Tag Archive: School

Seven Tips for a Healthy School Lunch

Seven Tips for a Healthy School Lunch

Jazz up traditional peanut butter sandwiches with raisins or carrot straws.

Now that school is back in session, are your struggling to find healthy and safe lunches to pack?  Do you cringe with every peanut butter and jelly sandwich you make?  If you are like me, finding healthy lunch time meals that are packed with nutrition, offer some variety, and won’t end up in the trash requires planning, creativity, and lots of energy!

  1. Get children involved! Even young school-age children can help make their own lunch.  Give children healthy choices and let them decide lunch menus.  Children may be more willing to eat the food you pack if they have been involved in the process.
  2. Dunk it and dip it. Children love finger foods they can dip.  Serve raw vegetables with hummus or fresh fruit with yogurt.
  3. Offer some “fun foods.” Let children choose some low-calorie fun foods.  Healthy or low-calorie options for the sweet or crunchy tooth include pretzels, plain popcorn, mini rice cakes, low-fat pudding, a miniature chocolate bar, or a rice crispy treat.
  4. Jazz up boring favorites. Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are a nutritious favorite.  Liven them up with carrot straws or raisins.  Add color and nutrition to sandwiches with lettuce, tomato, or sliced vegetables.
  5. Keep lunches safe. Make sandwiches the night before and freeze them.  Freeze juice boxes or water bottles to keep foods cool and for a cool lunchtime beverage.  Experiment to be sure there is enough time before lunch for the items to thaw.
  6. Re-think leftovers. Even if children don’t have access to a microwave to reheat food from last night’s dinner, some leftovers work for lunch, too. Try cold pizza, meat sliced for a sandwich, or pasta salad.
  7. Skip the fuss and sign up for the National School Lunch Program. While some schools may offer free and reduced-price lunches to eligible families, the school lunch program is for everyone.  School lunches provide low cost, balanced meals that follow USDA dietary guidelines.  Take a break from packing lunch and check out your school’s lunch menu.

Turkey Rolls:
2 flour tortillas
2 tsp mayonnaise
2 slices thinly sliced deli turkey
½ cup shredded lettuce
2 Tbsp shredded cheese, any type

Lay out tortillas. Spread with mayonnaise. Layer turkey slice, lettuce and cheese onto tortillas. Roll up and wrap. Makes 2 servings.

One serving provides 218 calories, 9 g total fat, 20 g carbohydrate and 14 g protein.
Exchanges – 1 bread, 2 meats, 2 fats.

Recipe source:  Janis G. Hunter, HGIC Nutrition Specialist, and Katherine L. Cason, Professor, Department of Food, Nutrition, and Packaging Sciences, Clemson University, New 08/08. Revised 09/11. Image added 8/15.  HGIC 4114

 

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Author: Kendra Zamojski – hughson@ufl.edu

Kendra Zamojski is a Family and Consumer Sciences Agent III in the Northwest District.
http://leon.ifas.ufl.edu

Kendra Zamojski

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/24/seven-tips-for-a-healthy-school-lunch/

Panhandle Outdoors Water School – St. Joseph Bay

Panhandle Outdoors Water School – St. Joseph Bay

Our first POL program will happen this week – August 17 – at the Navarre Beach snorkel reef, and is sold out!  We are glad you all are interested in these programs.

 

Well!  We have another one for you.  The Natural Resource Extension Agents from UF IFAS Extension will be holding a two-day water school at St. Joseph Bay.  Participants will learn all about the coastal ecosystems surrounding St. Joe Bay in the classroom, snorkeling, and kayaking.  Kayaks and overnight accommodations are available for those interested.  This water school will be September 19-20.  For more information contact Extension Agent Ray Bodrey in Gulf County or Erik Lovestrand in Franklin.  Information and registration can be found at https://stjosephbay-waterschool.eventbrite.com.


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Author: Rick O’Connor – roc1@ufl.edu

Sea Grant Extension Agent in Escambia County

Rick O’Connor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/11/panhandle-outdoors-water-school-st-joseph-bay/

Tips for a Successful School Year

1182266_studentsWhere did the summer go?  It’s hard to believe that in many counties, school starts next week!  I wanted to share a few things that will help make this school year successful for your family.  It’s no surprise that success — or failure — at school starts at home. Studies have linked poor academic performance to factors such as a lack of sleep, poor nutrition, obesity, and a lack of parental support.

The good news is that those same studies also show higher test scores for students who live in homes with healthy habits, regular routines, and good communication. What does this mean?  Let’s brainstorm on ways you can ensure your child heads off to school this fall with the best possible foundation.

Organization is definitely a key factor to help your child. A student agenda notebook or planner is a great tool, or if they are able to use electronic devices have them use a planning program/calendar. Encourage them to review their assignments before leaving school to make sure they bring home the appropriate books and materials.

At home, remind them to look at the planner instead of trying to work from memory. Establish a place where your child can study daily and do their homework. Be sure it is free from distractions and have school supplies easily accessible. Make it your children’s responsibility to let you know when they run low on supplies. As much as possible, be available during this time in case your child needs help. Assist your child on making a list of all the things going on weekly and break down big assignments into smaller chunks they can do daily.

Have family meetings to be sure everyone knows what is happening for the week. My family usually meets on Sundays. It is a time when we work out transportation, meal plans, extracurricular activities and homework times.

Look for ways to teach your child throughout the day. For example, cooking combines elements of math and science. Use the time when you make dinner as an opportunity to read and follow directions, to discuss fractions, to make hypotheses and to examine results.

Choosing to make schoolwork a priority over socializing with friends is one of the biggest challenges facing school children. Institute a work first/play later policy. With “work first/play later,” kids are expected to get all of their work done before visiting friends, chatting online or playing games. Explain that there will be consequences if this policy isn’t met, and be prepared to follow through. Offer praise for a job well done. Though they may not act like your approval matters, it is still very important and it does motivate them. All children need down time, and playing both alone and with other children is good for both their intellectual and social skills. Eventually a well-developed work ethic will result in a big pay-off. Celebrate their successes. A family dinner out to celebrate a solid mid-year report can boost their spirits and encourage them to keep putting in the effort.

Model good learning behavior in the way you deal with your job and household responsibilities and let your children know that you are still learning. Be sure that you show your child – through your own action – that good educational habits yield great rewards.

Related articles:

For more information go to http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topics/families/children.html or contact your local UF/IFAS Extension Office.

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Author: pmdavis – pmdavis@ufl.edu

4-H Youth Development Faculty Bay County Extension
http://bay.ifas.ufl.edu/4-h/

pmdavis

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/08/05/tips-for-a-successful-school-year/

Panhandle Outdoors: St. Joseph Bay Coastal Ecosystem Water School

Panhandle Outdoors: St. Joseph Bay Coastal Ecosystem Water School

polNorthwest Florida is considered one of the top six biodiversity hotspots in the country. The reasons why begin with our unique water features.  The University of Florida IFAS Extension faculty are expanding their acclaimed “Panhandle Outdoors Live!” field trips into two-day events for 2016. They will include presentations as well as traditional excursions to explore and learn about the Panhandle’s signature aquatic ecosystems.

This upcoming two-day, September 7 & 8,  educational adventure is based at the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve near the coastal town of Port. St. Joe, Florida. It includes field tours of unique coastal uplands, presentations by scientists and naturalists, and a kayak trip to explore the underwater life of the seagrass beds.

The St. Joseph Bay Ecosystem is home to one of the richest concentrations of marine grasses along the Northern Gulf Coast. It supports an amazing diversity of fish, aquatic invertebrates and birds. Other local habitats of significance include nesting beaches of loggerhead sea turtles, salt marshes that support secretive marsh birds, and pine flatwoods uplands.  

Important!

Join us to explore these waters and learn more about the Panhandle’s hidden ecological treasures!

There are several ticket options for this water school to choose from at Eventbrite.com.  For more information please contact Erik Lovestrand at 850-653-9337 or elovestrand@ufl.edu and download this printer friendly flyer:  Panhandle Outdoors St. Joseph Bay 2016

 

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Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/07/23/panhandle-outdoors-st-joseph-bay-coastal-ecosystem-water-school/

Collegiate 4-H: Growing #TrueLeaders Beyond High School

Did you know that you can extend your 4-H experience through your college years?  If you plan on attending college consider joining Collegiate 4-H.   Collegiate 4-H is an organization that provides its members with a sense of identity on campus, enriches their lives through group projects and recreation, and develops confidence and leadership skills. At the University of Florida, Collegiate 4-H provides service and support to Alachua County 4-H and the Florida 4-H State Programs.  Collegiate 4-H is not only a professional organization, but also a service and social organization.  Some of the ways they support 4-H include serving as judges, mentors, and volunteers. Recently, the executive officers of the UF Collegiate 4-H supported our district-wide Teen Retreat.  Last year, the Collegiate 4-H chapter at UF hosted the National Collegiate 4-H Conference in Gainesville, FL.  Earlier this spring, they were invited to attend and present at the National STEM Conference in Washington, DC.  Being a Collegiate 4-H member can open lots of doors for scholarships, awards, internship opportunities, and careers.  It also helps you connect with other young people who are passionate about 4-H Positive Youth Development and who want to continue to make a difference in their “club, community, country, and world.”

Membership

Collegiate 4-H is open to all college students who wish to support youth and the 4-H program. It is not necessary to have prior 4-H experience, only to have an interest in the 4-H ideals and in serving your community. Prior membership in the 4-H organization is not required.  If there is not a Collegiate 4-H Chapter at your local college or university, contact your local UF IFAS Extension Office to inquire about securing a faculty advisor.

Questions?

To find out more about the Collegiate 4-H Program at the University of Florida, contact Joshua Clay Hurdle, UF Collegiate 4-H President jchurdle@ufl.edu

To find out more about Collegiate 4-H in general, visit http://www.collegiate4h.org/ or contact Dr. Kate Fogarty, Ph.D. Youth Development Specialist, Florida 4-H kfogarty@ufl.edu

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Author: Heather Kent – hckent@ufl.edu

Heather Kent is the Regional Specialized 4-H Agent in the Northwest Extension District.

Heather Kent

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/05/27/collegiate-4-h-growing-trueleaders-beyond-high-school/

Panhandle Outdoors LIVE – Watershed School – Week’s Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve

Panhandle Outdoors LIVE – Watershed School – Week’s Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve

Weeks Bay.weeksbay.org

Fishermen fish the marshes of Weeks Bay while a pelican looks on. Photo: WeeksBay.org

Mobile Bay?… part of the Florida panhandle?… Really?…

Well… yes… during the colonial period “West Florida” extended west to the Biloxi area and besides, all western panhandlers know we are really “lower Alabama”; we hear it a million times a year… so YES, it’s part of the Florida panhandle! We’ll go with it.

The shallow, muddy, and productive waters of Mobile Bay as they pass the port city of Mobile AL. Photo: Auburn University

The shallow, muddy, and productive waters of Mobile Bay as they pass the port city of Mobile AL.
Photo: Auburn University

Approximately 35 miles long and 10 miles wide, Mobile Bay is one of the largest estuaries on the Gulf coast; draining close to 1/5th of the eastern United States.  This wide, shallow, and muddy bay supports a variety of fresh and brackish water ecosystems.  Wildlife from the Mississippi delta, the red hills of the Piedmont region, and the Florida panhandle all converge here making this one of the more biologically diverse areas in the country.  It was home to both Dr. E.O. Wilson and Dr. Archie Carr who deeply loved the area and it has been a hub for estuarine research for decades.  The rich abundance of wildlife supports commercial and recreational fishing and hunting as well as a growing ecotourism industry.  Though the shallow bay must be dredged to support it, the Port of Mobile in one of the busiest in the Gulf region.

 

Weeks Bay is a small tributary to this bay system. Fed by the Fish and Magnolia Rivers on the southeastern shore of Mobile Bay, Weeks Bay discharges into Bon Secour, which supports a commercial fishing business.  Lined with salt marshes, cypress swamps, and bogs, this area is great for wildlife viewing and fishing.  It is also the area of Mobile Bay that experiences the famous crab jubilees; where levels of low dissolved oxygen on the bottom of the bay force benthic animals – such as crabs and flounder – to shallow water seeking oxygen.  About 6,000 acres of this estuarine habitat is now part of NOAA’s National Estuarine Research Reserve system.  At the reserve there are interactive exhibits, trails, and pontoon boat rides to explore and appreciate this special place.

Crab jubilees occur along the eastern shore of Mobile Bay during very warm summer evenings. Photo: NOAA

Crab jubilees occur along the eastern shore of Mobile Bay during very warm summer evenings.
Photo: NOAA

What better place to learn about the estuaries of the Gulf coast! The Panhandle Outdoor LIVE program will conduct one of our four 2016 watershed schools at this reserve.  We will have lectures on estuarine ecology, the seafood industry in Mobile Bay – highlighting oyster farming, and on the mission of the Research Reserve itself.  We will also have a local outfitter lead a kayak/canoe trip through the estuary as well an interpretive nature hike at the reserve’s visitor center.  It will be set up as an overnight trip for those traveling and we will be staying at Camp Beckwith, which on Weeks Bay.  Registration for this trip will open at the end of February.  If you have questions about this watershed school you can contact Carrie Stevenson or Rick O’Connor at (850) 475-5230; or Chris Verlinde at (850) 623-3868.

A relaxing spot at Camp Beckwith on Weeks Bay. Photo: Camp Beckwith

A relaxing spot at Camp Beckwith on Weeks Bay.
Photo: Camp Beckwith

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Author: Rick O’Connor – roc1@ufl.edu

Sea Grant Extension Agent in Escambia County

Rick O’Connor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/02/05/panhandle-outdoors-live-watershed-school-weeks-bay-national-estuarine-research-reserve/

Packing a Healthy School Lunch

Healthy school lunch

Packing the kids’ lunches for school means you know which nutritious foods they are eating. Here are some budget-friendly, creative ideas to keep kids happy and healthy at lunchtime.

Make a “Smarter” Sandwich:

While some kids prefer the same thing every day, others may be okay with a slight switch to their sandwich.

  • Use different breads like 100% whole wheat tortilla wraps (choose wraps low in saturated and made with no hydrogenated oils) or 100% whole wheat pita pockets.
  • Besides lettuce, try shredded carrots or avocado slices with a turkey sandwich.
  • Buy blocks of low fat, low-sodium cheeses. You save money when you slice it yourself. Or use a cookie cutter to cut into fun shapes.
  • Instead of lunch meat, try a leftover grilled chicken sandwich with lettuce and tomato.

 

Love Those Leftovers:

Try using the leftovers from the family dinner for the next day’s lunch. Invest in a thermos to keep foods hot or cold until lunchtime.

  • Low-sodium tomato, vegetable or bean soups
  • Chili made with lean or extra lean ground turkey
  • Whole wheat spaghetti with low sodium tomato sauce
  • Low-sodium baked beans, bean casserole or beans & rice

 

Let Them Dunk:

Sometimes it is okay to let your kids play with their food, especially when they are getting extra nutrition.

  • Apple and pear slices to dip into low-fat plain yogurt mixed with peanut butter.
  • Carrot, celery and sweet pepper strips to dip into hummus, fresh salsa or homemade bean dip.
  • Whole grain crackers (choose crackers low in sodium and saturated fat and made without hydrogenated oils) to dunk into low-sodium vegetable or tomato soup.
  • Unsalted sunflower seeds, crushed whole wheat cereal and sliced banana to mix into low fat vanilla yogurt (no added sugars) to eat with a spoon like a sundae.

 

Get Them Involved:

While letting kids in the kitchen might mean a bigger mess, if they help pack their own lunch, they are more likely to eat it! On nights you have a bit more time, like a Sunday night, have them choose which piece of fruit or what type of whole grain bread they want and let them assemble their lunch. Make this a weekly routine – it’s another great way to spend family time together.

For more heart healthy lunch tips visit: www.heart.org

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Author: Melanie Taylor – metaylor@ufl.edu

Melanie Taylor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/09/11/packing-a-healthy-school-lunch-2/

Packing a Healthy School Lunch

Healthy School Lunch

Healthy School Lunch

Packing the kids’ lunches for school means you know which nutritious foods they are eating. Here are some budget-friendly, creative ideas to keep kids happy and healthy at lunchtime.

Make a “Smarter” Sandwich:

While some kids prefer the same thing every day, others may be okay with a slight switch to their sandwich.

  • Use different breads like 100% whole wheat tortilla wraps (choose wraps low in saturated and made with no hydrogenated oils) or 100% whole wheat pita pockets.
  • Besides lettuce, try shredded carrots or avocado slices with a turkey sandwich.
  • Buy blocks of low fat, low-sodium cheeses. You save money when you slice it yourself. Or use a cookie cutter to cut into fun shapes.
  • Instead of lunchmeat, try a leftover grilled chicken sandwich with lettuce and tomato.

Love Those Leftovers:

Try using the leftovers from the family dinner for the next day’s lunch. Invest in a thermos to keep foods hot or cold until lunchtime.

  • Low-sodium tomato, vegetable or bean soups
  • Chili made with lean or extra lean ground turkey
  • Whole wheat spaghetti with low sodium tomato sauce
  • Low-sodium baked beans, bean casserole or beans & rice

Let Them Dunk:

Sometimes it is okay to let your kids play with their food, especially when they are getting extra nutrition.

  • Apple and pear slices to dip into low-fat plain yogurt mixed with peanut butter.
  • Carrot, celery and sweet pepper strips to dip into hummus, fresh salsa or homemade bean dip.
  • Whole grain crackers (choose crackers low in sodium and saturated fat and made without hydrogenated oils) to dunk into low-sodium vegetable or tomato soup.
  • Unsalted sunflower seeds, crushed whole wheat cereal and sliced banana to mix into low fat vanilla yogurt (no added sugars) to eat with a spoon like a sundae.

Get Them Involved:

While letting kids in the kitchen might mean a bigger mess, if they help pack their own lunch, they are more likely to eat it! On nights you have a bit more time, like a Sunday night, have them choose which piece of fruit or what type of whole grain bread they want and let them assemble their lunch. Make this a weekly routine – it’s another great way to spend family time together.

For more heart healthy lunch tips visit: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/

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Author: Melanie Taylor – metaylor@ufl.edu

Melanie Taylor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/08/29/packing-a-healthy-school-lunch/

How to Address Bullying at School

LyraEDISServletResearch shows that 20-40% of children are bullied in some way. Whether bullying is verbal, physical, or done online it is a very real problem that can happen in any school, even among young school-age children. A safe and secure environment is key for the Essential Element of Belonging, one of the foundations of 4-H positive youth development.  Being educated about what bullying is, knowing how to spot the signs of bullying, and learning what to do if your child is affected by this behavior can help parents address bullying if and when it happens.

How to recognize bullying- Bullying can take several forms. It can be observable or secretive behavior.

Observable Behavior: Secretive Behavior:
  • Intimidation and threats.
  • Name calling, insults, and comments about disability, gender, and race.
  • Teasing about personal characteristics or sexual harassment.
  • Physical assault, tripping, hitting, pinching and other physical abuse.
  • Destruction of property, demanding money or other possessions.

 

  • Rejecting, excluding, and isolating victims from others.
  • Spreading rumors and other public humiliation.
  • Manipulating friends and relationships, passive aggression.
  • Passing damaging notes or posting threatening or damaging emails or web material.
  • Blackmailing, harassment, and dangerous dares.

Left unaddressed, bullying can cause depression and lasting psychological damage to the victim. It can result in poor attendance or psychosomatic illnesses. Violence can escalate into serious property damage, and injuries to students and adults. Bullying at school also affects others who are not involved directly but who simply witness or are aware of mistreatment of another student. These students may suffer from fear and concern about their schoolmate who is targeted. They may feel guilt but also may fear the bully so much that they do nothing to help. Worse, they may become offenders themselves because they fear the perpetrator will target them.

Bullies tend to seek out victims who:

  • Are unable to defend themselves.
  • Have little social support, or few friends.
  • Are not involved in extra-curricular activities.
  • Are low achievers in academics or sports.
  • Are not popular or focused on by adults in the school.
  • Have less developed social skills.
  • Have difficulty communicating.
  • Have low-self esteem or are unassertive.

Know the warning signs of bullying- It is not uncommon for a child who may be the victim of school bullying to be reluctant to tell his or her parents out of shame or fear. Children fear that the adults will not be able to help them or that they may make the situation worse. They may also believe the bully will retaliate against them or their friends. If you suspect that your child may be a target of school bullying, look for these signs:

  • Sadness, anxiety, difficulty sleeping or eating, temper or emotional outbursts, picking on younger siblings.
  • Unexplained bruises, cuts, or damaged clothing or school supplies.
  • Fear of school, not wanting to go to school, or sudden drop in school performance.
  • Dislike of recess and avoidance of unsupervised school areas such as the bathroom, despite the need to go.
  • Withdrawal from friends and family, fear of parent communication with teachers.
  • Complaints of physical problems without a medical reason.
  • Any abrupt behavior change or sudden lack of self-esteem.

What Parents Can Do to Prevent and Stop Bullying –Parents are the key to preventing and stopping bullying. Here are a few ways that parents can help respond to bullying.

Stay connected with your child. The more you know about your child’s friends and their interactions with classmates and peers, the more likely you are to spot any changes in their social circle. Talk with your child every day about specifics at school and extracurricular activities such as what the best or worst part of their day was. This is also an important way to establish good communication with your child so that they can come to you when they have a problem.

Explain to your child what bullying is. Children understand that hitting or pushing another child is wrong, but you can also explain that other forms of bullying, such as excluding or ignoring someone, can also be hurtful.

Tell children what to do in case they experience or witnesses bullying. Talk with your child about the basics of what to do if they encounter hurtful behavior directed toward them or someone else. Tell your child to alert a teacher right away if they see or are subject to bullying behavior, and that it is important to stop someone from getting hurt.

Teach a child the importance of empathy. Research has shown that emotional intelligence and empathy skills may be even more important for success in life than intellectual intelligence. A child who is able to understand what it may feel like to be bullied and can understand and regulate their own emotions is less likely to engage in that kind of behavior.

Set a good example. Do you ever make fun of other people or gossip about others in front of your child? Have you ever spoken rudely to a waiter at a restaurant or to a store clerk in a shop? Even if you think your children are not listening or observing your behavior, the fact is that kids learn a lot about how to conduct themselves from watching their parents.

Talk to your school about what programs are being used to deter bullying. If you suspect that your child may be the victim of school bullying, talk to your child’s teacher about your concerns. Ask the teacher to watch out for problems and notify the school principal and counselor about your concerns as well.

As parents and volunteers, it’s our job to provide youth with a safe environment where they can learn and grow. For more resources about bullying, contact your local UF IFAS Extension Office, or download some of our other resources:

Talking About Bullying

Bullying and Children with Disabilities

Bullying Related to Lack of Time with Dad

Cyberbullying

Outcomes of Bullying

Parent’s Role in Bullying Behavior

Teens and Sexual Harassment: Making a Difference

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Author: mismith – mismith@ufl.edu

mismith

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/08/28/how-to-address-bullying-at-school/

4-H Opportunities at School

4-H embryology is a great way for school youth to learn about STEM and agriculture

4-H embryology is a great way for school youth to learn about STEM and agriculture

For more than 100 years, 4-H clubs have been (and still are) the backbone of our youth development program. But did you know that 4-H also provides opportunities for youth to participate in programs during and after school? Not all youth have access to transportation to and from club meetings. 4-H school programs are a great way for those youth to glean the benefits of 4-H and to learn about other opportunities to be involved longer term.

Some examples of 4-H School programs offered in the 4-H Panhandle include:

Sometimes school programs such as 4-H Embryology or 4-H Tropicana Public Speaking are taught by teachers, using 4-H curriculum and resources with support from the 4-H Extension Agent. Other programs are coordinated with a team of volunteers and 4-H staff (such as 4-H Ag Awareness or Ag Literacy Week). County Extension offices offer training, curriculum, and equipment for teachers and volunteers interested in leading 4-H programs at local schools. In addition, these programs receive support from extension agents and UF IFAS specialists with subject matter expertise, so you can be sure that youth are receiving the most up to date, non-biased information available.

If you have skills that you would like to share with the next generation, consider partnering with your local school and 4-H program. To find out which opportunities are available in your area, contact your local UF IFAS County Extension Office or visit http://florida4h.org/volunteers.

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Author: Heather Kent – hckent@ufl.edu

Heather Kent is the Regional Specialized 4-H Agent in the Northwest Extension District.

Heather Kent

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/08/21/4-h-opportunities-at-school/

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