Tag Archive: Exotic

Invasive Exotic Species and Control Workshop – September 28

Invasive Exotic Species and Control Workshop – September 28

The Six Rivers Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (CISMA) group and the Florida Forest Stewardship Program will offer an Invasive Exotic Species and Control Workshop on September 28, 2017; 9:00 am to 3:00 pm Central. This one day workshop will be held at the UF/IFAS Okaloosa County Extension Office, 3098 Airport Rd, Crestview, Florida 32539.  You are invited to learn about identifying and controlling some of the most troublesome invasive exotic plants like cogongrass, Japanese climbing fern, privet and others. We’ll also address exotic insects that are causing, or will cause big headaches for forestry and natural resource professionals. Earn pesticide applicator CEUs and forestry CFEs and connect with partnership and assistance opportunities!

Cost is $ 10 per person, lunch and materials included. You can register online through the Eventbrite Registration site. You can also reserve a space by contacting UF/IFAS Okaloosa County Extension at (850) 689-5850 and pay at the event with cash or check, made  payable to the University of Florida. Approved for 4.0 Category 1 SAF CFEs. FDACS pesticide CEUs are still pending approval.

Cogongrass will take over native or cultivated vegetation, as can bee seen in this hay field. Photo credit: Doug Mayo

 

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Author: Libbie Johnson – libbiej@ufl.edu

Agriculture agent at UF IFAS Escambia County Extension.
http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/

Libbie Johnson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/25/invasive-exotic-species-and-control-workshop-september-28/

Invasive Exotic Species and Control Workshop

Invasive Exotic Species and Control Workshop

Join us to learn about identifying and controlling some of the most troublesome invasive exotic plants like cogongrass, Japanese climbing fern, privet, and others.  We will also address exotic insects that are causing, or will cause, big headaches for forestry and natural resource professionals.  Earn pesticide applicator CEU’s, forestry CEU’s and connect with partnership and assistance opportunities.

 

Presented by the Six Rivers CISMA and the Florida Forest Stewardship

September 28, 2017

9:00 – 3:00 CDT

Okaloosa County Extension Office

3098 Airport Rd.

Crestview FL 32539-7124

invasive_species17_six_rivers_announcement

Registration:

Japanese Climbing Fern can quickly cover natural vegetation. Spores and small plants can be potentially transported in pine straw. Climbing ferns are a problem for managed timber and home landscapes. Photo by L. Scott Jackson

$ 10 per person; lunch and materials included

http://fsp-workshop092817.eventbrite.com/

Or, call Okaloosa County Extension at (850) 689-5850

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Author: Rick O’Connor – roc1@ufl.edu

Sea Grant Extension Agent in Escambia County

Rick O’Connor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/18/invasive-exotic-species-and-control-workshop/

Exotic Pet Amnesty Day set for Oct. 3 in Fort Walton Beach

Exotic Pet Amnesty Day set for Oct. 3 in Fort Walton Beach

Do you have any exotic pets you can no longer care for? Would you like the opportunity to surrender those pets without any penalties or fines? Then join the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) and Gulfarium Marine Adventure Park for an Exotic Pet Amnesty Day on Oct. 3 in Fort Walton Beach.

This free event is open to the public and will be held in front of Gulfarium Marine Adventure Park, 1010 Miracle Strip Parkway SE, Fort Walton Beach. Admission to the park is not included. Surrendered animals will be accepted between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. These animals will be checked by a veterinarian and made available for adoption by experienced individuals who are capable of caring for them.


Animals that will be accepted for surrender include reptiles, amphibians, mammals, birds, fish and invertebrates. Domestic animals, such as cats and dogs, will not be accepted. For each animal surrendered, individuals will receive two free admission passes to the Gulfarium.


Animals will be available for adoption after 2 p.m. Exotic pet adopters must be experienced and must have already applied and been approved by the FWC prior to the event. Potential adopters need to bring their acceptance letters with them. People can find
adopter applications at MyFWC.com/Nonnatives. Becoming an adopter is free, but people are required to register a minimum of five days prior to the event to adopt an animal.


Experts from the FWC, Gulfarium Marine Adventure Park and other local organizations will be on hand with information about caring for exotic pets, responsible pet ownership and potential ecological impacts of invasive species in Florida. Families can enjoy the opportunity to see several species of exotic animals and participate in crafts and games.


For additional information about this event, call the FWC’s Exotic Species Hotline at 888-Ive-Got1 (888-483-4681). Exotic pet owners who cannot attend this event may call this number for assistance in finding a new home for their animal.


For more information about Gulfarium Marine Adventure Park, call 850-243-9046 or visit
http://www.gulfarium.com/.

 

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Author: Rick O’Connor – roc1@ufl.edu

Sea Grant Extension Agent in Escambia County

Rick O’Connor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/10/02/exotic-pet-amnesty-day-set-for-oct-3-in-fort-walton-beach/

Six Simple Ideas for Dealing with Your Unwanted Exotic Pet

Six Simple Ideas for Dealing with Your Unwanted Exotic Pet

 This python was caught in a garage on Bayou Chico (Pensacola) - it did not belong to the homeowner. Photo: Escambia County Animal Control

This exotic snake was caught in a garage on Bayou Chico (Pensacola) – it did not belong to the homeowner. Photo courtesy of: Escambia County Animal Control

Now that we have completed National Invasive Species Week many readers have learned what NOT to do with their unwanted exotic pets… but what DO you do with them? Here are six simple suggestions for you to consider.  Many professional herpetologists suggest similar options.

 

  • Keep it    This may sound a bit strange but it is actually an option. Many who purchase an exotic pet do so without the understanding of how large they may get, or expensive they are to maintain. However if the owner does a little homework you may be able to design, or purchase, a enclosure for your pet that will make them more comfortable, easier for you to handle, and less expensive to maintain.
  • Find a new home This is the most popular option. Listing the animal on the internet or in the local paper may yield a person very interested in having and properly maintaining it… a win-win for all. Other options can include nature centers and schools where education on invasive species may find a place that needs and wants the animal.  There are rescue groups for specific species which can be found on the internet.
  • Return to the pet store Many pet stores will take pets they have sold back for resale. This is certainly a better option than releasing it but pet owners should understand that they will probably will not get their money back.
  • Contact your local animal control office Our local animal control will not take exotic pets but some may, and most can, provide good advice as to local locations that may be interested in it.
  • Contact your local state wildlife agency Most state wildlife agencies are very familiar with non-profits, nature centers, and other locations that will accept exotic animals. In Florida the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission offer Amnesty Days where residents can bring their unwanted exotic pets to a central locations; FWC will then try to find them a new home. To find the nearest Amnesty Day to your home visit the FWC website at MyFWC.com.
  • Euthanize   Though for most pet homeowners this is not an option, for some it may be their only option. If you do plan to euthanize your pet you should do so only with a certified veterinarian.

Whichever option the pet owner chooses, releasing them into the wild is NOT a good option. In addition to being against the law it could be lethal for your pet or, if they do survive, economically or environmentally catastrophic for your community.

These ideas and suggestions were provided by Dr. Steve Johnson, University of Florida Department of Wildlife Ecology, and the Southeast Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation.  For more information on what to do with unwanted exotic pets please visit their websites.

An unwanted green iguana now resides at the Roy Hyatt Environmental Center where others can learn about the issues of exotic pets.  Photo: Molly O'Connor

An unwanted green iguana now resides at the Roy Hyatt Environmental Center where others can learn about the issues of exotic pets. Photo: Molly O’Connor

 

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Author: Rick O’Connor – roc1@ufl.edu

Sea Grant Extension Agent in Escambia County

Rick O’Connor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/03/06/six-simple-ideas-for-dealing-with-your-unwanted-exotic-pet/

Exotic Invaders of the Florida Panhandle

Tarzan used them as a superhighway through the trees in every adventure created by Edgar Rice Burroughs.  Villains and scoundrels alike fell prey to the ape-man and his horde of avenging simians descending on vines from the trees.

Great fiction, but removed from the reality of present day panhandle Florida.  This is especially true about the vines which are impossible to use as a propulsion system and in many cases are exotic invaders.

Kudzu Vines Covering native vegetation - Image Credit Les Harrison UF IFAS

Kudzu Vines Covering native vegetation – Image Credit Les Harrison UF IFAS

The most infamous is Kudzu (Pueraria montana), sometimes known as the weed that ate the south.  It was introduced into the United States at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876.

By 1900 kudzu was available by mail order as inexpensive livestock forage, and later sold by the USDA as an erosion control.  The vigorous nature of the plant allowed it easily to escape into the wild.

It now exists in impenetrable tangles as large as 100 acres killing trees, covering structures, and smothering native plants. Kudzu is an aggressive leguminous vine capable of growing one foot per day. It can easily grow 60 feet in a single growing season.

It establishes roots sporadically as it covers an area, layering vines and foliage on top of each other. One key to this plant’s efficiency is its ability to orient each leaf so that the maximum amount of sunlight possible is absorbed. This multi-directional orientation of leaves also poses special problems with sufficiently wetting the top sides of foliage with herbicide.

Special effort is necessary to control kudzu. Older, well established plants are harder to control and completely eradicate. Follow-up spot treatments can require five to ten years in extreme cases. For easiest access, it is best to evaluate kudzu problems in winter when vines and foliage are withered.

Japanese Climbing Fern - Image Credit Les Harrison UF IFAS

Japanese Climbing Fern – Image Credit Les Harrison UF IFAS

Japanese Climbing Fern (Lygodium japonicum) is another aggressive exotic invasive, but not as commonly recognized as Kudzu.  It is presently the only non-native invasive fern in the Florida.

Japanese climbing fern is a delicate looking perennial climbing vine.  It is capable of forming a dense mat-like thatch capable of covering trees and shrubs. Initially, it was introduced from Japan as an ornamental.

This fern reproduces and spreads readily by wind-blown spores. Animals, equipment, and even people who move through an area with climbing ferns are very likely to pick up spores and move them to other locations.

It is scattered throughout the lower portions of Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, South Carolina, and much of Florida, including panhandle. Planting or cultivation of this vine for ornamental purposes is prohibited by statute.

Both vines have many negative attributes. Among these are crowding out native vegetation, harboring destructive insects and diseases, and providing a fire bridge to the crown of unlucky trees.

Adequate control of both exotic vines has been achieved with multiple applications of herbicides.  As with most invasive plants, repeated and correctly timed treatments are likely to be necessary.

 

Contact your local UF IFAS  Extension office for more information

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Author: Les Harrison – harrisog@ufl.edu

Les Harrison is the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Director. He began his work in the Northwest Extension District as the Sustainable Agriculture and Extension Technology Agent in Leon County on August 25, 2006. His career in agriculture extends back over thirty five years and includes work in business, government and academic positions. Prior to working with the Extension Service, he spent 16 years with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services in the Division of Marketing and Development. He worked in four of the division’s six bureaus. He has also managed farm supply cooperatives in Alabama and Virginia with annual sales over four million dollars, worked for an international grain company, and was a research associate for Auburn University’s Agricultural Economics Department. He has a Master’s of Science Degree in Agricultural Economics from Auburn University and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Journalism from the University of Florida. He is the author of over 500 publications and has written professionally for print, electronic and broadcast media.

Les Harrison

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/12/02/exotic-invaders-of-the-florida-panhandle/

Invasive Exotic Species ID and Control Workshop September 19

Invasive Exotic Species ID and Control Workshop September 19

Invasive Seminar Graphic

September 19, 2013; 9:00 am – 3:00 pm CT
UF/IFAS Jackson County Extension Office

Florida’s Forest Stewardship Program and the Apalachicola Regional Stewardship Alliance CISMA will be offering an Invasive Exotic Species Identification and Control Workshop on September 19th at the Jackson County Agriculture Conference Center, 2741 Pennsylvania Avenue, Marianna, FL from 9:00 to 3:00 PM.

Many exotic plants are invasive weeds that form expanding populations on our landscape, making land management a challenge. Some exotic animals have also become a problem for land managers. The rapid and effective dispersal characteristics of these invaders make them extremely difficult to eliminate. This program will describe some of the more common and troublesome invasive exotic plants and animals in this region and current strategies to control them.

Tentative Agenda:
9:00 am Sign-in, meet & greet

9:15 Welcome & introduction, Brian Pelc, Apalachicola Regional Stewardship Alliance (ARSA) CISMA Chair, The Nature Conservancy; and Chris Demers, Forest Stewardship Coordinator, UF-IFAS School of Forest Resources & Conservation (SFRC)

9:30 Herbicide safety and application techniques, Pat Minogue, Associate Professor, SFRC

10:30 Break

10:45 Invasive exotic species ID and control techniques, Judith Ludlow, Extension Agent, UF-IFAS Calhoun County Extension Service; and Pat Minogue

12:00 pm Lunch

1:00 Available assistance, field demo, Rose Godfrey, Extension Associate, SFRC; Brian Pelc

3:00 Evaluation, CEUs, CFEs, adjourn

Register: A $ 10 fee covers lunch and materials. Please register on-line at http://fsp-workshop091913.eventbrite.com/. You can also reserve a space by contacting Jackson County Extension at (850) 482-9620. Pesticide Applicator Continuing Education Units approved: 2 Core, 1 Nat. Area WM; SAF Continuing Education hours approved: 3.0 hours Cat 1 and 1.0 hour Category 2. Filling fast – Register now. Directions to the facility are on the back. Please share this announcement with others who may be interested.

Download the printer friendly flyer:  Invasive Species Workshop

Apalachicola CISMA

 

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Author: Judy Ludlow – judy.ludlow@ufl.edu

Judy Ludlow is the Agriculture and Natural Resource Agent in Calhoun County, Florida

Judy Ludlow

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/08/02/invasive-exotic-species-id-and-control-workshop-september-19/

Revised UF Publication on Controlling Invasive Exotic Plants in North Florida Forests

Photo Credit: UGA Bugwood

Controlling Invasive Exotic Plants in North Florida Forests (SSFOR19/FR133)

Invasive non-native organisms are one of the greatest threats to the natural ecosystems of the United States. Invasive plants reduce biodiversity, encroach on endangered and threatened species, and rob native species of habitat. This 8-page fact sheet describes many of the current methods used to manage some of the more common and troublesome invasive exotic plants in north Florida forests, such as tallow trees, privet, climbing fern, kudzu and cogongrass. Written by Chris Demers, Alan Long and Rick Williams, and published by the UF Department of School of Forest Resources and Conservation, and revised January 2012.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/FR/FR13300.pdf

 

Kudzu photo credit: UGA Bugwood

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2012/05/01/revised-uf-publication-on-controlling-invasive-exotic-plants-in-north-florida-forests/