Tag Archive: Tomatoes

Let’s Talk Tomatoes

Tomatoes are abundant this time of year and you have many options to buy local and fresh. Tomatoes are one of the most popular home garden vegetable to grow and should now be providing the home gardener with fresh ripe bounty from now until summers end. Our local farmer’s markets are also selling tomatoes home grown and in many colors like deep red, bright yellow and green. Our climate is great for growing tomatoes. In fact, Florida is the nation’s largest producer of fresh tomatoes.

Nutritionally, tomatoes are packed with vitamin C and A. Low in calories and high in flavor, this succulent vegetable is a favorite all year long. Tomatoes are great served sliced and also in cooked dishes. Tomatoes should be stored at room temperature away from direct sunlight. Ripe tomatoes should be used within 3 to 4 days. For best flavor, do not refrigerate. Ripe tomatoes will give slightly to gentle pressure

If you want to preserve the summer’s tomato bounty, try your hand at canning. Remember to use USDA recommended practices for safety and long term quality. For a complete listing of how to safely can tomato products you will find the USDA guide here: http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/usda/GUIDE03_HomeCan_rev0715.pdf

 

Farm Fresh Salsa

Fresh salsa is a low-fat, low sodium, treat that is packed with flavor and essential nutrients. Adjust the salt and oil to your taste and diet.

Ingredients:

6 medium ripe tomatoes, chopped

4 garlic cloves, minced

1 ½ seeded and minced jalapenos

1 red bell pepper, finely dices

½ red onion, finely chopped

1 Tablespoon olive oil

1 lime, juiced

Chili Powder, salt and pepper, to taste

Fresh scallions, cilantro or parsley, to taste

Directions:

In a bowl, combine all ingredients. Place in refrigerator for up to 12 hours for flavor infusion. Serve with your own baked chips.

 

Baked Tortilla chips

1 package medium or large tortillas

Cooking Spray

Salt to taste

Directions

Preheat oven to 375˚ F

On a cutting board cut tortillas into 8 – 12 pieces using a pizza cutter.

Place aluminum foil on 2 or 3 baking sheets.

Place tortillas pieces in a single layer on a cookie sheet.

Lightly coat tortillas with cooking spray on both sides.

Sprinkle tortilla pieces with salt to taste – or with salt-free alternative for dietary needs.

Place in oven and cook 10-15 minutes until crisp.

PG

Author: Pam Allen – pha@ufl.edu

Pam Allen

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/05/lets-talk-tomatoes/

Keys to Growing Tomatoes in Florida

Keys to Growing Tomatoes in Florida

Florida farmers produce more fresh tomatoes than any other state. Yet Florida home gardeners find it difficult to grow tomatoes. By changing a few basic practices, home gardeners can increase their chances of success.

My philosophy of growing tomatoes in Florida (mixed with science) is outlined below.

First, I choose mostly determinate varieties that have resistance to key diseases.

Most gardeners are used to growing indeterminate varieties. Farmers mostly grow determinate types. Determinate varieties are more compact and produce most of their crop at one time. You can usually harvest all the fruit in two to five pickings and then pull up the plants. Indeterminate varieties, sometimes referred to as “everbearing” tomatoes, set fruit along a vine stem that continues to grow all season.

Correct variety selection is a must for success with tomatoes in Florida.

One reason home gardeners have a difficult time growing tomatoes in Florida is because of incorrect variety selection. Most popular (indeterminate) tomato varieties lack resistance to Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV) and bacterial wilt. These two diseases wreak havoc in home as well as commercial plantings. Amelia, a determinate variety that has TSWV resistance, has started showing up in some retail outlets. For a list of other varieties to look for, consult this publication, “Tomatoes in the Florida Garden”.

Secondly, I plant reasonably early – usually after April 1 (maybe earlier this year due to warm late winter). Tomato plants grow best when temperatures exceed a specific base temperature for a certain number of days (referred to as heat units or degree days). Tomatoes are heat-loving plants that need a long warm growing period to grow from seed to fruit. Optimum fruit set occurs within a narrow night temperature range. Tomatoes produce the largest yields of highest quality fruits when day temperatures are in the range of 80 to 85ºF and when night temperatures remain above 62 but below 72ºF.

Thirdly, I fertilize to produce a healthy, sturdy plant when the plant is young. With the first open flowers, I reduce fertilization (particularly the nitrogen) to about half the original rate. When the first fruits are about two inches in diameter, I reduce fertilization a little more. Once I harvest the first tomatoes, I further reduce the fertilizer to about ¼ the original rate or completely quit fertilizing. Many home growers fertilize tomatoes too much. This results in a big green plant with few tomatoes. This reduction in fertilization is mainly important with the amount of nitrogen being applied. The plant still benefits from adequate potassium.

There are two basic phases of growth in plants – vegetative and reproductive. When a tomato plant begins to produce flowers, it is becoming sexually mature (switching from a vegetative phase of growth to a reproductive phase of growth). Just remember that as plants mature and fruit, the demand for nitrogen decreases. Excessive nitrogen can reduce fruit set and development. Too much nitrogen keeps the plant in a vegetative phase of growth resulting in a big, overly vigorous, green plant with few to no fruit.

As heat, humidity, rains, diseases and insects increase during summer months, tomato production declines. Entire plants may begin to die. At this point, I’m thankful for any production I got. I do away with the plants and find something else to do other than grow tomatoes.

PG

Author: Larry Williams – llw5479@ufl.edu

Larry Williams is the County Extension Director and Residential Horticulture Agent for the UF/IFAS Extension Office in Okaloosa County.

Larry Williams

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/02/26/keys-to-growing-tomatoes-in-florida/

Leaf Mold Infecting High Tunnel Tomatoes

Leaf Mold Infecting High Tunnel Tomatoes

High tunnels have gained popularity in Florida over the past 10 years.  The USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service EQIP program and others like it have increased high tunnel acreage in Florida from none being reported in 2001, to 186 acres in 2013 according to a UF/IFAS statewide survey. Although the use of this version of low-tech protected agriculture is being more readily accessed across Florida, most of the current use is by small farms, with just one or a few 2,000 to 3,000 square foot structures. With new production systems, comes new pests and diseases not previously dealt with.

Velvety like tan appearance on the underside of the leaf is a characteristic symptom of leaf mold. Photo Credit: Mathews Paret

Velvety like tan appearance on the underside of the leaf is a characteristic symptom of leaf mold. Photo Credit: Mathews Paret

Leaf Mold of Tomato

It is no secret that tomatoes, and specifically heirloom tomatoes, are a favorite crop for small farmers selling to direct markets. They do very well in high tunnels.  This kind of production alleviates some of the disease and insect issues commonly dealt with in Florida. A new problem, however, has started to appear in high tunnels tomatoes called Leaf Mold. The fungus Fulvia fulva (also referred to as Passalora fulva) causes this disease and has a preferential growing environment of 85% or higher humidity, and temperatures ranging from 65 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. This disease is not typical in field production, but the high humidity environment of high tunnel production, especially during periods rainfall, has made it a concerning problem.

The symptoms of leaf mold include light green yellow spots on the top surface of the leaf. As the disease progresses, the underside of the leaf begins to show velvety tan areas corresponding to where the yellow spots are on the top side of the leaf. The disease can cause the leaves to prematurely drop.

Although this is a fairly new disease for growers in the Panhandle of Florida, growers in northern states who have been using this production system longer have had more experience with this disease. University of Minnesota Extension recommends using resistant varieties on a small scale.  Bear in mind, however, the resistant variety chosen may not have resistance to the race infecting the crop because of the many races of Fulvia fulva that could be attacking your plant. UM Extension also recommends the use of many cultural practices to increase air flow and reduce leaf wetness, such as using drip irrigation, pruning, and staking/trellising. They also have a short list of conventional fungicides to be used as a protectant during favorable conditions in the following publication: Leaf mold of tomato

Cornell University Cooperative Extension also has some information regarding leaf mold of tomato. Like Minnesota they recommend using resistant varieties, but warn that the disease has many races and that growers should grow several different resistant varieties to reduce risk. Here is a link to the Cornell University publication: Leaf Mold In High Tunnel Tomatoes 

Although the University of Florida has not completed any research related to leaf mold of tomatoes in high tunnels, there are some practices that can reduce growers risk and help manage the problem. Here are a few practices to consider that may reduce risk for area high tunnel tomato growers:

  • Crop Rotation – Tomatoes are a valuable crop and it is hard for a small grower who has only one high tunnel structure to rotate to other plant families, but it is an important management technique to help build the soil and prevent build up of diseases. A potential rotation could be as follwed:

high tunnel rotation

  • “Solarizing” the high tunnel In between crops, in the middle of the summer, is an ideal time to clean out the high tunnel of crop debris, close the side walls and doors, and let whatever pathogens are on surfaces to “cook” in the resulting heat.  A sheet of plastic can also be put over the soil to help solarize the soil. University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension provides information about solarizing in high tunnels in the following fact sheet: Horticulture Department Fact Sheet, Soil Solarization for High Tunnels

 

PG

Author: Blake Thaxton – bthaxton@ufl.edu

Santa Rosa County Extension Agent I, Commercial Horticulture

Blake Thaxton

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/04/09/leaf-mold-infecting-high-tunnel-tomatoes/

Conditions are Favorable for Bacterial Spot in Fall Tomatoes

Conditions are Favorable for Bacterial Spot in Fall Tomatoes

Typical bacterial spot symptoms on a tomato leaf.

Typical bacterial spot symptoms on a tomato leaf. Credit: University of Florida/IFAS

High temperatures and wet weather produce the perfect conditions for the onset of bacterial spot in tomato fields. The disease is caused by various species of Xanthomonas bacteria. Small spots (1/8 inch) form on leaves, stems, and fruit. The leaf spots are sometimes outlined in yellow. Fruit spots are raised and cause the tomato skin to rupture. Leaf drop may occur in extreme cases.

Bacterial spot on tomato fruit.

Bacterial spot on tomato fruit. Credit: University of Florida/IFAS

Bacterial spot is prevalent during warm, moist weather. It survives in volunteer plants (tomatoes and peppers) and plant debris. It is vectored by wind-driven rain or irrigation droplets. Contaminated seed can also serve as an inoculum source.

Disease Management:

  • Cultural Control – Crop rotation and off-site cull piles will reduce disease transfer from volunteers and crop residue.  Seed treatment and disease-free transplant production will reduce disease incidence.
  • Chemical Control – Bacterial spot can become resistant to copper, but a combination of mancozeb and copper bactericides is effective.  Sufficient control can be achieved by the plant inducer Actigard ®.
  • Resistant Varieties – There are no available bacterial spot resistant tomato cultivars. A number of resistant pepper cultivars are available and are listed in the  Pepper Production publication.

Good scouting and proactive cultural controls are the best methods for keeping vegetable diseases in check. For more information on bacterial spot and diagnosing other tomato diseases, please visit the following links:

 

PG

Author: Matt Lollar – mlollar@ufl.edu

Matt Lollar is the Jackson County Horticulture Agent. He has 5 years of experience with University of Florida/IFAS Extension and he began his career in Sanford, FL as the Seminole County Horticulture Agent. Matt is originally from Belle Fontaine, AL. He earned his MS and BS degrees in Horticulture Production from Auburn University.

Matt Lollar

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/10/03/conditions-are-favorable-for-bacterial-spot-in-fall-tomatoes/

Managing Bacterial Wilt in Tomatoes with Grafting and a Plant Defense Inducer

Fig. 1: A tomato field in Florida with severe incidence of bacterial wilt. Photo credit: Mathews Paret

Fig. 1: A tomato field in Florida with severe incidence of bacterial wilt. Photo credit: Mathews Paret

Sanju Kunwar, Mathews Paret, Jeff Jones, Laura Ritchie, Steve Olson, and Josh Freeman, UF/IFAS NFREC

Field tomato production in the southeastern United States is highly affected by bacterial wilt disease caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. In Florida, race 1 (biovar I, phylotype II) strains of Ralstonia solanacearum has been reported to cause more than 80% yield loss in field tomato production under disease favorable conditions (Fig. 1).

Although, use of resistant cultivars has been universally identified as the most effective method for managing the disease, the currently available commercial varieties in Florida do not have resistance to bacterial wilt. Recent studies by our group have demonstrated the effectiveness of grafting a bacterial wilt susceptible variety (BHN 602) to resistant hybrid rootstocks (BHN 998) to manage bacterial wilt disease in field tomato production with significant improvement in marketable yield (Fig. 2)

Fig. 2: Demonstration of the use of grafting as a successful tool for bacterial wilt management

Fig. 2: Demonstration of the use of grafting as a successful tool for bacterial wilt management

Also, in previous studies conducted at NFREC, Quincy in 2005, foliar applications of the plant defense inducer, Acibenzolar-S-Methyl (ASM; Syngenta Crop Protection), has been shown to provide effective bacterial wilt disease control in moderately resistant tomato genotypes with significant improvement in marketable yield compared to the susceptible control. Thus studies were conducted from 2013-2014 to evaluate the effect of ASM, applied as foliar or drip on grafted plants and impact on bacterial wilt incidence and total marketable yield.

Results

Studies conducted in 2013-14 validates the usefulness of grafting to effectively control bacterial wilt disease of tomato with significant improvement in total marketable yield compared to non-grafted control (Table 1). These studies also demonstrated that drip application of ASM on grafted plants maintained the yield similar to grafted plants. However, there was a negative impact of foliar applications of ASM on yield of grafted plants. There were no statistical differences in bacterial wilt incidence between grafted plants and grafted plants treated with foliar and drip application of ASM.Paret table 1

PG

Author: Mathews Paret – paret@ufl.edu


http://nfrec.ifas.ufl.edu

Mathews Paret

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/09/11/managing-bacterial-wilt-in-tomatoes-with-grafting-and-a-plant-defense-inducer/

Buckeye Rot in Tomatoes

Buckeye Rot in Tomatoes

Buckeye Rot on Tomato - Photo courtesy of Shep Eubanks

Buckeye Rot on Tomato – Photo courtesy of Shep Eubanks

With the recent frequent rains and hot temperatures, the incidence of buckeye rot on field tomatoes has increased in Holmes County, especially on tomatoes that were not planted on plastic mulch.

This disease in tomatoes is caused by Phytophthora parasitica, and typically shows up on fruit that are touching the soil or in the lower canopy of the plant.  This point of contact allows the fungus to enter, causing a slight brownish spot.  As the fungus develops and the spot enlarges, a series of irregular, brown-to-light colored concentric bands are produced, forming the buckeye effect as seen in the photo. The fruit decays very rapidly and breaks down in a soft rot.

All stages in the growth of the tomato fruit are attacked by the fungus.  In some cases, when the fruit remains damp and moist for a day or two, the concentric zone effect may be more indistinct, but invasion of the fruit by the fungus can be quite rapid.

The use of plastic mulch is a very important cultural practice to help control fruit rots in tomato fields. Soil rot (Rhizoctonia solani) and buckeye rot (Phytophthora parasitica) are two soil borne pathogens that caused great losses before plastic mulch was used to prevent contact between fruit and the soil. Good field drainage will also help reduce incidence of this disease.

Plastic mulch Photo credit:  Matt Orwat

Plastic mulch is a very important cultural practice to help control fruit rots in tomato fields. Photo credit: Matt Orwat

Fungicides are primarily preventative: They must be applied before the pathogen arrives on the foliage, to have effective disease control. Timing of the sprays is very important.

For more information, download:

Disease Control for Florida Tomatoes

Tomato Production Chapter Vegetable Handbook

 

PG

Author: Shep Eubanks – bigbuck@ufl.edu

Shep Eubanks is the County Extension Director and Agriculture Agent in Holmes County.

Shep Eubanks

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/06/05/buckeye-rot-in-tomatoes/

Why Are My Tomatoes Cracking?

Why Are My Tomatoes Cracking?

 

Imagine this scenario: After you have heavily invested in your tomatoes, cracks appear on your previously perfect fruit just as they are starting to ripen.

  

cracked Cherokee Purple tomato on the vine

Cracking in Cherokee Purple tomato
Credit: Mary Derrick, UF/IFAS

How frustrating!  Depending on the severity of the cracking the fruit will still ripen and be edible, although blemished. However, if cracking is severe, insect and disease pests may take advantage of the weakened skin and feast on the tomato.

Why does this happen?

When tomato plants have fluctuations in the amount of available water in the soil, the skin becomes susceptible to cracking. This occurs when tomatoes are allowed to dry out, then heavily watered. The excess in available moisture causes the inside of the fruit to grow more rapidly than the skin, thus cracking appears. As tomatoes grow toward maturity, they become more prone to cracking. Wide fluctuations in air temperature can also contribute to cracking.

Avoid cracking in your fruit by following these simple suggestions:

• Keep your plants evenly moist through regular irrigation and mulching

• Shade fruit with ample foliage cover

• Select varieties or hybrids that are known to resist cracking

• Harvest susceptible tomatoes at an earlier stage of development and ripen indoors.

 

 

Happy Gardening!

For additional information follow these links:

Tomatoes in the Florida Garden

Physiological, Nutritional, and Other Disorders of Tomato Fruit

 

PG

Author: Mary Derrick – mderrick@ufl.edu

Residential Horticulture Extension Agent for Santa Rosa County

Mary Derrick

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/07/07/why-are-my-tomatoes-cracking/

Totally Tasty Tomatoes

Tomatoes are the most popular vegetable in backyard gardens.  With each plant capable of producing 8-10 pounds of fruit or more, good gardeners may have more tomatoes than they can eat.  If you lack a green thumb, tomatoes are easy to find at farmers markets, roadside stands, and even grocery stores.

Botanically, the tomato is a fruit but in 1893 the U.S. Supreme Court declared the tomato a vegetable because of a tariff dispute.  Nutritionally, tomatoes are low in calories and fat and high in vitamin C and potassium.  They are good source of vitamin A in the form of beta carotene.  Tomatoes are also high in the antioxidant, lycopene.  Research has shown that lycopene may reduce the risk of heart disease and several types of cancer.  Lycopene is more easily absorbed from cooked tomato products. Eighty percent of the lycopene in the American diet comes from tomato products.

There is nothing tastier than a freshly picked tomato.  Choose tomatoes that are firm, fragrant, and brightly colored.  Avoid bruised tomatoes that are too soft or too hard.  Store tomatoes at room temperature, and only refrigerate tomatoes to keep them longer.  Fresh tomatoes are good in salads, on sandwiches, or tossed on scrambled eggs, nachos, or in other common dishes like macaroni and cheese.

Tomatoes are easy to preserve by freezing, drying, or canning.

FREEZING

Frozen tomatoes are mushy when thawed but can be used in soups and casseroles. Wash and dip tomatoes in boiling water for 30 seconds to loosen skins.  Core and peel.  Freeze whole or in pieces.  Pack in freezer containers, jars, or packaging, leaving 1- inch headspace.

Cooked Puree. Wash, peel, core, and cut tomatoes. Cook until soft. Press through food mill or sieve. Cool and pack into freezer jars or containers. Concentrate the puree by boiling until amount is reduced in half.

Juice. Wash, core, peel, and cut tomatoes. Simmer about 5 minutes; put through a sieve or food mill. Cool and pack as above.

DRYING

Small cherry tomatoes or tomatoes with a high solid content, such as Romas, work best for drying. Dried tomatoes are good in soups, stews, sauces, and salads. Tomato leather can be eaten as is, added to soups for flavor, or a little water can be added to the leather to make a savory tomato sauce.  Steam tomatoes for 3 minutes or dip tomatoes in boiling water for 1 minute to loosen skins. Chill in cold water; slip skins off. Cut into sections about 1/2 inch wide or slices; cut small tomatoes in half.  Dry tomatoes in a food dehydrator for approximately10-18 hours (length of time depends on initial moisture content).  Follow the manufacturer’s instructions.

CANNING

Tomatoes are a low-acid food and must be canned carefully to avoid the risk of botulism. To acidify tomatoes, add 1 tablespoon bottled lemon juice, 1/4 teaspoon citric acid, OR 2 tablespoons vinegar  per pint jar.  For quarts, add 2 tablespoons bottled lemon juice, 1/2 teaspoon citric acid, OR 4 tablespoons vinegar per jar.  The acid can be added directly to each jar before filling with the product.  Add a little sugar to offset any strong acid taste.  Tomatoes can be processed using a boiling water bath or a pressure canner.  Use only tested recipes and current canning recommendations from the National Center for Home Food Preservation (http://nchfp.uga.edu/).

Whole or halved raw tomatoes packed in water:

Add two tablespoons bottled lemon juice to each clean quart jar and fill with peeled, raw whole or halved tomatoes.  Cover tomatoes in jar with hot water leaving ½ inch headspace.  Wipe off jar rim.  Adjust pretreated lids and screw ring onto jar, finger tight.  Process quarts for 45 minutes in a boiling water bath.  If you use a dial-gauge pressure canner, process for 10 minutes at 11 pounds pressure   With a weighted gauge canner, process 10 minutes at 10 pounds pressure.

RECIPE:

Fresh Garden Salsa

The ingredients can be finely diced or use a medium chopped consistency for chunky salsa. Serve with tortilla chips or use as a side dish with grilled meat or anywhere you want a bright, tart, savory accompaniment.

2 large ripe, red slicing tomatoes, cored and chopped
1 small white onion, chopped
1 green onion, top included, chopped
1 to 3 jalapeno peppers, finely chopped
1/4 cup cilantro leaves, minced
Juice of lime
teaspoon salt

1. Using a serrated knife, chop tomatoes. If using plum tomatoes, add 2 tablespoons water.

2. In a medium bowl, toss together the tomatoes, onions, peppers, and cilantro. Squeeze lime juice over the mixture and sprinkle on the salt. Allow to rest 30 minutes before serving to allow salt to draw juice from the tomatoes. Stir again just before serving. Makes about 2 cups.

For more information about growing or preserving tomatoes or other produce, contact the UF/IFAS Leon County Extension office at 850-606-5200, or your local Extension office.

Author:  Kendra Zamojski, County Extension Director and Family and Consumer Sciences Agent, UF/IFAS Leon County Extension

Kendra Zamojski

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2012/07/27/totally-tasty-tomatoes/

Plant Bugs Terrorize Tomatoes

Plant bug nymphs are always ready to eat, especially vegetables.

Plant bug adult

Neither heat, nor drought, or seldom pesticides will keep the leaf footed plant bug off your tomatoes and other vegetables. This insect sucks juices from your fruit or vegetable leaving light colored marks on your fruit caused by cell distortion. Both nymphs and adults cause damage.

Most, if not all, have experienced the foul odor when squeezing or coming into contact with one of these pests, including its cousin the stink bug!

There are several control measures available to the farmer or gardener. Preventive measures include: weed management, planting trap crops, and introducing beneficial insects like parasitic wasps which attack eggs and tachinid flies that parasitizes nymphs and adults.

First, scouting your field or garden will determine damage potential. More than one bug per six plants warrants control. Spraying pesticides containing bifenthrin or applying insecticidal soaps can help. Always read the label before applying these, and all, products. Submitted by Mike Goodchild, Walton County Extension Director

Les Harrison

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2012/07/06/plant-bugs-terrorize-tomatoes-2/

Plant Bugs Terrorize Tomatoes

Plant bug nymphs are always ready to eat, especially vegetables.

Plant bug adult

Neither heat, nor drought, or seldom pesticides will keep the leaf footed plant bug off your tomatoes and other vegetables. This insect sucks juices from your fruit or vegetable leaving light colored marks on your fruit caused by cell distortion. Both nymphs and adults cause damage.

Most, if not all, have experienced the foul odor when squeezing or coming into contact with one of these pests, including its cousin the stink bug!

There are several control measures available to the farmer or gardener. Preventive measures include: weed management, planting trap crops, and introducing beneficial insects like parasitic wasps which attack eggs and tachinid flies that parasitizes nymphs and adults.

First, scouting your field or garden will determine damage potential. More than one bug per six plants warrants control. Spraying pesticides containing bifenthrin or applying insecticidal soaps can help. Always read the label before applying these, and all, products. Submitted by Mike Goodchild, Walton County Extension Director

Les Harrison

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2012/07/06/plant-bugs-terrorize-tomatoes/

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