Tag Archive: Friday

Friday Feature: Preventing Needlestick Injuries to Ranch Hands

Friday Feature:  Preventing Needlestick Injuries to Ranch Hands

More than 80% of workers on livestock farms have accidentally stuck themselves with needles used for vaccine and drug administration.  Accidental needlestick injuries are usually minor, but can be serious with skin infections, allergic reactions, and deep tissue wounds that require surgery.   This week’s featured video was developed by the Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center (UMASH) to be used to provide employee training for dairy farm workers.  These same principles apply to workers on any type of livestock operation who are using disposable hypodermic needles for vaccine and drug administration.

Key Points to Emphasize with employees or family members regarding needle safety:

Don’t Get Stuck (Prevention)

  • Slow down and don’t rush injections

  • Restrain animals properly

  • Get help from coworkers to properly restrain animals before injection

  • Use good techniques and the correct equipment with every animal

  • Don’t remove needle caps with your mouth

  • Don’t recap used needles (Never try to reinsert used needles into the cap held in your mouth or hand)

  • Dispose of used needles in a rigid sharps disposal container

  • Discard bent, dull, or dirty needles that contact mud and manure

  • Don’t carry around syringes with needles in shirt or pants pockets while working with animals

  • Don’t dispose used needles into normal trash containers

Been Stuck (Care after accidental injection)

  • Stop working to provide care for the wound

  • Immediately wash skin thoroughly with soap and water

  • Apply topical disinfectant

  • Bandage puncture wound to prevent further contamination

  • Report injury to supervisor

  • Contact your health care provider to ensure tetnus vaccinations are current and to seek advice for wound care

To share this information with employees, print out the needlestick safety poster to display near chutes, handling facilities, and drug storage areas:

Don’t Get Stuck Needlestick Prevention Safety Poster

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If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/12/friday-feature-preventing-needlestick-injuries-to-ranch-hands/

Friday Feature: Large Scale Lettuce Production on Muck Soil near Belle Glade

Friday Feature:  Large Scale Lettuce Production on Muck Soil near Belle Glade

This week’s featured video was produced by Erin Freel to promote TKM Bengard Farms, Belle Glade.  This video highlights the four generations of the Basor family that produces 15 different types of lettuce and other produce in the rich, fertile muck soils just north of the Everglades.  This video highlights large scale vegetable production with 15 different harvest crews and 500-550 employees each day.

Video Link:  TKM Bengard Farms – Growers of Quality Lettuce in Belle Glade, Florida

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If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/04/friday-feature-large-scale-lettuce-production-on-muck-soil-near-belle-glade/

Friday Feature: The Dairy Heifers that Love Trombone Music

Friday Feature:  The Dairy Heifers that Love Trombone Music

Ed Henderson, Live Oak Dairy Farmer, plays his trombone for his Holstein heifers and they love it. Photo credit: Florida Dairy Farmers

Fifth-generation Florida dairy farmer, Ed Henderson owns the 6,800 head Shenandoah Dairy Farm near Live Oak, Florida.  He also loves to play jazz music with his trombone and stumbled across something very interesting;  His Holstein heifers love his music too!  This week’s featured video was produced by CNN that shows how his cows react when he serenades them with his trombone.


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If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

 

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/07/29/friday-feature-the-dairy-heifers-that-love-trombone-music/

Friday Feature: Hay Steamer

Friday Feature:  Hay Steamer

This week’s featured video has nothing to do with Florida farming or ranching, but I thought it was worth sharing because it showcases a farming innovation for a very different climate than the Southeast.  Recently more than 1,000 County Ag Agents from across the U.S. met in Salt Lake City, Utah for the annual National Association of County Agricultural Agents (NACAA) Conference.  One of the vendors who took part in the trade show there was Staheli West, the manufacturer of the “Dewpoint Hay Steamer.”  Learning about this equipment and the problem it addresses made me shake my head.  In the western states, where high quality alfalfa hay is produced on a wide scale, it can actually get too dry to bale hay.  In Utah and other desert climate states the morning dew is unpredictable.  All of their hay is grown with irrigation water; not from wells, but from reservoirs of melted mountain snow collected for use throughout the growing season.  In the heat of the summer it can get so hot and dry in Utah that the leaves fall off of alfalfa when it is baled with too little moisture.  A Utah farmer came up with the “Hay Steamer” to apply moisture just prior to baling to improve hay quality.  It just goes to show, there is no place that has perfect weather for producing hay.

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If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/07/21/friday-feature-hay-steamer/

Friday Feature: As Goes Agriculture, so Goes our Society

Friday Feature:  As Goes Agriculture, so Goes our Society

This week’s featured video was produced by Growing America.  In this video David Bridges, President of Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College summarizes the value of American Agriculture and the need to share this information with young people to encourage them to focus on careers in the agricultural industries.  He provides a great nugget of wisdom for perspective students, “Be a small part of something big, don’t focus on a big part of something small.”  His point is that jobs related to food production, processing, and distribution are in high demand.  With a degree in an agricultural science, graduates can play a role in the future of an industry essential to this country.  Dr. Bridges says it so well when he said, “Not only is agriculture a great way of life, but also a great career opportunity.”  This is a message that needs to be shared through social media, in agriculture education programs, and with the young people that we have the opportunity to influence.  The future of American Agriculture will be decided by the people we can recruit to invest their lives in careers that will play a small part in agriculture.

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If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/07/15/friday-feature-as-goes-agriculture-so-goes-our-society/

Friday Feature: The Peanut Program Works

Friday Feature:  The Peanut Program Works

This week’s featured video was developed by the Southern Peanut Farmers Federation.   They have launched  a campaign called The Peanut Program Works to provide support for the Price Loss Coverage or PLC Program implemented with the 2014 Farm Bill, as lawmakers begin to discuss the next Farm Bill.  This video features a number of Jackson County peanut farmers who took the time to share their thoughts about the need to continue with the PLC program as it is currently being implemented with  a $ 535 per ton reference price, a $ 355 per ton national loan rate, and a maximum $ 180.00 per ton PLC Payment.  The PLC Program was implemented to provide a support program that is directly related to market prices, so when the market is up the payments are decreased, and when the market is down, more support is provided.  However, this program is only provided for farms with  “base acres.”  The 2014 Farm Bill did not allow new base acres to be added, so that has created conflict for farms that began growing peanuts after 2002.

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If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/07/08/friday-feature-the-peanut-program-works/

Friday Feature: Tumblewheel Rolling Electric Fence

Friday Feature:  Tumblewheel Rolling Electric Fence

Last week we kicked off National Forage Week with a promotional video, so it seemed only fitting to end the celebration with an innovation for grazing management.  Intensive mob grazing, or strip grazing of annual pastures requires a good deal of time and management, if you have to continuously move fences to rotate cattle.  The Gallagher Tumblewheel system allows ranchers to move temporary electric fences with ease with no line or step-in posts.  This fence consists of a number of “hot” or electrified spoked, spacer wheels that hold up the fence, and roll making the fence simple and easy to move.  The wheels are held up by the tension of the hot-wire which passes through the center.  When one or both ends of the fence is moved, the wheels roll along.  Check out the video that shows how the system works and also explains how these spoked wheels stay hot to prevent cow damage without grounding out.

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If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/07/04/friday-feature-tumblewheel-rolling-electric-fence/

Friday Feature: The Cow Sprayer Automated Fly Control System

Friday Feature:  The Cow Sprayer Automated Fly Control System

Thanks to Nick Simmons, Escambia County Extension for sending in this week’s featured video.  This video highlights an innovation developed by Hue Fussell, a farmer in Ambrose, GA who invented “The Cow Sprayer.”  The Cow Sprayer automatically applies insecticide to every cow as they walk through a portable frame gate.  For just under $ 3,000 this solar powered system can be used to spray every cow in the herd without having to catch them in a squeeze chute or pen the cattle.  As they walk through the system voluntarily,  cows are gently sprayed individually.

 

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If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/07/03/friday-feature-the-cow-sprayer-automated-fly-control-system/

Friday Feature: The Riding Cow

For the past 18 months we have shared old farm jokes each week on Panhandle Ag e-news, but the well has about run dry.  Starting in 2017 we will be sharing interesting videos and stories related to agriculture.  If you come across a neat video or story, please send it in so we can share it with our readers.  Send a link to a video or article to:  Friday Features

The Riding Cow

Source – Good News Network

Hannah Simpson riding her family’s dairy cow. Source: Good News Network

When Hannah Simpson was 11-years-old, all she wanted was a horse of her own to ride and train. Her parents, however, insisted that ponies were too expensive, leaving Hannah’s dream unfulfilled.  Her creative solution? She trained one of the cows on their dairy farm to ride instead.  For the last seven years, Hannah has ridden her heifer Lilac through the meadows of the South Island town of Invercargill, in New Zealand.  Lilac has the capacity to jump up to 4.5 feet, but she prefers lazier activities like long bush walks and leisurely swims.

Hannah first climbed onto Lilac’s back on a dare from her brother, although the rider advises against most people attempting to mount a cow – Lilac has apparently bucked her off many times. But because of the duo’s rare bond, the two have defied the rules and become an unusual team.  Hannah now has a horse named Sammy, but she still takes her original steed out to pasture once a week for a ride.

Check out the video to see this amazing cow trainer:

 

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/14/friday-feature-the-riding-cow/

Friday Funny: Cowboy Ropes Bike Thief at Walmart

Friday Funny:  Cowboy Ropes Bike Thief at Walmart

cowboy-ropes-bike-thiefThis is not a joke.  This really happened!  An Oregon cowboy went to Walmart to get some dog food.  He heard a lady scream for help,  jumped on his horse, roped a bike thief in the Walmart parking lot,  and then called 911.  Check out the CBS News video.  The tape of the 911 call is hilarious.  Many times true stories are the funniest.

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If you enjoyed this week’s joke, you might also enjoy others from previous weeks: Friday Funnies

Farm folks always enjoy sharing good jokes, photos and stories.  If you have a good, clean joke, particularly one that pertains to agriculture, or a funny photo that you took on the farm, send it in and we will share it with our readers.

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/12/16/friday-funny-cowboy-ropes-bike-thief-at-walmart/

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