Tag Archive: Small

Small Cockroaches Flying Into Homes

Figure 1. Adult female Asian cockroach, Blattella asahinai Mizukubo, carrying an egg case (ootheca). Photograph by R.W. Baldwin, University of Florida.

The Asian cockroach was first identified as a newly introduced species in the U.S. in Lakeland, Florida in 1986. I started seeing this small cockroach in our area about 17 or 18 years ago. They’ve done well recently with the rains and their numbers are probably higher now as a result. They prefer warm, wet conditions. Populations of 30,000 to 250,000 per acre are reported in some literature.

They are mostly active at night, hiding in mulched landscape beds and lawns during the day. It’s not uncommon to disturb them as you walk through or hand water mulched plant beds during daytime hours. When doing so, the little roaches, which may be mistaken for small moths, quickly fly as they are disturbed.

Asian cockroaches occasionally fly into homes or automobiles at night, attracted to lights. Thankfully, they don’t live long indoors, though.

Control is difficult. Because they can fly 120 feet or more in a single flight, large areas around a home require treatment. And cockroaches in surrounding untreated areas (lawns, mulched plant beds and nearby woods) may result in re-infestation.

Traditional indoor treatments are ineffective because Asian roaches don’t typically live and breed indoors. The best control has been attained by using insecticide baits (labeled for roach control) in infested areas outdoors. Always follow the label directions and precautions when using any pesticide, including insecticides.

Sodium vapor lamps for outdoor lighting and yellow incandescent bulbs for porch lighting are less attractive to the flying adults.

Both the German and Asian cockroach adults are about 5/8 inch long and are brown to dark brown in color with two darker parallel bands running lengthwise just behind their head. But unlike the German cockroach, the Asian cockroach is a strong flier. Even though German cockroaches have wings, they do not fly. Also, unlike the German cockroach, which prefers to live indoors and is a major household pest as a result, the Asian cockroach prefers to live outside.

For more info on this roach species, visit the below UF/IFAS Extension EDIS website.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in277

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Author: Larry Williams – llw5479@ufl.edu

Larry Williams is the County Extension Director and Residential Horticulture Agent for the UF/IFAS Extension Office in Okaloosa County.

Larry Williams

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/07/22/small-cockroaches-flying-into-homes/

Gulf Coast Small Farms Field Day – November 17

Gulf Coast Small Farms Field Day – November 17

fall-2016-small-farms-field-day

 

Join us on Thursday, November 17th at the West Florida Research and Education Center (4253 Experiment Drive, Jay) for the Fall Gulf Coast Small Farms Field Day. Registration starts at 7:45, with informational sessions and tours starting at 8:00 am.

The following topics will be covered include:

  • Using Protected Agriculture and Hydroponics to Meet Demand for High Value Specialty Crops—Bob Hochmuth, SVREC

  • FDACS Best Management Practices for Vegetable Producers—David Cambron, FDACS

  • BMPs—Nutrient Management, Water Protection, IPM

  • High Tunnel trials—Kale, Swiss Chard, & Carrots

  • Marketing to niche markets

 

If you need more information, or to RSVP, please contact Blake Thaxton at 850-623-3868

 

Full Earth Farm - Carrots in Soil Profile

 

 

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Author: Libbie Johnson – libbiej@ufl.edu

Agriculture agent at UF IFAS Escambia County Extension.
http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/

Libbie Johnson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/10/29/gulf-coast-small-farms-field-day-november-17/

Okaloosa Veteran & Small Farmer Workshop July 21

Okaloosa Veteran Workshop cardLaunching and sustaining a successful business takes a wealth of resources.  Farm Credit of Northwest Florida and Okaloosa Extension are teaming up to provide a local workshop for veterans interested in starting a farm business, beginning farmers, or small farmers looking for help to expand existing operations!   Participants will meet local resource people that utilize a wide range of programs with funding and technical assistance targeted for veterans and small farms.

July 21, 2016
9 am – 2 pm

Okaloosa County Extension Office
3098 Airport Rd.
Crestview, Florida 32359

RSVP by 7/14/16

Online registration: http://www.farmcredit-fl.com/workshop.aspx

Call in registration:  850-526-4910

 

Okaloosa Veteran Workshop sponsor

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Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/06/25/okaloosa-veteran-small-farmer-workshop-july-21/

Red Hills Small Farm Alliance Recognized by National Farm Credit for Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Red Hills Small Farm Alliance Recognized by National Farm Credit for Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Buy your plants through the Red Hills Online Market. Photo by Cassie Dillman.

Customers can buy plants through the Red Hills Online Market. Photo by Cassie Dillman.

Announced at the National Ag Day in Washington, D.C., the Red Hills Small Farm Alliance (RHSFA) became one of the Top 100 Honorees recognized by the National Farm Credit System for Entrepreneurship and Innovation. The Farm Credit 100 Fresh Perspectives honorees include leaders and visionaries from across the country. The RHSFA was selected by a distinguished panel of agricultural industry representatives from a pool of 1,100 nominees. The farms and organizations highlighted through this program are creating the future of agriculture and rural America through their dedication and innovation.

RHSFA was formed by east Florida Panhandle farmers, Louise Divine of Turkey Hill Farm and Katie Harris of Full Earth Farm, in 2010 as a means to strengthen our small farm community and expand our local food market to more citizens within our region. The RHSFA allows farmers – who may otherwise only see one another as competitors – to work together, share insights and ideas, and mentor new farmers, as they promote local agriculture.

Red Hills Online Market sign. Photo by Cassie Dillman.

Red Hills Online Market sign. Photo by Cassie Dillman.

One of the innovative components of the RHSFA that contributed to this agricultural distinction is the Red Hills Online Market (RHO Market). The RHO Market, which opened in 2011, allows farmers and producers within 100 miles of Tallahassee to join the RHSFA and apply to list their products on the online platform. It also allows customers the convenience of ordering and paying for local produce online, with the ability to pick up their orders at one of several convenient locations each week or have them delivered directly to their doorsteps for a small fee.

The RHO Market gives local farmers the ability to harvest only what has been sold and the flexibility to deliver the produce to one distribution center, freeing them from hours at a traditional farmers’ market. Increasing efficiency for farmers and convenience for customers has allowed the RHO Market to grow 30 percent annually, with over 400 customers purchasing from 41 local farmers. In 2015, this earned RHSFA farmers $ 85,000.

Alliance Co-director Katie Harris, as quoted in the online description of the Farm Credit 100 Honorees, said, “I hope to achieve steady growth in the farming community, whether that be fostering new farmers or helping existing farms expand. I hope to do this through providing a reliable and innovative economic outlet for farmers that is convenient to both farmers and consumers alike.”

The RHSFA also offers educational opportunities, including the Seven Days of Local Delights. This is a week-long campaign event held annually, directly following the New Leaf Farm Tour, offering over 20 workshops about supporting, using, and growing local food.

Red Hills Online Market vegetable collage. Photo by Cassie Dillman.

Local vegetables. Photos by Cassie Dillman.

As the RHSFA and RHO Market expand, so does the appreciation for locally grown produce. This growth contributes to the ability of farmers to increase production, encourages new farmers to begin farming, and also connects people to the food they are consuming and to local agricultural production.

According to a Civic Economics Andersonville Study of Retail Economics, for every $ 100 that is spent at an independent business, $ 68 returns to the local economy. By comparison, only $ 43 returns to the local economy when spent at a national chain. This means that if every family spent $ 10 per month at locally owned businesses instead of national chains, over $ 9.3 billion would return directly to local economies.

Buying local will also keep the Florida Panhandle unique, support community groups, reduce environmental impacts, create jobs, and will encourage local prosperity overall. For 2011-2012, the total value of local foods purchased in Florida was estimated at $ 8.3 billion, generating an estimated 183,625 jobs, $ 6.5 billion in labor income, and $ 10.5 billion in value-added contributions to the Gross State Product.

Visit the Red Hills Small Farm Alliance website at to find out more about the alliance, or the farmers and the Red Hills Online Farmers Market to see innovative way this group is marketing locally produced foods.

For more information on buying local produce, please see the following publications:

 

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Author: Molly Jameson – mjameson@ufl.edu

Molly Jameson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/04/16/red-hills-small-farm-alliance-recognized-by-national-farm-credit-for-entrepreneurship-and-innovation/

Small Steps Are the Key to Healthy Change

drinking waterOliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. once said, “The greatest thing in the world is not so much where we are, but in which direction we are moving.” That saying holds true when it comes to our health and our finances.

Health and personal financial issues affect millions of Americans. We struggle with epidemic obesity rates, over 79 million Americans have “pre-diabetes”, debt and bankruptcy filings remain high and millions of Americans live on the “financial edge” with less than the recommended three months’ emergency fund set aside for the future. Problems that develop gradually soon become overwhelming.

Many of us, when faced with the need to change, see our problems as unbeatable and “freeze” instead of moving forward. It is true that there is no easy way to lose weight, gain wealth or become debt-free. Even drastic fixes like weight loss surgery or bankruptcy come with huge risks. So, what is the secret?

According to Former HHS Secretary Tommy G.Thompson, small steps are the key! Mr. Thompson stated, “Consumers don’t need to go to extremes – such as joining a gym or taking part in the latest diet plan – to make improvements to their health. But they do need to get active and eat healthier.” No step is too small to get started and you can never be too early or too late. Examples might include walking during your lunch break, cutting out 100 calories a day, saving the change you accumulate each day or tracking your spending for a month. Anything you do daily over a period of time will soon become a habit, or an “automated” behavior. When your healthy behaviors become automated – no matter how small – you’ve just taken a step toward physical and/or financial wellness.

In the end, your health is in your hands. Set realistic goals, take small steps to reach them, learn from the obstacles and believe that you can achieve. And remember, “In the end, the only people who fail are those who do not try.” – David Viscott

 

Adapted from Small Steps to Health and Wealth, B. O’Neill and K. Ensle, 2013.

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Author: Ginny Hinton – ghinton@ufl.edu

Santa Rosa County Extension Agent with UF/IFAS. Focus areas include nutrition, food safety, injury prevention, and healthy families. Bachelor’s degree in Social Work from University of West Florida. Master’s degree in Public Health/Health Education from University of South Florida.
http://santarosa.ifas.ufl.edu

Ginny Hinton

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/04/01/small-steps-are-the-key-to-healthy-change/

Small Farm Strawberry Field Day – April 18

Small Farm Strawberry Field Day – April 18

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Join us for the 2016 Gulf Cost Small Farms Strawberry Field Day on April 18th at the West Florida Research and Education Center in Jay, FL.

Date: April 18th, 2016
Location: WFREC, 4253 Experiment Dr., Hwy. 182 Jay, FL 32565

TOPICS FOR THE DAY:

  • Strawberry Variety Trial
  • Strawberry Production in a high tunnel versus Field Production
  • Proactive Management of Spring/Summer Crops
  • Selling your crop through healthy food preparation
  • Best Management Practices for vegetable farms

For more information, contact
Blake Thaxton
bthaxton@ufl.edu • 850.623.3868

Libbie Johnson
libbiej@ufl.edu • 850.475.5230

Jennifer Bearden
bearden@ufl.edu • 850.689.5858
IFASExt2013Gulf-Coast-Small-Farm-logo

 

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Author: Blake Thaxton – bthaxton@ufl.edu

Santa Rosa County Extension Agent I, Commercial Horticulture

Blake Thaxton

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/03/19/small-farm-strawberry-field-day-april-18/

Veteran & Small Farmer Seminar February 16

Farm CreditPlease Join Us!

February 16, 2016
9 am – 2 pm

Jefferson County Country Club
648 Boston Hwy – Monticello, Florida 32344

Launching and sustaining a successful business takes a wealth of resources.  Attend this local workshop to become more aware of the resources and assistance available to veteran and small farmers.

Workshop Agenda

  • 9:00 AM Pledge of Allegiance/National Anthem

  • 9:05 AM Welcome:  Congresswoman Gwen Graham

  • 9:20 AM Introduction

  • 9:25 AM USDA-Natural Resource Conservation Service

  • 9:40 AM USDA-Farm Service Agency

  • 9:55 AM UF-IFAS Extension Service

  • 10:10 AM Break

  • 10:25 AM UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center

  • 10:50 AM FAMU Extension Service

  • 11:15 AM Farm Bureau

  • 11:30 AM Farm Credit of Northwest Florida

  • 12:00 PM Lunch

  • 12:45 PM Florida Small Business Development Center

  • 1:30 PM Homegrown By Heroes

  • 2:00 PM Adjourn

RSVP by 2/9/16

http://www.farmcredit-fl.com/workshop.aspx or 850-526-4910

 

Farm Credit of Northwest Florida
P.O. Box 7000
Marianna, FL 32447
www.farmcredit-fl.com

 

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Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/01/30/veteran-small-farmer-seminar-february-16/

Fall Small Farm Field Day November 19

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Author: Blake Thaxton – bthaxton@ufl.edu

Santa Rosa County Extension Agent I, Commercial Horticulture

Blake Thaxton

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/11/07/fall-small-farm-field-day-november-19/

Veterans & Small Farmer Workshop November 6

Veteran Farmer WorkshopNovember 6, 2015

9 am – 2 pm Central Time
Jackson County Extension Office
2741 Penn Ave Marianna, Florida 32448

Launching and sustaining a successful business takes a wealth of resources.  Attend this local workshop to become more aware of the resources and assistance available to veterans interested in starting a farming operation, as well as to existing small farm operations.

Workshop Agenda

9:00 AM Pledge of Allegiance/National Anthem: Chipola President’s Ensemble

9:05 AM Welcome:  Congresswoman Gwen Graham

9:20 AM Introduction:  Dave Cambron

9:25 AM USDA-Natural Resource Conservation Service:  Jeff Norville

9:25 AM USDA-Farm Service Agency:  Shelly Sale

10:55 AM UF-IFAS Extension Service:  Doug Mayo & Matt Lollar

10:25 AM UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center:  Josh Freeman

10:40 AM Break

10:50 AM FAMU Extension Service:  Angela-McKenzie Jakes

11:15 AM Farm Bureau:  Allen Scheffer, Tommy Young and Trevor Tyer

11:30 AM Farm Credit of Northwest Florida:  Stephen Roach

12:00 PM Lunch

12:45 PM Florida Small Business Development Center:  Len Eichler

1:30 PM Homegrown By Heroes:  Lesia Andrews

2:00 PM Adjourn

RSVP by 11/1/15 to be entered for a door prize drawing
Online Registration:  http://www.farmcredit-fl.com/workshop.aspx
Call in registration:  850-526-4910

 

For more information, contact:

Lesia Andrews
Farm Credit of Northwest Florida

P.O. Box 7000
Marianna, FL 32447
www.farmcredit-fl.com

 

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Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/10/31/veterans-small-farmer-workshop-november-6/

Easy Roses for Small Spaces

Easy Roses for Small Spaces

Peach Drift Rose blooming in Quincy at the UF/IFAS NFREC

Peach Drift® Rose blooming in Quincy at the UF/IFAS NFREC Photo: J.McConnell, UF/IFAS

Growing roses in the South can have challenges and many gardeners think that they are just too high maintenance to plant. Plant developers are aware of this opinion and have worked to develop low maintenance roses that can make a novice gardener look like a pro.

The trend in horticulture is to develop and release plant series where closely related plants have similar characteristics but offer some diversity such as different flower color and size. A new series that is performing well in North Florida is Drift® Groundcover Roses. Available with flower colors ranging from white, yellow, pink, apricot, to red. All exhibit a low growing habit and will remain under three feet tall and spread up to four feet wide. Flowers are born in dense clusters for most of the year, only taking a break in the winter months.

Although not completely disease free, these roses do show resistance to rust, powdery mildew, and black spot which are common problems with roses. Deadheading is not necessary, but can be done to increase bloom and keep plants looking tidy. One of the best characteristics of the Drift® Groundcover Rose series is that they don’t get very tall, so they fit in small spaces. If you are looking for incredible color in a sunny site with limited space give this series a try.

Although low maintenance, roses do still require some attention, for more information read Growing Roses in Florida.

 

Coral Drift® Rose Peach Drift® Rose Coral Drift® Rose Coral Drift® Rose Coral Drift® Rose Peach Drift® Rose Peach Drift Rose blooming in Quincy at the UF/IFAS NFREC

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Author: Julie McConnell – juliebmcconnell@ufl.edu

UF/IFAS Bay County Horticulture Extension Agent I

Julie McConnell

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/05/06/easy-roses-for-small-spaces/

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