle Florida Township Hazard Rating Map is based on a model developed by the USDA Forest Service. The model computes hazard scores based on input variables that estimate the density and basal area of the most susceptible host pine species (e.g., loblolly and shortleaf pine) and soil drainage characteristics. Each township score represents an average for the forested areas within the township. The hazard map is subject to change from year to year with changing forest conditions and improvements made to the hazard model. Hazard is an estimate of where SPB infestations may be likely to develop based on forest conditions; it does not mean that SPB infestations are predicted for a certain area in a given year.

The Florida Forest Service, a division of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, announced on June 15, 2017 that the Southern Pine Beetle Assistance and Prevention Program will accept applications from non-industrial, private forest landowners through July 31.

The southern pine beetle (SPB) is one of the most economically devastating forest pests of the southeast, with periodic outbreaks leading to deaths of millions of pine trees. In 2016, 222 SPB infestations were reported in Florida, killing trees on over 1,100 acres. Those numbers are small compared to the last major outbreaks that occurred in Florida from 1999 to 2002, which resulted in an estimated $ 59 million in timber losses.

The program, supported through a grant by the United States Forest Service, provides incentive payments for:
  • first pulpwood thinning
  • prescribed burning
  • mechanical underbrush treatments
  • planting of longleaf or slash pine rather than the loblolly pine (the beetle’s preferred species)

Since it was first offered in 2005, the program has supported these practices on more than 167,000 acres and helped thousands of landowners. The program is limited to 44 northern Florida counties, the known range of the southern pine beetle. Qualified landowners can apply for up to two different practices per year and funding requests may not exceed $ 10,000. All qualifying applications received during the submission period will be evaluated and ranked for approval.

To obtain an application or to learn more about the Southern Pine Beetle Assistance and Prevention Program,  contact your County Forester or visit FreshFromFlorida.com/SouthernPineBeetle/Prevention.

The Florida Forest Service manages more than 1 million acres of public forest land while protecting homes, forestland and natural resources from the devastating effects of wildfire on more than 26 million acres. To learn more about Florida Forest Service programs, visit FloridaForestService.com.

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/07/03/apply-for-the-southern-pine-beetle-prevention-program-through-july-31/

Has Excess Rain Affected your Cotton Fertility Program?

Has Excess Rain Affected your Cotton Fertility Program?

Michael J. Mulvaney, UF/IFAS Soil Specialist & Glen Harris, UGA Soil Specialist

If you’re like me, you’re watching this rain and wondering where your nutrients are in the soil profile.  The Jay FAWN station has recorded almost 20″ of rain so far in June.  Last week we talked about peanut gypsum application, but this week we’d like to talk about cotton.

Nitrogen (N)

If you applied at-plant N, you might want to re-apply some of it, if you’ve had leaching rainfall events this season.  For BMP purposes, you should document the amount of rainfall to show that leaching likely occurred on your soils.  If you only apply one application at first square, you likely haven’t applied any N yet this season – so there’s still time for you.

To see if you are N deficient, there are commercial cotton petiole tests available from public and private labs in the Southeast. See http://aesl.ces.uga.edu/FeeSchedule/Complete.pdf for more information.  You can also sample representative areas for the youngest fully mature leaf (without petiole).  The leaf tissue N should be in the range of 3.5 to 4.5% N for sufficiency.

Potassium (K)

Those of you on deep sand or soils with no subsoil clay within the top 20 inches should think about K as well.  Modern cotton cultivars have higher K demand than N demand, and K is susceptible to leaching, particularly on very sandy soils.  If you are on deep, sandy soils, you probably already know that you should split your K applications at planting and topdress. Cotton K demand can exceed 3 lbs K2O per acre per day during flowering. Peak K demand comes during flowering and boll set, so K deficiency during this period can lead to boll shed, reduced lint quality, and/or reduced yield.

Source: O. Abaye. 2009. Potassium Fertilization of Cotton. Virginia Cooperative Extension Publication 418-025

K deficiency in cotton shows up as bronzing of leaves and is affiliated with increased Stemphylium disease, as seen below.

Potassium deficiency in cotton appears as bronzing of the leaves. Photo: M. Mulvaney

Oftentimes, we have sufficient soil K according to soil test results, but drought conditions leads to a lack of K in soil water and the plant can’t take it up.  There is still plenty of time for that to happen.  But so far this year, it’s likely to be the opposite problem on deep, sandy soils: K has leached from the rooting zone after you’ve taken your soil samples.

Boron (B)

Boron also leaches easily from sandy soils.  If you are concerned about boron, and you are making a fungicide application at first bloom for Target Spot control, you can consider adding 0.3-0.5 lbs B as a tank mix.  Boron deficiency in cotton is more evident in younger leaf tissue and shows up as stunted or disfigured terminal growing points and shorter, thicker petioles with “coon tailing” visible on the petioles.

Boron deficiency in cotton with “coon tailing” visible on the petioles. Photo credit: Darrin Dodds & Bobby Golden, Mississippi State University

For more information related to this subject, use the following publication link:

Cotton Cultural Practices and Fertility Management

 

PG

Author: Michael Mulvaney – m.mulvaney@ufl.edu

Cropping Systems Specialist, University of Florida, West Florida Research and Education Center, Jay, FL. Follow me @TheDirtDude
http://wfrec.ifas.ufl.edu/people/faculty/dr-michael-mulvaney/

Michael Mulvaney

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/07/03/has-excess-rain-affected-your-cotton-fertility-program/

The Florida Master Naturalist Program Training Local AmeriCorps Volunteers

The Florida Master Naturalist Program Training Local AmeriCorps Volunteers

By: Laura Tiu and Sheila Dunning

 

For the second year in a row, University of Florida Extension Agents Sheila Dunning (horticulture) and Laura Tiu (marine science) taught a Florida Master Naturalist Program (FMNP) Coastal Module to a newly recruited AmeriCorps group in Okaloosa and Walton counties. The AmeriCorps members have been recruited to work with local the non-profit Choctawhatchee Basin Alliance during the 2016-17 school year teaching Grasses in Classes and Dunes and Schools at the local elementary schools.

AmeriCorp volunteers learning about coastal environments by attending the Florida Master Naturalist class.
Photo: Laura Tiu

As part of the training, FMNP students participated in an aquatic species collection training to enable them to collect species for touch tanks used throughout the school year. At the training, we met two Fort Walton Beach High School science teachers. Teachers Marcia Holman and Ashley Daniels (an AmeriCorps 2013 member herself) were surprised to see two former students in our AmeriCorps 2016 FMNP class; Dylan and Kaitlyn.  Dylan, they reported, was a student that many teachers worried about during his freshman year.  However, he just blossomed because of his involvement in the marine classes and environmental ecology club.  They were most proud of his leadership designing and implementing a no-balloon graduation ceremony.  This prevented the release of potentially harmful balloons into our coastal waterways where they pose a hazard to marine life.

 

The teachers were so happy to see both students had joined AmeriCorps and were receiving FMNP training. They realized that they were making a difference in the lives of their students and the students they had trained were working to preserve and protect the environment in their communities.  When asked if they had any other students that we need to be prepared for Holman replied, “It’s hard to tell at this point in the year if we have any rising marine science stars, but we did have 20 kids show up for the first meeting of the ecology kids club.”  We can’t wait to meet them.

PG

Author: Laura Tiu – lgtiu@ufl.edu

Sea Grant Extension Agent – Okaloosa and Walton Counties

Laura Tiu

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/03/31/the-florida-master-naturalist-program-training-local-americorps-volunteers/

Florida Heifer Development Program Hosts Workshop January 6

Florida Heifer Development Program Hosts Workshop January 6

Heifers from the 2016 UF/IFAS Florida Heifer Development Program at the NFREC-Marianna. Photo Credit: K. Waters

Heifers entered in the 2016 Florida Heifer Development Program, at the North Florida Research and Education Center, Marianna. Photo: K. Waters

The investment of time and resources that are required for replacement heifer develop is substantial. However, effective heifer development is critical for continued success within a cattle production system. Research has provided developmental benchmark and practice establishment that will lead to effective heifer development. In addition, advancements in technologies, such as artificial insemination and estrous synchronization protocols, have allowed for continued improvement in replacement heifer development strategies.

On January 6th, 2017 the Florida Heifer Development Program will host a workshop that will focus on replacement heifer development, and the practices that will help producers effectively develop their future cow herd. The meeting will be held at the Beef Unit Pavilion at the North Florida Research and Education Center, Marianna, with registration starting at 8:30 AM Central Time.  The day will start with educational presentations; Dr. Cliff Lamb will serve as the key-note speaker, and Kalyn Waters will also present. Following the presentations, participants will be able to take part in chute-side demonstrations. Lunch will be sponsored by Zoetis, and following lunch, bulls from the Florida Bull Test, which will be offered for sale on January 21, 2017, will be available for preview until 2:30 PM.. fhdp-education-meeting_-flyer_1-6-17Please RSVP to the UF/IFAS Holmes County Extension Office at 850-547-1108 by January 2, 2017 (RSVP is appreciated but not required for attendance).

Download the printer friendly flyer to share with other producers that might be interested in attending:  Replacement Heifer Development Workshop flyer

The UF/IFAS  Florida Heifer Development Program was designed to meet the following objectives:

  1. To successfully develop beef replacement heifers for cattle producers using research-based data on nutritional and reproductive management, to enhance lifetime productivity of heifers in the beef herd.
  2. To provide an educational resource that exposes beef cattle producers to improved animal management techniques associated with development of replacement beef heifers, and educational opportunities that focus on herd health, nutritional management, and artificial insemination.

If you have any questions about the workshop, or the Florida Heifer Development Program, please contact Kalyn Waters at 850-547-1108.

 

PG

Author: Kalyn Waters – kalyn.waters@ufl.edu

Holmes County Extension Director working in the areas of Agricultural Management in row crop, natural resources, livestock and forage production. Specialized in Beef Cattle Production in the area of reproductive, nutritional and finical management.
http://holmes.ufl.ifas.edu

Kalyn Waters

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/12/17/florida-heifer-development-program-hosts-workshop-january-6/

Jackson Cattlemen to Host Forage Variety Program October 4

Jackson Cattlemen to Host Forage Variety Program October 4

Replacement heifers on cool-season forages; North Florida Research and Education Center (NFREC), Marianna - FL. Photo by Jose Dubeux on Dec. 6, 2013.

Replacement heifers on cool-season forages; North Florida Research and Education Center (NFREC), Marianna – FL. Photo by Jose Dubeux on Dec. 6, 2013.

Invitation to Cattle Producers

The Jackson County Cattlemen’s Association invites cattle producers from the region to attend a sponsored hamburger dinner and educational program on New and Recommended Forage Varieties presented by Dr. Ann Blount, UF/IFAS Forage Breeder. In addition,  Billy Arrighi, Zoetis Representative will discuss Management Tips to Add Pounds to the Calves You Market.

JCCA LogoSo mark your calendar for 6:00 pm Tuesday, October 4th and make plans to join us at the Jackson County Ag Conference Center, at 2741 Penn Avenue, Marianna, FL, for this educational program to enhance your beef production and profitability.

There is no registration fee for this sponsored event, however, please RSVP by noon October 3rd via phone call 850-482-9620, or email to Doris Williams.

 

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/09/24/jackson-cattlemen-to-host-forage-variety-program-october-4/

Upcoming Fall Gardening Program Series

Upcoming Fall Gardening Program Series

fall gardening 2016

Click below for more info

Upcoming Fall Gardening Workshop Series August 25th – September 22

 

PG

Author: Matthew Orwat – mjorwat@ufl.edu

Matthew J. Orwat started his career with UF / IFAS in 2011 and is the Horticulture Extension Agent for Washington County Florida. His goal is to provide educational programming to meet the diverse needs of and provide solutions for homeowners and small farmers with ornamental, turf, fruit and vegetable gardening objectives. Please feel free to contact him with any questions you may have.
http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/lng/about/

Matthew Orwat

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/08/11/upcoming-fall-gardening-program-series/

Forest Service offering Cogongrass Control Cost-Share Program

Photo credit: C. Evans, UGA

Cogongrass infestations negatively affect tree growth, wildlife habitat, and property values. Photo credit: C. Evans, UGA

The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services announced on April 20, 2016 that the Florida Forest Service is now accepting applications for the Cogongrass Treatment Cost-Share Program. Applications for the program will be accepted through July 29, 2016.

“Cogongrass is one of the most aggressive weeds in Florida and is capable of rapidly choking out and displacing our native plant species,” said Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam. “Through the Cogongrass Treatment Cost-Share Program, landowners can help stop the spread of this harmful pest in Florida.”

Cogongrass is an invasive, non-native grass that occurs in Florida and several other southeastern states. Cogongrass infestations negatively affect tree regeneration, growth and survival, as well as wildlife habitat, native plant diversity, forage quality and property values. They also increase the risk of wildfires and alter fire behavior.

“Left untreated, invasive cogongrass can spread quickly, causing long-term problems,” said State Forester Jim Karels. “In addition to reducing the productivity and value of forests and rangelands, it can greatly increase the risk and severity of wildfire.”

The Cogongrass Treatment Cost-Share Program, which is supported through a grant from the USDA Forest Service, is offered for non-industrial private lands in all Florida counties. It provides reimbursement of 50 percent of the cost to treat cogongrass infestations with herbicide for two consecutive years.

To obtain an application form or to learn more about program requirements, contact your local Florida Forest Service County Forester or visit the Cogongrass Treatment Cost-Share Program web page. All qualifying applications will be evaluated and ranked for approval.

The Florida Forest Service, a division of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, manages more than 1 million acres of public forest land while protecting homes, forestland and natural resources from the devastating effects of wildfire on more than 26 million acres. Learn more about the Florida Forest Service.

Cogongrass Treatment Cost-Share Program

FFS Cost-Share Application

 

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/04/30/forest-service-offering-cogongrass-control-cost-share-program/

UF/IFAS offers Heifer Development Program for Cattle Producers

UF/IFAS offers Heifer Development Program for Cattle Producers

The Florida Heifer Development Program 

Heifer Program logoAnnually beef cattle producers are faced with the decision of how to replace unproductive females within their herd. For most large commercial ranches, developing their own replacement heifers is a viable option, but for many smaller operations (<100 head) it is not as easy.  Whether it is that lack of labor, experience, facilities, or equipment, it can be hard to justify the cost of developing replacement heifers separate from the mature cow herd.

In an effort to meet this need in the Southeast, County Agents along with State Specialists at the North Florida Research and Education Center in Marianna, are collaborating to offer the Florida Heifer Development Program. This program is designed to receive weaned heifers at the NFREC in the fall, where the Beef Unit staff will develop them and expose them to artificial insemination, followed up with natural service bull breeding, with the ultimate goal of sending pregnant heifers back to the producer in the spring.

The mission of the program is to serve as a resource for cow/calf producers in the Southeastern US, to provide opportunities in education, and the facilitation of replacement heifer development for enhancement of sustainable beef cattle operations.

The program was designed to meet the following objectives:

  1. To successfully develop beef replacement heifers for cattle producers using research-based data on nutritional and reproductive management to enhance lifetime productivity of heifers in the beef herd.
  2. To provide an educational resource that exposes beef cattle producers to improved animal management techniques associated with development of replacement beef heifers and educational opportunities that focus on herd health, nutritional management, and artificial insemination.
Replacement heifers at the NFREC. Photo Credit: Kalyn Waters

Replacement heifers at the NFREC. Photo Credit: Kalyn Waters

The heifers will be housed at the NFREC in Marianna during the 187 day development process (October 1, 2016 to April 6, 2017), during which they will be fed to target gains of 1.50 to 2.25 pounds per day. Heifers will be exposed to two rounds of artificial insemination to either an Angus bull selected by the program leaders, or to semen provided by the consignor, and then cleaned up with calving ease Angus bulls for the remainder of the 68 day breeding season. Heifers will be bred to target a starting calving date of September 25, 2017. Heifers born between August 15, 2015 and November 30, 2015 , with a 1.75 pounds weight per day of age at time of delivery are eligible for nomination. Heifers must be weaned 30 prior to their October 1st delivery, and meet all health and vaccine requirements outlined in the rules and regulations.  The cost of the program will be between $ 550 and $ 650, with the variation being accounted for by the total feed cost.

Nomination of heifers is currently open, with a deadline of August 1, 2016. There is a $ 50.00/head non-refundable fee to nominate heifers. Consignors must also be members of the Florida Cattlemen’s Association. A total of 100 head of heifers will be accepted this first year of the program. Each consignor can nominate up to 10 head per operation.  Heifers will be accepted based on the order in which nomination forms are received. If the100 head program target is not reached, additional consignments, more than 10 heifers, will be accepted on the basis of available space, in the order in which the nomination forms were received.

For more information:

Florida Heifer Development Program 

Nomination Form 

Rules and Regulations 

 

Program Coordinators:

Kalyn Waters
850-547-1108

Dr. Cliff Lamb
850-526-1612

 

PG

Author: Kalyn Waters – kalyn.waters@ufl.edu

Holmes County Extension Director working in the areas of Agricultural Management in row crop, natural resources, livestock and forage production. Specialized in Beef Cattle Production in the area of reproductive, nutritional and finical management.
http://holmes.ufl.ifas.edu

Kalyn Waters

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/04/30/ufifas-offers-heifer-development-program-for-cattle-producers/

2016 Beekeeping Program

2016 Beekeeping Program

beekeeping 2016

PG

Author: Rick O’Connor – roc1@ufl.edu

Sea Grant Extension Agent in Escambia County

Rick O’Connor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/02/08/2016-beekeeping-program/

Older posts «