Tag Archive: Program

The Florida Master Naturalist Program Training Local AmeriCorps Volunteers

The Florida Master Naturalist Program Training Local AmeriCorps Volunteers

By: Laura Tiu and Sheila Dunning

 

For the second year in a row, University of Florida Extension Agents Sheila Dunning (horticulture) and Laura Tiu (marine science) taught a Florida Master Naturalist Program (FMNP) Coastal Module to a newly recruited AmeriCorps group in Okaloosa and Walton counties. The AmeriCorps members have been recruited to work with local the non-profit Choctawhatchee Basin Alliance during the 2016-17 school year teaching Grasses in Classes and Dunes and Schools at the local elementary schools.

AmeriCorp volunteers learning about coastal environments by attending the Florida Master Naturalist class.
Photo: Laura Tiu

As part of the training, FMNP students participated in an aquatic species collection training to enable them to collect species for touch tanks used throughout the school year. At the training, we met two Fort Walton Beach High School science teachers. Teachers Marcia Holman and Ashley Daniels (an AmeriCorps 2013 member herself) were surprised to see two former students in our AmeriCorps 2016 FMNP class; Dylan and Kaitlyn.  Dylan, they reported, was a student that many teachers worried about during his freshman year.  However, he just blossomed because of his involvement in the marine classes and environmental ecology club.  They were most proud of his leadership designing and implementing a no-balloon graduation ceremony.  This prevented the release of potentially harmful balloons into our coastal waterways where they pose a hazard to marine life.

 

The teachers were so happy to see both students had joined AmeriCorps and were receiving FMNP training. They realized that they were making a difference in the lives of their students and the students they had trained were working to preserve and protect the environment in their communities.  When asked if they had any other students that we need to be prepared for Holman replied, “It’s hard to tell at this point in the year if we have any rising marine science stars, but we did have 20 kids show up for the first meeting of the ecology kids club.”  We can’t wait to meet them.

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Author: Laura Tiu – lgtiu@ufl.edu

Sea Grant Extension Agent – Okaloosa and Walton Counties

Laura Tiu

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/03/31/the-florida-master-naturalist-program-training-local-americorps-volunteers/

Florida Heifer Development Program Hosts Workshop January 6

Florida Heifer Development Program Hosts Workshop January 6

Heifers from the 2016 UF/IFAS Florida Heifer Development Program at the NFREC-Marianna. Photo Credit: K. Waters

Heifers entered in the 2016 Florida Heifer Development Program, at the North Florida Research and Education Center, Marianna. Photo: K. Waters

The investment of time and resources that are required for replacement heifer develop is substantial. However, effective heifer development is critical for continued success within a cattle production system. Research has provided developmental benchmark and practice establishment that will lead to effective heifer development. In addition, advancements in technologies, such as artificial insemination and estrous synchronization protocols, have allowed for continued improvement in replacement heifer development strategies.

On January 6th, 2017 the Florida Heifer Development Program will host a workshop that will focus on replacement heifer development, and the practices that will help producers effectively develop their future cow herd. The meeting will be held at the Beef Unit Pavilion at the North Florida Research and Education Center, Marianna, with registration starting at 8:30 AM Central Time.  The day will start with educational presentations; Dr. Cliff Lamb will serve as the key-note speaker, and Kalyn Waters will also present. Following the presentations, participants will be able to take part in chute-side demonstrations. Lunch will be sponsored by Zoetis, and following lunch, bulls from the Florida Bull Test, which will be offered for sale on January 21, 2017, will be available for preview until 2:30 PM.. fhdp-education-meeting_-flyer_1-6-17Please RSVP to the UF/IFAS Holmes County Extension Office at 850-547-1108 by January 2, 2017 (RSVP is appreciated but not required for attendance).

Download the printer friendly flyer to share with other producers that might be interested in attending:  Replacement Heifer Development Workshop flyer

The UF/IFAS  Florida Heifer Development Program was designed to meet the following objectives:

  1. To successfully develop beef replacement heifers for cattle producers using research-based data on nutritional and reproductive management, to enhance lifetime productivity of heifers in the beef herd.
  2. To provide an educational resource that exposes beef cattle producers to improved animal management techniques associated with development of replacement beef heifers, and educational opportunities that focus on herd health, nutritional management, and artificial insemination.

If you have any questions about the workshop, or the Florida Heifer Development Program, please contact Kalyn Waters at 850-547-1108.

 

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Author: Kalyn Waters – kalyn.waters@ufl.edu

Holmes County Extension Director working in the areas of Agricultural Management in row crop, natural resources, livestock and forage production. Specialized in Beef Cattle Production in the area of reproductive, nutritional and finical management.
http://holmes.ufl.ifas.edu

Kalyn Waters

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/12/17/florida-heifer-development-program-hosts-workshop-january-6/

Jackson Cattlemen to Host Forage Variety Program October 4

Jackson Cattlemen to Host Forage Variety Program October 4

Replacement heifers on cool-season forages; North Florida Research and Education Center (NFREC), Marianna - FL. Photo by Jose Dubeux on Dec. 6, 2013.

Replacement heifers on cool-season forages; North Florida Research and Education Center (NFREC), Marianna – FL. Photo by Jose Dubeux on Dec. 6, 2013.

Invitation to Cattle Producers

The Jackson County Cattlemen’s Association invites cattle producers from the region to attend a sponsored hamburger dinner and educational program on New and Recommended Forage Varieties presented by Dr. Ann Blount, UF/IFAS Forage Breeder. In addition,  Billy Arrighi, Zoetis Representative will discuss Management Tips to Add Pounds to the Calves You Market.

JCCA LogoSo mark your calendar for 6:00 pm Tuesday, October 4th and make plans to join us at the Jackson County Ag Conference Center, at 2741 Penn Avenue, Marianna, FL, for this educational program to enhance your beef production and profitability.

There is no registration fee for this sponsored event, however, please RSVP by noon October 3rd via phone call 850-482-9620, or email to Doris Williams.

 

 

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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/09/24/jackson-cattlemen-to-host-forage-variety-program-october-4/

Upcoming Fall Gardening Program Series

Upcoming Fall Gardening Program Series

fall gardening 2016

Click below for more info

Upcoming Fall Gardening Workshop Series August 25th – September 22

 

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Author: Matthew Orwat – mjorwat@ufl.edu

Matthew J. Orwat started his career with UF / IFAS in 2011 and is the Horticulture Extension Agent for Washington County Florida. His goal is to provide educational programming to meet the diverse needs of and provide solutions for homeowners and small farmers with ornamental, turf, fruit and vegetable gardening objectives. Please feel free to contact him with any questions you may have.
http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/lng/about/

Matthew Orwat

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/08/11/upcoming-fall-gardening-program-series/

Forest Service offering Cogongrass Control Cost-Share Program

Photo credit: C. Evans, UGA

Cogongrass infestations negatively affect tree growth, wildlife habitat, and property values. Photo credit: C. Evans, UGA

The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services announced on April 20, 2016 that the Florida Forest Service is now accepting applications for the Cogongrass Treatment Cost-Share Program. Applications for the program will be accepted through July 29, 2016.

“Cogongrass is one of the most aggressive weeds in Florida and is capable of rapidly choking out and displacing our native plant species,” said Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam. “Through the Cogongrass Treatment Cost-Share Program, landowners can help stop the spread of this harmful pest in Florida.”

Cogongrass is an invasive, non-native grass that occurs in Florida and several other southeastern states. Cogongrass infestations negatively affect tree regeneration, growth and survival, as well as wildlife habitat, native plant diversity, forage quality and property values. They also increase the risk of wildfires and alter fire behavior.

“Left untreated, invasive cogongrass can spread quickly, causing long-term problems,” said State Forester Jim Karels. “In addition to reducing the productivity and value of forests and rangelands, it can greatly increase the risk and severity of wildfire.”

The Cogongrass Treatment Cost-Share Program, which is supported through a grant from the USDA Forest Service, is offered for non-industrial private lands in all Florida counties. It provides reimbursement of 50 percent of the cost to treat cogongrass infestations with herbicide for two consecutive years.

To obtain an application form or to learn more about program requirements, contact your local Florida Forest Service County Forester or visit the Cogongrass Treatment Cost-Share Program web page. All qualifying applications will be evaluated and ranked for approval.

The Florida Forest Service, a division of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, manages more than 1 million acres of public forest land while protecting homes, forestland and natural resources from the devastating effects of wildfire on more than 26 million acres. Learn more about the Florida Forest Service.

Cogongrass Treatment Cost-Share Program

FFS Cost-Share Application

 

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Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/04/30/forest-service-offering-cogongrass-control-cost-share-program/

UF/IFAS offers Heifer Development Program for Cattle Producers

UF/IFAS offers Heifer Development Program for Cattle Producers

The Florida Heifer Development Program 

Heifer Program logoAnnually beef cattle producers are faced with the decision of how to replace unproductive females within their herd. For most large commercial ranches, developing their own replacement heifers is a viable option, but for many smaller operations (<100 head) it is not as easy.  Whether it is that lack of labor, experience, facilities, or equipment, it can be hard to justify the cost of developing replacement heifers separate from the mature cow herd.

In an effort to meet this need in the Southeast, County Agents along with State Specialists at the North Florida Research and Education Center in Marianna, are collaborating to offer the Florida Heifer Development Program. This program is designed to receive weaned heifers at the NFREC in the fall, where the Beef Unit staff will develop them and expose them to artificial insemination, followed up with natural service bull breeding, with the ultimate goal of sending pregnant heifers back to the producer in the spring.

The mission of the program is to serve as a resource for cow/calf producers in the Southeastern US, to provide opportunities in education, and the facilitation of replacement heifer development for enhancement of sustainable beef cattle operations.

The program was designed to meet the following objectives:

  1. To successfully develop beef replacement heifers for cattle producers using research-based data on nutritional and reproductive management to enhance lifetime productivity of heifers in the beef herd.
  2. To provide an educational resource that exposes beef cattle producers to improved animal management techniques associated with development of replacement beef heifers and educational opportunities that focus on herd health, nutritional management, and artificial insemination.
Replacement heifers at the NFREC. Photo Credit: Kalyn Waters

Replacement heifers at the NFREC. Photo Credit: Kalyn Waters

The heifers will be housed at the NFREC in Marianna during the 187 day development process (October 1, 2016 to April 6, 2017), during which they will be fed to target gains of 1.50 to 2.25 pounds per day. Heifers will be exposed to two rounds of artificial insemination to either an Angus bull selected by the program leaders, or to semen provided by the consignor, and then cleaned up with calving ease Angus bulls for the remainder of the 68 day breeding season. Heifers will be bred to target a starting calving date of September 25, 2017. Heifers born between August 15, 2015 and November 30, 2015 , with a 1.75 pounds weight per day of age at time of delivery are eligible for nomination. Heifers must be weaned 30 prior to their October 1st delivery, and meet all health and vaccine requirements outlined in the rules and regulations.  The cost of the program will be between $ 550 and $ 650, with the variation being accounted for by the total feed cost.

Nomination of heifers is currently open, with a deadline of August 1, 2016. There is a $ 50.00/head non-refundable fee to nominate heifers. Consignors must also be members of the Florida Cattlemen’s Association. A total of 100 head of heifers will be accepted this first year of the program. Each consignor can nominate up to 10 head per operation.  Heifers will be accepted based on the order in which nomination forms are received. If the100 head program target is not reached, additional consignments, more than 10 heifers, will be accepted on the basis of available space, in the order in which the nomination forms were received.

For more information:

Florida Heifer Development Program 

Nomination Form 

Rules and Regulations 

 

Program Coordinators:

Kalyn Waters
850-547-1108

Dr. Cliff Lamb
850-526-1612

 

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Author: Kalyn Waters – kalyn.waters@ufl.edu

Holmes County Extension Director working in the areas of Agricultural Management in row crop, natural resources, livestock and forage production. Specialized in Beef Cattle Production in the area of reproductive, nutritional and finical management.
http://holmes.ufl.ifas.edu

Kalyn Waters

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/04/30/ufifas-offers-heifer-development-program-for-cattle-producers/

2016 Beekeeping Program

2016 Beekeeping Program

beekeeping 2016

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Author: Rick O’Connor – roc1@ufl.edu

Sea Grant Extension Agent in Escambia County

Rick O’Connor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/02/08/2016-beekeeping-program/

Leon County Extension Launches “Adopt-a-Garden” Volunteer Program

Leon County Extension Launches “Adopt-a-Garden” Volunteer Program

Volunteers after lots of hard work mulching and adding compost to eight raised beds at The Shelter garden.

Volunteers after lots of hard work mulching and adding compost to eight raised beds at The Shelter garden.

Have you ever been interested in volunteering at a school or community garden? Are you involved with a garden that could use some help? Well, UF/IFAS Leon County Extension recently started an Adopt-a-Garden program for volunteers to “adopt” a school or community garden for volunteer credit. Volunteers can teach hands-on gardening techniques, conduct educational talks and present displays at garden workdays, assist with garden planning and networking, encourage gardeners to work together, and help with any other activity that adds to the vitality of the garden. The program focuses on garden education and outreach as the primary objectives.

Volunteers hard at work planting fall vegetables in The Shelter garden.

The first major project of the Adopt-a-Garden program has been very exciting, with UF/IFAS Leon County Extension Master Gardeners “adopting” the new homeless shelter at the Kearney Center in Leon County. Master Gardeners lead the way in the organization and construction of eight raised bed vegetable gardens located on site directly behind The Shelter facility. They were awarded a community garden mini-grant from Leon County, which helped to cover garden supplies.

The Leon County Master Gardeners have received assistance from UF/IFAS Extension Agents, Florida State’s College of Social Work, and many other members of the community in gathering supplies and donations, recruiting volunteers, communicating with The Shelter staff, building and filling the raised beds, planting the garden, and maintaining the garden.

The gardening materials for The Shelter garden were generously supplied at no coast or at discounted costs by Lowe’s Home Improvement, Britt’s Dump Truck Services, Tallahassee Nurseries, Native Nurseries, Asplundh, and the FSU College of Social Work.

Shelter resident watering freshly planted lettuce.

Shelter resident watering freshly planted lettuce.

Leon County Extension and Leon County’s Office of Resource Stewardship will conduct shelter resident and staff garden trainings to ensure the garden is maintained and successful going forward. Extension’s Family Nutrition Program is currently offering nutrition education classes to shelter residents as well.

This project will allow shelter residents to get hands-on experience working in a vegetable garden, learn about different vegetable varieties, and taste their harvest, as vegetables that are grown in the garden go directly to The Shelter kitchen for meal preparation. The garden was officially dedicated as the Wendy Crook Memorial Garden by Leon County Government, with the dedication event reported by local television station ABC 27 WTXL. The article and video clip can be viewed here.

Along with the Wendy Crook Memorial Garden, other school and community gardens have been “adopted” by volunteers. If you are in the Leon County area and are interested in becoming a volunteer with the Adopt-a-Garden program, you can find out more information at the Leon County Adopt-a-Garden website or contact Extension Agent Molly Jameson, at mjameson@ufl.edu. Volunteers are encouraged to team up on garden projects and all levels of gardening experience are welcome.

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Author: Molly Jameson – mjameson@ufl.edu

Molly Jameson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/01/14/leon-county-extension-launches-adopt-a-garden-volunteer-program/

NRCS EQIP Program Application Deadline December 18

NRCS BannerApplication deadline for NRCS financial assistance December 18

Florida farmers and ranchers can apply until Friday, December 18, 2015, for financial and technical assistance from USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) programs for fiscal year 2016 funding. Although applications are accepted on a continuous basis for all programs, funding selections are typically made once a year.

Through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP), landowners may receive financial and technical assistance to improve soil, water, air, plants, animals and related resources. Eligible land includes cropland, rangeland, pastureland, private non-industrial forestland and other farm or ranch lands.

The Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP) provides financial and technical assistance to conserve agricultural lands and wetlands. Agricultural Land Easements help farmers and ranchers keep their land in agriculture. Eligible partners are Indian tribes, state and local governments and non-governmental organizations that have farmland or grassland protection programs. Wetland Reserve Easements offer technical and financial assistance directly to private landowners and Indian tribes to restore, protect and enhance wetlands through the purchase of a wetland easement.

Begin by visiting your local NRCS field office and requesting help developing a conservation plan. Our experts provide this free service to help you use your natural resources more efficiently. To learn about technical and financial assistance available from NRCS, go to Getting Started with NRCS.

 

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Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/12/11/nrcs-eqip-program-application-deadline-december-18/

Southern Pine Beetle Assistance Program Now Accepting Applications

Southern Pine Beetle Assistance Program Now Accepting Applications

Figure 1. Pitch tubes of the southern pine beetle (SPB), Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann, on outer bark. Photograph by James. R. Meeker, FDACS, Division of Forestry. Figure 4. Lateral view of southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann. Photograph by David T. Almquist, University of Florida.

Pitch tubes of the southern pine beetle (SPB), Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann, on outer bark. Photograph by James. R. Meeker, FDACS, Division of Forestry. Image inset is the southern pine beetle, Photograph by David T. Almquist, University of Florida.

Applications From Private Forest Landowners Will Be Accepted June 6-July 18

Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam announced that the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services’ Florida Forest Service is now accepting applications for the Southern Pine Beetle Assistance and Prevention Program. The sign-up period will run from June 6 through July 18 and is available for non-industrial private forest landowners.

“The southern pine beetle is one of the most destructive forest pests in the Southeast,” said Commissioner Putnam. “By taking preventative measures now, Florida’s private landowners can greatly reduce their risk of timber loss during future outbreaks.”

Periodic outbreaks can rapidly kill millions of pine trees and deplete tens of thousands of acres of timber resources. The most recent series of major southern pine beetle outbreaks resulted in an estimated $ 59 million in timber loss between 1999 and 2002.

The Southern Pine Beetle Assistance Program is offered for private lands in 44 northern Florida counties. (See a map of the eligible counties.)

The program provides incentive payments for the following:

  • Conducting a first pulpwood thinning
  • Conducting prescribed burning operations
  • Conducting mechanical underbrush treatments
  • Planting longleaf or slash pine

“Since 2005, we have assisted many private forest land owners through this program,” said Jim Karels, Director of the Florida Forest Service. “More than 150,000 Florida acres have been treated for southern pine beetle prevention.”

To learn more about this program and obtain an application form, contact a local Florida Forest Service office or visit www.FreshFromFlorida.com/SouthernPineBeetle/Prevention. Qualified landowners may apply for no more than two approved preventative practices per year. Funding requests may not exceed $ 10,000 annually. All qualifying applications will be evaluated and ranked for approval. This program is supported through a grant from the U.S. Forest Service.

For more information on the biology, ecology, and effects of the Southern Pine Beetle, please see the following UF/IFAS Publication:  Southern Pine Beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Insecta: Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

 

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Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/05/16/southern-pine-beetle-assistance-program-now-accepting-applications/

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