Tag Archive: Southeast

Friday Feature: Southeast Hay Contest Video

Friday Feature:  Southeast Hay Contest Video

The Southeast Hay Contest was started 14 years ago to showcase the excellent quality hay that is produced in the South.  If you take pride in producing high quality hay, this is an opportunity to see how the best hay you produce compares to other farms in the region.  This week’s featured video was produced by Massey Ferguson, the major sponsor of the contest, to help spread the word about the Southeast Hay Contest.

It is not too late to enter this year’s contest.  Contact your local County Extension Office and make an appointment to have your hay or balage tested.  Entries must be received by the UGA Forage Lab by 5:00 PM Thursday, September 21, 2017.  Entries must be signed by your local county agent to verify production.  Rules and entry information are all available on the SE Hay Contest website:  http://blog.caes.uga.edu/sehaycontest/  Winners will be recognized at the 40th annual Sunbelt Ag Expo, in Moultrie, GA on Tuesday, October 17th.

Hay and baleage samples will compete in the following seven categories:

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If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/08/friday-feature-southeast-hay-contest-video/

2016 Southeast Hay Contest open for Entry

2016 Southeast Hay Contest open for Entry

SE Hay Contest graphicThere are many economic reasons why southeastern forage growers have increased the quality of the forage they produce (great demand for their products, need for efficiency due to high input costs, etc.). But, the keys to success have been timely management, improved forage varieties, advanced harvest equipment, and related technologies that have come to the market over the last 10 years.  It is hard to recall a more exciting time in the hay and forage industry!  If you do a good job producing high quality forage, why not send in samples for analysis to prove it to your customers?  Who knows, you may have produced some of the best hay or baleage in the Southeast in 2016?

Since 2004, the Southeastern Hay Contest has been spotlighting high quality hay and baleage produced in the Southeast. The SE Hay Contest is run in conjunction with the Sunbelt Ag Expo, with the winners announced each year on the first day of the Expo. Our goal is to demonstrate the potential to produce high quality hay and baleage, showcase the management abilities of our SE growers, and highlight the technology and equipment that make it all possible!

Building on the success of the first 11 years of this annual event, we are excited to announce that Massey Ferguson will be the title sponsor for the 2016 SE Hay Contest! They will be providing the Grand Prize of a new Massey Ferguson RK Series rotary rake or new DM Series Professional disc mower for the 2017 hay production season AND a $ 1000 cash prize!  Each of the 9 categories will also be sponsored by more of our industry partners (see our sponsors page). Their sponsorship will provide cash awards to the top 3 places in each category (1st prize $ 125, 2nd prize $ 75, and 3rd prize $ 50)!

So, is your hay and baleage the class of the field? Think you can vie for a winning combination? If so, utilize the links below and start sending in your best forage samples today! The deadline for entry into the SE Hay Contest is 5 p.m. on Monday, September 22, 2016.  Even if you don’t take home a cash prize, you will still have the lab test results from each sample to share with your customers.  It is a win:win situation.

While you’re at it, take time to advertise your high quality forage in the 2016 SE Hay Directory. The SE Hay Directory seeks to connect our high quality forage producers with buyers who value quality tested forages. Read more about the SE Hay Directory by downloading the rules and entry forms.

SE Hay Contest Website

2016 SE Hay Contest Rules and Entry Form

 

SE Hay Contest Logos

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/05/14/2016-southeast-hay-contest-open-for-entry/

Two Panhandle Farms Recognized through the 2015 Southeast Hay Contest

Two Panhandle Farms Recognized through the 2015 Southeast Hay Contest

The Southeastern Hay Contest winners were announced this week.  There were 375 total entries in the contest this year (185 in 2014).  Hay and baleage samples were ranked based on their Relative Forage Quality score (RFQ).  The contest was divided into seven categorizes:  warm season perennial grass hay (bermudagrass, bahiagrass),alfalfa hay, perennial peanut hay, perennial cool season grass (tall fescue, orchardgrass, etc.) hay, mixed and annual grass hay, grass baleage, and legume baleage.

Winners were announced during the opening ceremonies at the Sunbelt Ag Expo on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2015. In each of the seven categories, the highest three entries in terms of relative forage quality (RFQ) received cash prizes. First place received $ 125, second place $ 75, and third place $ 50. The highest overall RFQ score received the use of a new Massey Ferguson DM RK Series rotary rake for the 2016 hay production season, plus $ 1000 in cash!  Top honors in the warm season perennial grass hay category also receive the use of a new Massey Ferguson DM Series Professional disc mower for the 2016 hay production season!

McGee Ranch in Idalou, TX was the 2015 overall SE Hay Contest winner with an entry of extremely high quality alfalfa hay that maxed out the RFQ index at 300.

McGee Ranch in Idalou, TX was the 2015 overall SE Hay Contest winner with an entry of extremely high quality alfalfa hay that maxed out the RFQ index at 300.

The 2015 overall contest winner was McGee Ranch, Idalou, TX with an RFQ score over 300, which was from some extremely high quality alfalfa hay.  The winner of the warm season perennial grass hay category was Yon Family Farms from Ridge Spring,SC who had an RFQ of 161.

Yon Family Farms, Ridge Spring, SC was the winner of the warm season perennial grass hay category with a Coastal Bermudagrass hay entry with an RFQ score of 161.

Yon Family Farms, Ridge Spring, SC was the winner of the warm season perennial grass hay category with a Coastal Bermudagrass hay entry with an RFQ score of 161.

The Florida Panhandle was represented well by two perennial peanut hay operations.  Justin Williams, Bonifay had the top Perennial Peanut Hay entry with an RFQ score of 179.  Steve & Seth Basford, Grand Ridge had the 2nd place Perennial Peanut Hay entry with an RFQ score of 157.

Justin Williams, Bonifay had the top Perennial Peanut Hay entry with an RFQ score of 179.

Justin Williams, Bonifay had the top Perennial Peanut Hay entry with an RFQ score of 179.

Steve Basford 2015 Perennial peanut hay 2nd place

Steve & Seth Basford, Grand Ridge had the 2nd place Perennial Peanut Hay entry with an RFQ score of 157.

SE Hay Contest header2015 Southeast Hay Contest Winners

2015 SE Hay Contest Winners

Weather is always a major limiting factor when attempting to produce high quality forage. This year, dry conditions in the middle part of the growing season caused drought to be a major limitation for many producers. Drought stress increased the incidence of high nitrate levels in the forage in 2015. In fact, 11.5% of the samples submitted to the contest were disqualified because nitrates were greater than 5000 ppm. Still, the forage quality this year was very high. The average relative forage quality (RFQ) was on par with or equal to the highest values in the Contest’s 11-year history. Good management can make a remarkable improvement in forage quality in both favorable and unfavorable weather conditions.

What is Relative Forage Quality (RFQ)?

In the past, hay quality prediction equations were based on the fiber concentration of the hay crop. However, forage crops can have similar fiber content yet have very different digestibility. For instance, Tifton 85 bermudagrass often has a higher fiber concentration than other bermudagrass varieties, yet it is more digestible. This improved digestibility results in enhanced animal performance, but is not reflected using traditional forage testing methods. The Relative Forage Quality index was developed by the University of Florida and the University of Wisconsin to predict the fiber digestibility and animal intake of harvested crops.  Since 2003, hundreds of warm season samples have been used to refine the RFQ equation for bermudagrass and other warm season forages. Currently, all forage sample results from the UGA Feed and Forage Testing Lab in Athens contain an estimate of Relative Forage Quality. This value is a single, easy to interpret number that improves producer understanding of a forage’s nutritive quality and helps in establishing a fair market value for the product.

How can Relative Forage Quality help you?

Relative Forage Quality allows hay producers to easily categorize and price hay lots based on relative quality. Producers can purchase hay lots depending on its end use. For example, there is little need to feed high-quality hay to livestock that could easily utilize poorer quality forage. Hay with an RFQ of 115-130 can be fed to maintain beef cow-calf pairs, hay with an RFQ of 125-150 is adequate for stocker cattle or young growing replacement heifers, and hay with an RFQ of 140-160 is suitable for dairy cattle in the first three months of lactation. It is also easy to see that Relative Forage Quality could provide the framework for a quality hay marketing system. For example, hay with a RFQ of 155 could conceptually be labeled “premium” hay, while hay with an RFQ of 105 could be labeled “fair.”  This simple system could allow producers to price hay consistently and fairly across harvest maturity, fertilization regimes, or plant species (i.e. bermudagrass, bahiagrass, perennial peanut, or tall fescue).

Source:  Dennis Hancock, UGA Extension Forage Specialist and SE Hay Contest Chairman

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Jackson County Extension Director, Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/10/24/two-panhandle-farms-recognized-through-the-2015-southeast-hay-contest/

Southeast Drying Out with More Hot & Dry Weather on the Way

High PressureDavid Zierden, State Climatologist
Article posted on Southeast Innovative Farming Team June 19, 2015

Current Conditions – According to the last U.S. Drought Monitor, drought is starting to creep back into the Southeast. The latest map released on June 18 designates a large portion of South Georgia and North Florida as D0, or “abnormally dry”.  Some Southeast Georgia Counties and Northeast Florida is classified as in “moderate drought”.6-16-15 SE Drough MonitorRainfall over the last 30 days has lagged behind over much of South Georgia and North Florida, with only spotty coverage from the normal afternoon thundershowers.  Areas centered around Tallahassee and Jefferson County, FL and Northeast Florida have 30-day deficits approaching 4 inches or more.

The reason is that the Southeast has been dominated by a deep-layer high pressure ridge that has lead to temperatures in the upper 90′s and suppressed thunderstorm formation. This same high pressure system was responsible for blocking any moisture from tropical storm Bill from affecting the region.  Thundershower activity in the past few days has been limited to near the Gulf Coast where the seabreeze initiated formation.  Areas further from the coast remained mostly dry.

Mid-Range Forecast – Unfortunately, this pattern of high pressure ridging will stick with us for the next 7-14 days.  The National Weather Service office in Tallahassee is forecasting high temperatures in the upper 90′s for the entire next week and rain chances only 20%-30% each day.  As we have seen for the last week or more, some locations may get lucky with a well-placed thundershower, while others nearby remain dry.  Coverage will generally decrease  further inland from the coast and they do not expect any widespread events.  Tallahassee NWS Office

Mid-range weather models from both NOAA and the European Center forecast the ridge to grow even stronger over the Southern United States next week and bring more scorching temperatures.  This is not good news for area growers, as the high temperatures stress crops and lead to much higher evapotranspiration rates that deplete soils of moisture.  Also, higher daytime temperatures usually go hand-in-hand with less rainfall and thunderstorm activity during the summer in the Southeast.  Below is NOAA’s 8-14 day outlook showing the hotter and drier forecast for the region.

814prcp.new_814temp.new_

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Looking Further Ahead – 
 El Nino has continued to gain strength in the Pacific Ocean and now is close to being considered a “Strong” event.  The connection to the atmosphere, circulation and weather patterns is also will-established right now, as El Nino helped direct moisture from the tropical Pacific to Texas and Oklahoma, where they had widespread flooding and record rainfall in the month of May.  Looking closer to home, a strong El Nino is not good news for the Southeast.  A composite analysis from similar early starting and strong El Nino events shows that the Southeast often responds with a dry late summer (July – August).  NOAA’s latest 3-month seasonal outlook was released yesterday (June 18) and is consistent with the idea of less rainfall over this region.

Climate Precip3 Month Precip

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Take Home Message – Hot and dry conditions as we approach the most critical point in the growing season is not something anyone wants to hear.  Unfortunately, it is looking more and more like a reality that has to be dealt with.  The forecast can change and weather prediction has very little skill in the two-four week horizon.  Tropical storms or disturbances are also a wildcard that cannot be predicted or anticipated at this time, but could impact the region as hurricane season heats up.  But for right now, hot and drier is a good possibility for the next two weeks or so and it could persist well into the second half of summer.

 

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/06/19/southeast-drying-out-with-more-hot-dry-weather-on-the-way/

Federal Reserve Report Optimistic About Southeast Agriculture

Ag Blog - FRB noteThe U.S. Federal Reserve Banks are responsible for the currency used domestically.  They also issues a report eight times annually on the current economic conditions in the collective Federal Reserve Districts.

Known as the Beige Book, this publication is based on anecdotal information from Bank and Branch directors and interviews with key business contacts, economists, market experts, and other sources.

Major economic sectors are reported as a national summary by individual Federal Reserve Districts. Florida is included in the Atlanta, Georgia report, the latest of which was released June 3, 2015.

National Summary of the twelve Federal Reserve Districts suggest overall economic activity expanded during the reporting period from early April to late May. Compared to the previous report, the pace of growth held steady in the Atlanta District.

The agricultural sector improved as significant rainfall alleviated the dry spell, and improved growing conditions in several districts. However, drought conditions persisted in the San Francisco District and the outbreak of the avian flu severely impacted poultry producers in the Chicago and Minneapolis Districts.

The Atlanta report indicated significant rain alleviated drought conditions in much of the District. Florida’s orange forecast was below both the previous month’s reading and last year’s production level, primarily due to citrus greening.  Some Alabama producers reported planting less cotton in favor of crops commanding better prices or crops that cost less to produce (such as soybeans and peanuts). By mid-May, soybean planting was ahead of the five-year average in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee. Cotton planting in Alabama and Georgia and rice planting in Louisiana and Mississippi were short of their five-year averages.

Read the summary or the full Report: 

Federal Reserve Beige Book – June 3, 2015

 

The next report is due for release July 15, 2015.

PG

Author: Les Harrison – harrisog@ufl.edu

Les Harrison is the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Director, Agriculture and Natural Resources. He works with small and medium sized producers in the Big Bend region of north Florida on a wide range of topics. He has a Master’s of Science Degree in Agricultural Economics from Auburn University and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Journalism from the University of Florida.

Les Harrison

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/06/13/federal-reserve-report-optimistic-about-southeast-agriculture/

New Sponsorship Adds Major Boost to Southeast Hay Contest

15 SE HAY contest graphicSince 2004, the Southeastern Hay Contest has been spotlighting high quality hay and baleage production in the Southeast. The SE Hay Contest is run in conjunction with the Sunbelt Ag Expo and our winners are announced each year on the first day of the Expo.

The goal of the contest is to demonstrate the potential to produce high quality hay and baleage, showcase the management abilities of our southeastern growers, and highlight the technology and equipment that make it all possible! There are many economic reasons why southeastern growers have increased the quality of the forage they produce (e.g., unprecedented prices in the livestock sectors, great demand for their products, need for efficiency due to high input costs, etc.). But, the keys to success have been timely management, improved forage varieties, advanced harvest equipment, and related technologies that have come to the market over the last 10 years.  It is hard to recall a more exciting time in the hay and forage industry!

Building on the success of the first 10 years of this annual event, new sponsorships have really made participation even more attractive for hay and baleage producers!  Plus, perennial peanut and alfalfa now each have their own categories, so everyone will be competing with the same species.

SE Hay Contest Categories

Hay or baleage samples will be competing in one of the seven categories and ranked based on RFQ scores.

To qualify for entry to the SE Hay Contest, the producer and submitting Extension Agent must complete the Contest Entry Form. This form, along with a $ 17 check ($ 15 for the testing fee plus $ 2 for Hay Contest entry fee) made payable to UGA FEW Lab, MUST BE SUBMITTED SIMULTANEOUSLY to:

Southeastern Hay Contest
Feed and Environmental Water Lab (FEW)
2300 College Station Road Athens, Georgia 30602-4356

All Entries Must Be Received by the FEW Lab by:
5 p.m. on Monday, September 28, 2015

Download RULES and ENTRY FORM: 2015 SE HAY CONTEST

So, is your hay and baleage the class of the field? Think you can vie for a winning combination? If so, then check out the rules and entry forms and enter today! The deadline for entry into the SE Hay Contest is 5 p.m. on Monday, September 28, 2015.

While you’re at it, take time to advertise your high quality forage in the 2015 SE Hay Directory. The SE Hay Directory seeks to connect our high quality forage producers with buyers who value this product. Read more about the SE Hay Directory on page 4 of the SE Hay Contest and Hay Directory Rules and Entry Form.

The Southeast Hay Contest has a new website as well:  https://sehaycontest.wordpress.com/

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Jackson County Extension Director, Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/04/25/new-sponsorship-adds-major-boost-to-southeast-hay-contest/

2014 Southeast Hay Contest Results

2014 Southeast Hay Contest Results

NFREC Hay Bales in Field

There were 185 entries in the 2014 Southeastern Hay Contest. Not only were there more samples sent in this year, but thanks to more favorable weather, the quality of the samples was better as well.  Photo credit: Doug Mayo

Dennis Hancock, UGA Forage Extension Specialist and SE Hay Contest Coordinator

The Southeast Hay Contest celebrated its 10th year in 2014.  This contest is a cooperative extension effort of Auburn University, Clemson University, the University of Florida, and the University of Georgia, held in conjunction with the Sunbelt Agricultural Expo in Moultrie, GA.The number of entries in the Southeastern Hay Contest increased dramatically this year, as compared to previous years. In 2014, 185 entries were sent in to the contest, compared to only 109 entries in 2013.
Category winners for the 2014 Southeastern Hay Contest are listed in Table 1 below. The results are broken down into the six categories of the contest: warm season perennial grass hay (bermudagrass, bahiagrass), perennial peanut and alfalfa hay, perennial cool season grass (tall fescue, orchardgrass, etc.), mixed and annual grass hay,grass baleage, and legume baleage categories. Samples were ranked based on their Relative Forage Quality (RFQ) indexes.
Weather is always a major limiting factor when attempting to produce high quality forage. This year, dry conditions in the later half of the growing season caused drought to be a major limitation. Drought stress increased the incidence of high nitrate levels in the forage in 2014. Still, the forage quality was much higher than in 2013,when near daily rainfall greatly limited the SE hay producer’s ability to harvest good quality forage. The average relative forage quality (RFQ) was higher in each category in 2014, compared to last year’s results. Also, the winning entries from each category were much improved in 2014! Good management can make a remarkable improvement in forage quality in both favorable and unfavorable weather conditions.SE Hay Contest Results

What is Relative Forage Quality (RFQ)?

In the past, hay quality prediction equations were based on the fiber concentration of the hay crop. However, forage crops can have similar fiber content yet have very different digestibility. For instance, Tifton 85 bermudagrass often has a higher fiber concentration than other bermudagrass varieties, yet it is more digestible. This improved digestibility results in enhanced animal performance, but is not reflected using traditional forage testing methods. The Relative Forage Quality index was developed by the University of Florida and the University of Wisconsin to predict the fiber digestibility and animal intake of harvested crops. Since 2003, hundreds of warm season samples have been used to refine the RFQ equation for bermudagrass and other warm season forages. Currently, all forage sample results from the UGA Feed and Forage Testing Lab in Athens contain an estimate of Relative Forage Quality. This value is a single, easy to interpret number that improves producer understanding of a forage’s nutritive quality and helps in establishing a fair market value for the product.

How can Relative Forage Quality help me?

Relative Forage Quality allows hay producers to easily categorize and price hay lots based on relative quality.  Producers can purchase hay lots depending on its end use. For example there is little need to feed high-quality hay to livestock that could easily utilize poorer quality forage. Hay with a RFQ of 115-130 can be fed to maintain beef cow-calf pairs, hay with an RFQ of 125-150 is adequate for stocker cattle or young growing replacement heifers, and hay with an RFQ of 140-160 is suitable for dairy cattle in the first three months of lactation. It is also easy to see that Relative Forage Quality could provide the framework for a quality hay marketing system. For example, hay with a RFQ of 155 could conceptually be labeled “premium” hay, while hay with an RFQ of 105 could be labeled “fair”. This simple system could allow producers to price hay consistently and fairly across harvest maturity, fertilization regimes, or plant species (i.e. bermudagrass, bahiagrass, perennial peanut, or tall fescue).

PG

Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/10/25/2014-southeast-hay-contest-results/

USDA Planted Crop Acreage Report for the Southeast

Data provided by USDA National Agriculture Statistic Service.

Data provided by USDA National Agriculture Statistic Service.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) released the planted crop acreage report for the Southeast in June 2013.  The effects of a bumper crop of peanuts, and the resulting low peanut contracts have affected what was planted this year.  From this report, you can see that farmers in the Southeast have shifted some of the acreage the acreage that was used for peanuts last year to corn and soybeans.

Download the full report:  USDA SE Crop Acreage Report June 2013

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Jackson County Extension Director, & Livestock & Forages Agent

My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/08/23/usda-planted-crop-acreage-report-for-the-southeast/

Kudzu Bugs Invade Southeast

 

A new exotic pest, commonly called the Kudzu Bug, was found in Georgia during autumn 2009. The population has increased and spread since its discovery. As of July 2012, it has been confirmed in eight southeastern states, including Florida. The Kudzu Bug, Megacopta cribraria, is also identified as the bean plastid, lablab bug, or globular stink bug.

Kudzu bugs are a stink-bug type pest that feeds on legume plants such as kudzu, wisteria, soybeans, and with some limited reports on lima beans and peas. Kudzu is a key host where they overwinter and lay eggs.

It takes six to eight weeks for kudzu bugs to go from egg to adult. They migrate to soybean fields over several weeks in the summer months.

Typically they will be seen first on field edges near wooded areas. Infestations, when noticed, may cause a farmer great alarm, because of the large number of adult kudzu bugs flying around.

In June of 2010 and 2011 there were two generations which attacked soybean fields in Georgia. Studies in unprotected plots in Georgia and South Carolina had yield losses averaging 18 percent, with a range of 0-47 percent yield loss in the 19 locations studied.

Findings indicate Kudzu bugs feed on the sap of the stem and not the actual bean pods. So yield losses were similar to those seen from drought stress.

Although much is still not known about kudzu bug management, Dr. Phillip Roberts, University of Georgia Extension Entomologist, is currently recommending producers wait until immature or nymph kudzu bugs are present in the field prior to pesticide treatment to prevent the need for multiple applications on a single generation.

Several insecticides have provided effective control of kudzu bugs in trials conducted in Georgia and South Carolina. Thorough coverage of the plant canopy and penetration of the canopy are critical for effective control. To learn more about kudzu bugs, and their control, download: http://www.kudzubug.org/docs/GA_1-2012_SBGrow.pdf.

 

Adult kudzu bug infestation on the edge of a soybean field near Tifton, GA.

Insecticides labeled and tested for Kudzu Bug control in soybeans
Insecticide Number of trials % Control 2-5 days after treatment
Hero

1

96

Endigo

9

92

Brigadier

2

91

Discipline

3

90

Karate

8

89

Declare

3

85

2010 & 2011 trials conducted by   Dr. Jeremy Greene, Clemson University Entomologist

 

 

Adult kudzu bug on a human thumb.

Nymph kudzu bugs.

Kudzu bug eggs are grey to tan and always laid in twin rows.

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2012/07/28/kudzu-bugs-invade-southeast/

Panhandle Farmers Can Compete for the Title of Best Forage Producer at the Southeast Hay Contest

Photo Credit: Doug Mayo

Entries are currently being accepted for the 2012 Southeast Hay Contest which concludes in October at the Sunbelt Ag Expo in Moultrie, Georgia. Hay and baleage samples will be evaluated for quality and ranked based on the Relative Forage Quality (RFQ) score.

Contest entries require a $ 15 per sample fee and a completed entry form with the signature of County Agriculture Agent from the applicant’s county of residence. Forage samples must come from fields with a minimum of 25 days of regrowth and from the farm where the forage was grown. A hay probe should be used for taking the required core samples.

Contestants will receive a protein, energy, and fiber analysis for the $ 15 entry fee, very helpful for ration balancing or customer information. Contest rules and entry forms are available at: http://www.georgiaforages.com. All entries must be received by the University of Georgia Forage Lab by close of business on Monday, September 24, 2012.

 

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2012/05/11/panhandle-farmers-can-compete-for-the-title-of-best-forage-producer-at-the-southeast-hay-contest/