Tag Archive: Feeding

Breaking Bread: Feeding Family and Friends

“Breaking bread”, or eating a meal with others, is a deeply personal way to foster a sense of belonging. Food is a social glue; it brings us together for conversation, a time to catch up, a chance to connect with loved ones, and it fills our bellies as well.

If you wish to “break bread” (with actual bread), here are some nice, tasty bites of information.bread 2

  • The hypnotic, heavenly, warm, welcoming aroma of freshly baked bread makes many of us feel that all is right with the world and provides a sense of comfort.
  • Researchers have found that the smell of baking bread triggers a positive mood that leads to a higher degree of benevolence, kindness, and concern for the welfare of others.

“Bread – like real love – took time, cultivation, strong loving hands, and patience. It lived, rising and growing to fruition only under the most perfect circumstances”. – Melissa Hill, Something from Tiffany’s

  • A fascinating thing about bread is that though it is often viewed as a “poverty fuel”, it can feel like a luxury to even the most monetarily wealthy of individuals.

“”There are people in the world so hungry, that God cannot appear to them except in the form of bread”. – Mahatma Gandhi

  • If you’re going to break bread with bread, go for healthy whole grain varieties for plenty of good-for-you minerals, vitamins, and fiber.

Break bread for a healthy life.

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Author: Angela Hinkle – ahinkle@ufl.edu

Angela Hinkle is the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) Agent in Escambia County.

Angela Hinkle

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/04/01/breaking-bread-feeding-family-and-friends/

Stockpiled Grazing Can Reduce Winter Feeding Costs

Stockpiled Grazing Can Reduce Winter Feeding Costs

Researchers at Auburn Univerity have conducted research trials feeding cow-calf pairs and stocker calves on stockpiled Tifton 85 bermudagrass at the Wiregrass Research and Education Center in Headland, Alabama.

Researchers at Auburn University have conducted research trials feeding cow-calf pairs and stocker calves on stockpiled Tifton 85 Bermudagrass at the Wiregrass Research and Education Center in Headland, Alabama.  This photo was taken on December 9, 2015 before the temporary electric fenced was moved over to allow access to fresh grazing.  Notice that the heifers are mainly grazing on the tender, high quality leaves and leaving the course stems that are much higher in fiber.  Photo credit:  Doug Mayo

Winter feeding is one of the largest expenses for ranchers, and hay production and feeding is one of the major labor requirements in the annual management of a cattle operation. Researchers across the country have long searched for ways to extend the grazing season to reduce the “forage gap,” so that less hay is required each winter.  Gary Lacefield, Emeritus Kentucky Forage Extension Specialist, has a great tag line when he talks to ranchers, “Every day grazed is money saved!”  Much of the research focus in the Southeast has been on identifying cool season forage varieties that can fill the gap over the winter before warm-season permanent pastures emerge again in the spring.  A relatively new idea, that researchers at several universities in the southeast have been evaluating, is stockpiling Bermudagrass for late-fall grazing to reduce the forage gap before winter grazing is available.

The basic concept of stockpiled forages is to utilize forage varieties with high digestibility such as Tifton 85 Bermudagrass or limpograss, that maintain their quality even when mature.  A hay-field can be managed so that 2-3 cuttings of hay are produced through the growing season, and then fertilized after cutting in August.  Instead of making a fall cutting of hay, the grass is harvested utilizing “frontal grazing,” which is relatively easy to manage with temporary electric fences that are moved every 3-4 days, until all of the grass has been utilized.

Auburn Stockpiled Grazing Trials

Researchers at the Wiregrass Research and Education Center, near Headland, Alabama recently conducted a two-year trial to evaluate the effectiveness of this practice as compared to the standard of feeding hay and a supplement for fall calving cows (2013-13), and are currently evaluating this management technique with weaned heifers (2014-15), as seen in the photo above.  Notice the Bermudagrass that had already been grazed on the right side of the photo.  You can see one of the real advantages of this system is that the cattle primarily graze the high quality leaves and left the course stems behind.  When we make hay, all of the plant is harvested, which lowers the overall nutrient value of the forage.  As you can see in the photo below, because 2015 was so mild, with minimal frost in November and December, the grass stayed green and continued to grow late into the year.

Tifton 85 Bermudagrass can be stockpiled from August through October and then grazed prior to the hard freezes that generally come in mid-January. Temporary electric fences are gradually moved across the field to limit graze the stockpiled grass. Photo taken December 9, 2015 by Doug Mayo.

Tifton 85 Bermudagrass can be stockpiled from August through October and then grazed prior to the hard freezes that generally come in mid-January. Temporary electric fences are gradually moved across the field to limit graze the stockpiled grass. Photo taken December 9, 2015 by Doug Mayo.

One of the challenges for using this management technique is determining the stocking rate for the system and how far to move the fences for each grazing period.  For the trial conducted with cow-calf pairs, the stocking rate was set at one cow per acre.  The following formula was used to calculate the stocking rate:Stockpiled grazing formulaThe performance cows grazing the stockpiled Bermudagrass was compared to cows fed free-choice August cut hay that was 10% crude protein (CP) and 51% total digestible nutrients (TDN) plus 6 lbs./head/day of whole cottonseed. Over the two-year study, forage samples were collected at five points throughout the grazing period.  From the chart below you can see that the stockpiled grass was higher in nutrient quality than the hay, even in January, with an average nutrient content of 12% CP and 60% TDN.

Stockpiled Bermudagrass forage quality chartResults of the Auburn Cow-calf Stockpiled Grazing Trial

Over the two years of this study, researchers at Auburn were able to provide around 100 days of grazing, with the 1 cow/acre stocking rate.  They were able to reduce the costs for feeding these animals $ 332 per head during this period.  While the cows did lose some weight, which is expected for fall calving cows, they were able to maintain the cows in an acceptable Body Condition Score (BCS) of 5 to 6 throughout the study.The reproductive performance (88% pregnancy rate) and the weaning weights of the calves (550-620 lbs.) was similar to cows that had been fed the traditional hay and supplement.

AU Stockpiled Grazing Summary ChartThe Bottom Line

  1. Growing, fertilizing, harvesting, storing, and feeding hay is expensive.  Finding ways to extend the grazing season to allow precision, automated, 4-wheel drive forage combines (cows) to harvest (graze) their own food is certainly more efficient than hay or baleage production and feeding.  Like Dr. Lacefield says, “Every day grazed is money saved.” In the recent Auburn study they were able to cut their feeding expenses by 66%.
  2. Like all grazing operations, there are weather and pest risks to this system.  Armyworms, early freezes, flooded fields, and fall drought can reduce how effective this system will be each year.  But these same factors affect hay and baleage production as well.
  3. Stockpiling a hay field from August to October does prevent harvesting of hay in October when we generally have more predictable weather.  This system does require adequate and quality hay production from spring and summer cuttings.  If for some reason more hay is still needed from fall production, ranchers could always cut the grass for hay instead of stockpiling, and simply purchase more supplements for a traditional feeding system that year.
  4. While this system won’t completely eliminate the need for hay production and feeding, it can reduce the feeding period by as much as 90-100 days and reduce the forage gap.  Forage quality declined significantly in January, so this system would not be suitable for the entire winter.  But, if winter annual pastures are also utilized, the amount of hay needed to carry a herd through winter could be significantly reduced.  In the Auburn study, cows grazed the stockpiled Bermudagrass from late October through early February with a stocking rate of a cow/acre.  Many operations don’t have access to an acre of Bermudagrass for every cow, so the total grazing period would be shorter.  Even with higher stocking rates, hay and supplements would only be needed to carry the herd until cool-season annual pastures are ready, and then between grazing periods.
  5. This system would not be near as effective on lower quality forages.  Bahiagrass would not work as well, since it is much less digestible with lower protein levels in the late fall.  Fertilization is also a key element of this system.  Just pulling cows off a pasture and letting unfertilized bahiagrass mature would not provide the same results.

Source:  Stockpiled Tifton 85 Bermudagrass as an Alternative to Feeding Hay for Lactating Cows

Kim Mullenix, Extension Beef Cattle Systems Specialist, Courteney Holland, Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Animal Sciences, and Walt Prevatt, Extension Livestock Economist, Auburn University, Auburn, AL.

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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/01/08/stockpiled-grazing-can-reduce-winter-feeding-costs/

Beef Cattle Winter Feeding Considerations – Seminar December 3

Beef Cattle Winter Feeding Considerations will address how to make the most of many winter feeding systems, including cool season forages like the cows above are enjoying. Photo Credit: Mark Mauldin

Beef Cattle Winter Feeding Considerations will address how to make the most of many winter feeding systems, including cool season forages like the cows above are enjoying.
Photo Credit: Mark Mauldin

The winter feeding season for the beef cow herd is all but here. Hopefully well before now you developed and implemented a plan for meeting your herd’s nutritional needs through the winter. At this point your options are fairly set. Hay should already be in the barn, either bought or baled on the farm. Winter grazing should already be planted and hopefully up and growing. Arrangements should be made for commodity feeds. Regardless of what plan you have in place, and especially if you have no plan in place there are some inevitable questions that begin to arise, once those limited feed resources begin to dwindle. Do I really have enough hay? Is the hay I bought really any good? Did I plant enough grazing? Do I need to supplement my hay? What’s my best option for supplementation? Will my cows stay in good enough shape to breed back?

For help answering these and other similar questions that face cattlemen this time of year, attend Beef Cattle Winter Feeding Considerations. This seminar will be held in Chipley the evening of Thursday, December 3rd. Space is limited, preregistration is required. Call Mark Mauldin (850-638-6180) at the UF/IFAS Washington County Extension Office to register. There is a $ 5 registration fee, payable at the door. Dinner will be served at the event. See the flyer below for more details.

Winter Feed Program Flyer

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Author: Mark Mauldin – mdm83@ufl.edu

I am the Agriculture and Natural Resources agent in Washington County. My program areas include livestock and forage, row crops, and pond management.
http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu

Mark Mauldin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/11/21/beef-cattle-winter-feeding-considerations-seminar-december-3/

Have a Plan for Efficient Winter Feeding

Washington County cattle in a controlled grazing system utilizing cool season forages this past spring. Photo Credit: Mark Mauldin

Washington County cattle in a controlled grazing system utilizing cool season forages this past spring.
Photo Credit: Mark Mauldin

While these recent “cool” snaps have provided a welcome break from the summer heat, they bring with them a reminder that production from perennial pasture grasses are slowing down and will soon be dormant for the winter. Deciding how to meet the nutritional needs of your cattle through the winter is one of the most important management decisions a cow-calf producer will make. There are many options for wintering cows. There is no one option that is the best for all operations. Below are some considerations to help you formulate your plan for this winter. All feeding programs should be based on efficiently meeting nutritional requirements.

Manage cows according to their nutritional requirements; they are not all the same. Larger heavier milking cows have higher nutritional requirements than do small lighter milking cows. Additionally, lactating cows have considerably higher nutrient requirements than dry cows. Young cows/heifers that are still growing while lactating have even higher nutritional demands. Feeding a dry cow to meet the demands of a lactating cow is a waste of money. Feeding a lactating cow to meet the demands of a dry cow will result in loss of body condition score and most likely reduced reproductive performance. In many cases addressing the varying nutritional demands relates more related to feed quality than quantity. If supply is limited, higher quality feedstuffs should be reserved for lactating cows. This scenario is particularly evident with hay and cool season forages. Hay quality varies tremendously.  Feed the highest quality hay to the cows with the highest demands, this helps minimize the need for additional supplementation. When cool season forages are in short supply reserve them for the cows that need them most and will utilize their high quality the most effectively.

Understand the nutritional value of what you are feeding. Simply having hay or some other feed available for your cows will not ensure their nutritional requirements are being met. There are scenarios where the nutrient density of a feedstuff is so low that cows cannot physically consume enough feed to meet their needs. This scenario is most often associated with low quality hay or ensiled forages containing excessive amounts of water. Forage based feedstuffs (hay, baleage, grazed forages, etc.) can be sampled and analyzed to determine nutrient content. Processed or bagged feeds should come with a guaranteed analysis showing the nutritional makeup of the feed. Standard nutritional information for bulk commodity feeds is readily available.  Sampling and lab analysis can be used to obtain information on specific loads of feed. If you know the nutrient requirements of your cows and the nutrient content of your feedstuffs, you can determine how much they need to consume to meet their requirements. Knowing how much of a particular feedstuff your cattle will require allows you to do economic comparisons of the different feeding options.

Always keep in mind a cow can only eat about 2% of her body weight in dry matter each day. Example: 2% of 1200lbs. is 24 lbs., so a 1200lb cow can eat about 24lbs of dry matter or about 27lbs of 12% moisture hay. No matter how cheap a feed is, if a cow can’t consume enough of it to meet her requirements it’s not going to be a good option.

Collecting samples and having an analysis performed on your hay will let you know the nutrient content. Knowing the nutrient content allows you to calculate what f any additional supplementation is required. Photo Credit: James Strickland

Collecting samples and having an analysis performed on your hay will let you know the nutrient content. Knowing the nutrient content allows you to calculate what, if any, additional supplementation is required.  Photo Credit: James Strickland

Use proper feeding/grazing techniques to help reduce feeding waste. Winter feeding is expensive. It incorporates seed and fertilizer costs associated with forage production, hay production and storage costs, purchased feed expenses, etc.  It really does not matter the source of the cost, no winter feed is free, so don’t waste it.

  • Be sure to use some type of hay feeding device; ring, rack, trailer, manger, something to prevent cows from standing on the hay while they eat it. Also try to avoid feeding more hay than the herd will consume in a few days. Feeding hay is an inherently wasteful process, do what you can to limit the waste.
  • When grazing cool season forages utilize some form of rotational or controlled grazing. Cows don’t need access to these high quality forages 24-7. Providing cows with too much access to these forages allows them to selectively graze and trample more forage, which reduces the efficiency of forage utilization. It also does not allow the forage plants adequate opportunity for regrowth, and in turn greatly reduces total forage production. There are many grazing systems that can help maximize the productivity of cool season forages; consult your county agriculture agent for help determining which one would best suit your operation.
  • When feeding a bagged or commodity feed, adequate bunk space is a primary concern. Space must be sufficient to feed the total amount of feed needed for the group of cows and to allow each animal sufficient access to the feed. Never bunk feed more than one day’s ration/supplement at one time; this will greatly increase the likelihood of waste, over-consumption, and possibly even cause digestive issues.

Grouping and feeding cows according to what they need, determining the most cost effective means by which to meet those needs, and minimizing waste will go a long way toward effectively and efficiently wintering cows. For more information on anything in this article or help addressing the many other factors associated with wintering cows, contact your county’s UF/IFAS Agriculture Agent.

 

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Author: Mark Mauldin – mdm83@ufl.edu

I am the Agriculture and Natural Resources agent in Washington County. My program areas include livestock and forage, row crops, and pond management.
http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu

Mark Mauldin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/10/10/have-a-plan-for-efficient-winter-feeding/

Autumn and Winter Feeding of Honey Bees

Autumn and Winter Feeding of Honey Bees

Gulf County Beekeeper, Eddie Causey feeding honeybees corn syrup.  Photo credit:  Roy Carter

Gulf County Beekeeper, Eddie Causey feeding honeybees corn syrup. Photo credit: Roy Carter

Normally a well-managed colony will require little supplemental feeding, but such feeding, when it is necessary, may determine the ultimate survival of the colony.  Ensuring that bees always have an adequate food supply is a form of insurance, and it is generally a profitable investment.  A colony which has a surplus of food from foraging on natural sources will not eat supplemental feed just because it is available. However, the colony that is short of necessary food stores can starve to death during the winter without it.

Feeding bees can be done in several different ways and there is a small variety of foodstuffs that can be fed to bees.  Bees may be fed stored honey, isomerized corn syrup (high fructose corn syrup), and of course, sucrose or table sugar.

Honey is the simplest product to feed the bees when their food stores are in short supply.  Some beekeepers will save frames filled with honey so that they will be able to feed their bees when necessary.  The feeding of honey already in frames requires very little preparation and the frames can be placed in the hive near the bee cluster.

Extracted honey may also be fed to bees, but it requires more work than using honey already in combs.  If extracted honey is used, then the beekeeper should be certain that it came from a disease-free source.

Sucrose or table sugar is still the most commonly used bee feed.  The sucrose may be fed in solid (dry), liquid, or in candy type forms.  The form chosen is influenced by the condition of the colony, the weather, or time of year.  One word of caution, bees can completely digest sucrose, but sugar products that have other components such as starches and sugars other that sucrose, may present problems to the bees.

Isomerized corn syrup, commonly call high fructose corn syrup, is also a substance that can be fed to bees.  It is made by converting starch to glucose and then some of the glucose to fructose.  The fact that the product contains both fructose and glucose makes its composition similar to that found in real honey.

Sugar syrup is probably the most popular way to feed bees that are low in food stores, though the use of high fructose corn syrup is becoming more common among commercial beekeepers.   Sugar syrup is basically a mixture of sucrose in water.  The mixtures are generally one part sugar to one part water (by volume) for a thin mixture or two parts sugar to one part water (by volume) for heavy mixtures.

What not to feed:

●Never feed bees honey that comes from an unknown source.  Honey can contain spores of diseases such as American Foul Brood.

●Never feed bees sugar with additives.  Brown sugar contains molasses.  Powdered sugar often contain cornstarch.  Commercial fondant may contain flavoring and/or colorings.  Any of these “extras” could cause honey bee dysentery.

●Although many commercial beekeepers use high-fructose corn syrup, be aware that it may contain Hydromethyifarfural (HMF) especially if it is cold or has gotten too warm.  HMF is poisonous to bees.

How to feed:

●If temperatures are warm (above 50°F) you can use liquid feed in one of the available internal feeders so your bees don’t have to go outside to eat.

●If temperatures are going to be cold, you can use a candy board, or an empty shallow super placed under the hive lid but over the upper-most box containing bees.  The super can be filled with sugar cakes, or even liquid feed in one of the various feeder types.

●In colder months, it is always best to put feed over the cluster so the bees can have direct access to it.  If you elect to feed liquid food over the cluster, you must make sure your feeder does not leak.  Leaking feeders in the winter can be a major stressor to clustering bees.

●Nectar availability is typically low in fall and winter. As such, colonies are more prone to rob one another this time of year.  Make sure that your feeders are “clean,” especially after being filled with sugar water as it can attract robbing bees.

When to feed:

●Colonies need about 75, or  more, pounds of honey to survive winter.

●If a hive feels light in the fall; you should start feeding liquid sugar syrup (2 parts sugar to one part water by volume) as soon as possible.  When the temperature starts dipping below 50°F, switch to one of the cold-weather methods.

●In any case, check the hives on the occasional dry and sunny days.  Move frames of honey closer to the cluster, if possible, or add feed if necessary.  Do not be lulled into thinking that they have “made it through winter” just because the temperatures are warming in the spring.

Sources of Information:

“The Hive and the Honey Bee” by Roy A Grout, 1992 Edition

Winter Feeding of Honey Bees – Honey Bee Suite

 

Hive feeding.  Photo credit:  Doug Mayo

A colony which has a surplus of food from foraging on natural sources will not eat the supplemental feed just because it is available. However, the colony that is short of necessary food stores can starve to death during the winter. Photo Credit: Doug Mayo.

 

 

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Author: Roy Carter – rlcarter@ufl.edu

Roy Carter

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/11/02/autumn-and-winter-feeding-of-honey-bees/

Winter Feeding the Annual Dilemma

Winter grazing trial at the UF/IFAS NFREC February 2013 show lush winter pasture for cattle.

Winter grazing trial at the UF/IFAS NFREC February 2013 show lush winter pasture for cattle.

Nicolas DiLorenzo, UF/IFAS NFREC Beef Nutrition Specialist

The days are getting shorter and the nights cooler.  It won’t be long until summer bahiagrass and bermudagrass pastures will go dormant after the first killing frost.  Ranchers have some tough decisions to make on the most practical, and economical options to feed their cattle herds this winter.  Winter forage are not inexpensive.  The typical cost of annual forage seeds range from $ 13/acre for ryegrass to $ 36/acre for rye or triticale.  Fertilizer ranges from $ 110 to $ 160/acre.  Add in labor and fuel, and the total cost of winter pasture can range from $ 190 to $ 260 per acre. This type of investment  in winter grazing must provide additional returns, such as labor savings, greater weight gains, and an extended grazing season.  This is the annual dilemma of whether to plant winter annuals or feed hay and supplement with grain or byproducts.  Every year is different, and weather plays a huge role in the success of the winter grazing season. One often overlooked factor that is critical to the success and feasibility of winter grazing is utilizing the correct stocking rate, and knowing how much a given area can produce.

Winter forage systems in Northwest Florida have traditionally relied on oats and ryegrass the with the occasional use of legumes, such as crimson clover.  The use of more drought and disease tolerant species, such as rye or triticale, is becoming more popular in dry-land beef-forage systems. Recent research conducted at the North Florida Research and Education Center, document additional weight gains on yearling heifers when rye and triticale where planted in blends with ryegrass.  The rye-ryegrass blend improved average daily weight gains (ADG) 1.1 lbs./day,  and the triticale-ryegrass 2.4 lbs./day during the last 28 days of grazing. This added performance is due to the excellent protein and energy content of the small grains. Whether for replacement heifers or lactating cows, this added performance can truly make the investment worthwhile.

Estimating the optimal stocking rate is necessary to determine how many acres of winter grazing to plant. To address this issue, the University of Florida – Feed Efficiency Facility (UF-FEF) in Marianna was utilized to determine the intake of fresh winter  forages fed free-choice. The UF-FEF is equipped with a system that allows the determination of individual animal feed intake.  Winter forages were cut fresh every day and fed to heifers (803 lb. in average) in the UF-FEF in order to estimate feed intakes under simulated grazing conditions.  In winter grazing situations, feed intake is limited by the gut fill of the animal, due to the bulkiness of the forage.  It is for this reason that daily dry matter (DM) intakes of around 1 to 1.5% of their body weight (BW) are common in cattle grazing a ryegrass pasture, while feed intakes of around 2 to 2.5% of their BW are common in cattle consuming free-choice hay.  The amount of water consumed with the forage limits the amount of nutrients consumed.  When forages have a low DM content (20% or less) a good rule of thumb is to estimate an intake of 9 to 10% of the animal’s BW in fresh (as is) forage. The table below was created with data from the University of Florida NFREC to provide a general idea of the number of grazing days provided, or an average stocking rate for winter forage pastures at different levels of productivity. Winter grazing is an excellent option for feeding cattle, but it does take some planning and preparation.

DiLorenzo Grazing Table

Grazing days and stocking rates allowed for cattle in winter pastures with different productivity levels. Data from NFREC studies was used to generate this table using the following assumptions: Daily intake = 10% (as fed basis) of body weight (BW); forage dry matter (DM) = 16%; forage waste due to cattle traffic = 20%; pasture growth rate = 60 lb DM/acre/day; minimum amount of forage needed not to limit animal performance = 1 lb of DM/lb of cattle BW.

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Author: ndilorenzo – ndilorenzo@ufl.edu

ndilorenzo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/10/12/winter-feeding-the-annual-dilemma/

Cool Season Forage Options for Winter Livestock Feeding

The latest long range forecast from NOAA is encouraging with at least average rainfall this winter.

 

Livestock feed prices have risen sharply due to the drought reduced corn crop in the Midwest.  What had been fairly reasonable by-product feeds several years ago, have risen to the point that many ranchers are strongly considering increasing the acreage of cool season forages for winter cattle feeding this year.  This week the Alabama Market News Service reported that bulk corn gluten feed was trading at $ 255-280 per ton, soybean hulls were $ 215-220 per ton, and whole cottonseed was $ 255-280 per ton.  But, these price quotes do not include the freight to have them hauled to the farm.

Many areas of the Panhandle saw a dramatic increase in rainfall through the summer, so soil moisture levels in most areas are high enough for getting cool season forages established.  The latest long range forecast from NOAA is also encouraging for at least average rainfall this winter.

All of these factors suggest that it may be a good year to invest in cool season forages, to grow your own feed and let the livestock do the harvesting and hauling.  If you are going to invest in winter forages, you want to select the varieties that have the best disease resistance and highest yield potential.  Below are the varieties that performed best over the last two years for Dr. Ann Blount at the North Florida Research and Education Center near Marianna.

 

Winter forage variety test results from UF/IFAS NFREC Marianna.

 

 

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2012/10/13/cool-season-forage-options-for-winter-livestock-feeding/