Tag Archive: “Purple”

Plan to Purple Up on April 21st

April is the Month of The Military Child! When we think of honoring our military, we often think of Memorial Day and Veterans Day. Did you know there is also a time identified to honor our youngest heroes, military children? Since 1986, April has been designated Month of the Military Child. This allows us to honor military children and their families for their commitment and sacrifice. In Florida, we have over 94K active and reserve military members whose families worry that they are in harm’s way when they deploy. Most people think of the color green when they think of 4-H, but on April 21st, 4-H youth and volunteers in Florida and Nationally will be sporting the color purple to show support for our military families.
Here locally we want you to join us in showing your support and to celebrate our young heroes! Participate in the 7th annual Purple Up! For Military Kids. Wear purple on Friday, April 21st, as a visible way to show support and thank military children for their strength and sacrifices. Why purple? Purple is the color that symbolizes all branches of the military, as it is the combination of Army green, Coast Guard blue, Air Force blue, Marine red and Navy blue.
The goal is for our military youth to see the support of their community. Please join us in honoring these young heroes as we Purple Up! For Military Kids on April 21st! Be creative….the goal is for military youth to see the support in their school, youth groups, and the community! If you don’t have or own a purple shirt wear a purple ribbon, tie, headband etc. Just show your support and let our youth know we care about them! Can’t make the 21st ? Then do something another day in April. We would like to encourage you to take pictures of your group wearing purple and share them on social media using #fl4h, #purpleup.

PG

Author: pmdavis – pmdavis@ufl.edu

4-H Youth Development Faculty Bay County Extension
http://bay.ifas.ufl.edu/4-h/

pmdavis

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/04/06/plan-to-purple-up-on-april-21st/

Purple Triangles in the Trees

Purple Triangles in the Trees

From time to time I am reminded of how little I know.  Honestly, I am reminded on a daily basis. A few weeks ago someone asked me about the purple things hanging from the trees. Luckily, the person gave me some good southern directions on where I could find one of these things hanging around in Marianna. So I drove out to the site to get a better look. What I saw hanging in the tree was a three-sided, purple triangle about two feet tall and a foot wide.  It looked to me like someone got a box kite stuck in a tree. Upon further research, it was determined this box kite like thing was a monitoring trap for the emerald ash borer (EAB).

A woman hanging an emerald ash borer trap in a tree. Photo Credit: Texas A&M University

A woman hanging an emerald ash borer trap in a tree. Photo Credit: Texas A&M University

The emerald ash borer (EAB) is a destructive, exotic wood-boring beetle native to Asia. It was first discovered in North America in July 2002 and has made a home in Michigan, Ohio and Ontario, Canada. Millions of ash trees have been killed by the EAB in Michigan and invested ash tree nursery stock in other states indicates the potential for increased spread of the pest. EAB has made its way to the south and has been found in Louisiana and Arkansas.

Monitoring traps are not the only means of EAB detection. A proactive approach utilizing observant citizens can help keep an eye out for potential populations. You can use these tips to monitor your community for emerald ash borers:

Ash Tree Identification – Ash trees are identified by their (1) opposite branching pattern, (2) compound leaves with 5-9 leaflets, and (3) diamond shaped bark ridges on mature trees.

A compound leaf of an ash tree. Photo Credit: FDACS

A compound leaf of an ash tree. Photo Credit: FDACS

Woodpecker Damage – Of course, not all woodpecker damage on ash trees is associated with EAB infestation, but woodpecker damage in the upper part of the tree can indicate their presence.  The woodpecker damage is usually accompanied by vertical cracks in the bark.

Canopy Thinning – As the attack progresses, bark cracking continues and the canopy in the upper half of the tree begins to thin.

Michigan ash tree showing decline due to Emerald ash borer. Photo Credit: USDA

Michigan ash tree showing decline due to Emerald ash borer. Photo Credit: USDA

Tunnels and Holes – The emerald ash borer makes distinctive S-shaped tunnels that differ from damage from other borers.

EAB Damage (left) VS Other Borer Damage. Photo Credit: Texas A&M University

EAB Damage (left) VS Other Borer Damage (right). Photo Credit: Texas A&M University

This beetle hitchhikes on firewood and infests new areas at an alarming rate.  Although the EAB has not yet been detected in Florida, transporting firewood from other states puts Florida ash trees at risk. Your help is needed to detect possible infestations so they can be quickly eradicated. The information available at the following links will help you identify the EAB, EAB host trees, and infestation symptoms.

 

PG

Author: Matt Lollar – mlollar@ufl.edu

Matt Lollar is the Jackson County Horticulture Agent. He has 5 years of experience with University of Florida/IFAS Extension and he began his career in Sanford, FL as the Seminole County Horticulture Agent. Matt is originally from Belle Fontaine, AL. He earned his MS and BS degrees in Horticulture Production from Auburn University.

Matt Lollar

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/05/24/purple-triangles-in-the-trees/

Time to Purple UP!

Hearts of Gold 4-H Purple Up sign4-H Clubs and many others will be sporting the color Purple to support military youth on April 8! Join them celebrating April Month of the Military Child and Purple UP! Day April 8 or April 15. Be creative….the goal is for military youth to see the support in their school, youth groups, and the community! If you don’t have or own a purple shirt wear a purple ribbon, tie, headband etc. Just show your support and let our youth know we care about them! Can’t make the 8th then do something another day in April. We would like to encourage you to take pictures of your group wearing purple and share them on social media. This allows us to honor our young heroes and their families for their commitment and sacrifice for our freedom!

PG

Author: pmdavis – pmdavis@ufl.edu

4-H Youth Development Faculty Bay County Extension
http://bay.ifas.ufl.edu/4-h/

pmdavis

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/04/14/time-to-purple-up/

Hearts of Gold 4-H Club Prepares to Purple Up April 8!

Hearts of Gold 4-H Club

Hearts of Gold 4-H Club

Hearts of Gold 4-H Club and many others will be sporting the color Purple to support military youth on April 8! Join them celebrating April Month of the Military Child and Purple UP! Day April 8 or April 15. Be creative….the goal is for military youth to see the support in their school, youth groups, and the community! If you don’t have or own a purple shirt wear a purple ribbon, tie, headband etc. Just show your support and let our youth know we care about them! Can’t make the 8th then do something another day in April. We would like to encourage you to take pictures of your group wearing purple and share them on social media  http://fb.me/msg/bayifas . This allows us to honor our young heroes and their families for their commitment and sacrifice for our freedom!

PG

Author: pmdavis – pmdavis@ufl.edu

4-H Youth Development Faculty Bay County Extension
http://bay.ifas.ufl.edu/4-h/

pmdavis

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/04/07/hearts-of-gold-4-h-club-prepares-to-purple-up-april-8/

Go Purple to Support Military Youth

Show military youth that you care- wear purple on April 8th!

Show military youth that you care- wear purple on April 8th!

April is the Month of The Military Child! When we think of honoring our military, we often think of Memorial Day and Veterans Day.  Did you know there is also a time identified to honor our youngest heroes, military children?  Since 1986, April has been designated Month of the Military Child. This allows us to honor military children and their families for their commitment and sacrifice. In Florida we have over 51,000 military youth who deal with situations like having their parents in harm’s way when they deploy. Most people think of the color green when they think of 4-H, but on April 8th, 4-H youth and volunteers in Florida will be sporting the color purple to show support for our military families.

Imagine if someone close to you were deployed.  Would you like to see all the news reports showing bombs exploding and people shooting at each other?  How would you feel about having long and repeated separations when your parent misses important events like birthdays, holidays, school and sporting events? Would you like it if your family had frequent relocations/moves?  Every time families move, children have to make new friends, get used to new schools, and find new 4-H clubs and teams to join.

A lot of military children take these changes in stride and some even thrive on them, but it is also hard – kids have to rebuild their world every time they move.  UF/IFAS Extension and 4-H are proud to be a part of the military family working with youth centers across the nation to have some consistency for youth in these situations and who are making these moves.

Here locally we want you to join us in showing your support and to celebrate our young heroes! Participate in the 6th annual Purple Up! For Military Kids Wear purple on Friday, April 8th, as a visible way to show support and thank military children for their strength and sacrifices. Why purple? Purple is the color that symbolizes all branches of the military, as it is the combination of Army green, Coast Guard blue, Air Force blue, Marine red and Navy blue.

The goal is for our military youth to see the support of their community. Please join us in honoring these young heroes as we Purple Up! For Military Kids on April 8th! Be creative….the goal is for military youth to see the support in their school, youth groups, and the community! If you don’t have or own a purple shirt wear a purple ribbon, tie, headband etc. Just show your support and let our youth know we care about them! Can’t make the 8th then do something another day in April. We would like to encourage you to take pictures of your group wearing purple and share them on social media. If you are willing to share then e-mail them to us.:bay@ifas.ufl.edu or post photos to Facebook and tag us https://www.facebook.com/bayifas/ or comment and add your photo.

PG

Author: pmdavis – pmdavis@ufl.edu

4-H Youth Development Faculty Bay County Extension
http://bay.ifas.ufl.edu/4-h/

pmdavis

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/04/01/go-purple-to-support-military-youth/

Southern Purple Mint Moth

One very popular herb for the backyard garden is the evergreen Rosemary, Rosmarinus officinalis which serves as an attractive landscape shrub in addition to its culinary uses. Rosemary grows best in full sun and well-drained soils. When planted in the ground, rosemary can grow 4-5 feet in height and spread. Plants do have beautiful bluish flowers that form in late winter and early spring, providing nectar for bees.

Rosemary officinalis

Rosemary is generally a pest free plant but some gardeners may find damage resulting from an insect pest. Rosemary is one of the hosts for the Southern purple mint moth, Pyrausta laticlavia which will lay eggs on several plants in the mint family. Caterpillars feed on leaves along the stems which become matted with silken threads and frass from the insects. As a result of the feeding, leaves are not useable and plants do not look attractive. Heavy populations will stress plants.Rosemary damage_moth

Since rosemary is often used to flavor many foods, many people do not want to use an insecticide on the plant. One least toxic option that can be used safely on edibles is Bacillus thuringiensis. The product is specific for caterpillar management and safe for predators that may help manage some caterpillars.  Homeowners may also physically remove caterpillars or prune out damaged stems on larger plants.

PG

Author: Beth Bolles – bbolles@ufl.edu

Horticulture Agent, Escambia County

Beth Bolles

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/06/29/southern-purple-mint-moth/

Purple Hyacinth Bean – What’s Old is New

Purple Hyacinth Bean – What’s Old is New

Everyone is interested in growing an easy plant that offers interest all throughout the warm season. Look no further than an old favorite, the purple hyacinth bean, Lablab purpurea.

Lablab purpurea - Hyacinth bean

Purple flowers are held above foliage.

An warm season annual vine that grows easily from seeds plants directly in the ground or started in small pots, purple hyacinth bean will quickly cover a trellis, fence, or other sturdy support that you provide. One of the features will be beautiful purple flowers that form on purple stems during the summer. Purple pods will form after the flowers fade and persist until a frost. Mature seeds can be collected and saved for planting the following spring. Seeds that fall to the ground are likely to sprout on their own when soils warm again the following year.

Even though purple hyacinth bean is an edible plant in many parts of the world, it is mostly considered an ornamental in our area. One of the reasons is that raw beans are poisonous and must be properly cooked before eaten. Because of the toxicity of the beans, it is best to plant in the ornamental garden rather than the edible garden.

Additional features of this easy vine are that it is low maintenance, requiring little fertilization and it attracts bees and butterflies. Install seeds or transplants in well drained soil in full sun and you are ensured a plant that will attract attention.

 

PG

Author: Beth Bolles – bbolles@ufl.edu

Horticulture Agent, Escambia County

Beth Bolles

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/05/06/purple-hyacinth-bean-whats-old-is-new/

4-H Goes “Purple” to Show Support to Military Families

Most people think of the color green when they think of 4-H, but on April 10th, 4-H youth and volunteers in Florida will be sporting the color purple to show support for our military families.  When we think of honoring our military, we often think of Memorial Day and Veterans Day.  Did you know there is also a time identified to honor military children?  Since 1986, April has been designated Month of the Military Child. This allows us to honor military children for their commitment and sacrifice. Here in the Florida Panhandle we have over 27,800 military youth who deal with situations like having their parents in harm’s way when they deploy.

Tyndall 2

Imagine if someone close to you were deployed.  Would you like to see all the news reports showing bombs exploding and people shooting at each other?  How would you feel about having long and repeated separations when your parent misses important events like birthdays, holidays, school and sporting events? Would you like it if your family had frequent relocations/moves?  Every time families move, children have to make new friends, get used to new schools, and find new 4-H clubs and teams to join.

A lot of military children take these changes in stride and some even thrive on them, but it is hard also – kids have to rebuild their world every time they move.  UF/IFAS Extension and 4-H are proud to be a part of the military family working with youth centers across the nation to have some consistency for youth in these situations and who are making these moves. Here locally we want you to join us in showing your support.

So what can you do to show them that we appreciate their sacrifices?

1. Participate in the 4th annual Purple Up! For Military Kids Wear purple on Friday, April 10th, as a visible way to show support and thank military children for their strength and sacrifices. Why purple? Purple is the color that symbolizes all branches of the military, as it is the combination of Army green, Coast Guard blue, Air Force blue, Marine red and Navy blue.

2. Ask others to Purple Up! We hope everyone will take this opportunity to appreciate and celebrate these young heroes and to thank military families for their support and the freedoms they provide us by their service and sacrifices.  Here are a few ideas:

  • Ask your local, regional, state, and federal officials to wear purple on April 10thpurple up logo
  • Engage fraternal organizations, social clubs, and Rotary groups
  • Request local businesses to post a Purple Up! message on their roadside signs
  • Ask stores and restaurants to put a Purple Up! flyer in their business window
  • Suggest companies and businesses ask their employees to wear purple
  • Invite coworkers, as well as members of your spiritual community, exercise class, or golf league to join you in showing support for the military youth in your town by wearing purple on April 10th.

For more information, contact Paula Davis, Ed.D. at the Bay County Extension Office at 850-784-6105.  All programs are open to all persons regardless of race, color, age, sex, handicap or national origin.

PG

Author: pmdavis – pmdavis@ufl.edu

4-H Youth Development Faculty Bay County Extension
http://bay.ifas.ufl.edu/4-h/

pmdavis

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/04/08/4-h-goes-purple-to-show-support-to-military-families/