Tag Archive: Friday

Friday Feature: Protecting Hay Quality at Harvest

Friday Feature:  Protecting Hay Quality at Harvest

Massey Ferguson and Dr. Dennis Hancock, UGA Forage Extension Specialist have teamed up to produce a video series called “A Cut Above the Rest” with tips on how to harvest high quality hay.  In the first video Dr. Hancock explains RFQ (Relative Forage Quality) scores being used to evaluate the quality of hay of various types.  Both videos explain how cutting height, cutting speed, crop conditioning, tedding, and raking impact forage quality of hay at harvest time.  Check out these short videos that provide great tips for hay producers who are striving to harvest optimal quality forage for hay or baleage production.

Part 1 – Hay Cutting

 

Part 2 – Raking and Tedding

***********************************************************************************

If you enjoyed these videos, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

 

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/10/07/friday-feature-protecting-hay-quality-at-harvest/

Friday Feature: A Tribute to Bud Adams – One of Florida’s Greatest Cowmen

Friday Feature:  A Tribute to Bud Adams – One of Florida’s Greatest Cowmen

Florida has lost one of the all-time great cowmen and conservationists! Alto “Bud” Adams, Jr., passed away at the age of 91, on September 22, 2017, at his home on Adams Ranch near Ft. Pierce, Florida.  Bud Adams and his family have owned and managed the 50,000-acre, Adams Ranch since 1937. Adams Ranch is the 15th largest Cow-calf Operation in the US, managing a 10,000 head, brood cow herd.  Not only was Bud a cattlemen of great vision, but he was also nationally recognized for his efforts in land, water, and wildlife conservation.

As a tribute to Bud Adams, it seemed only fitting to share three videos that were produced to share the story of this historic Florida cattle family.

The first video was shared on an episode of America’s Heartland that was produced in 2011.

The next video was produced when Bud Adams was inducted into the Florida Agriculture Hall of Fame in 1999:

The third video was an episode of  The Ride with Cord McCoy that showcased the Adams Ranch with interesting interviews with Bud Adams and other ranch employees that was aired on RFD-TV on July 7, 2014 :

 

The following obituary was provided on the Adams Ranch website:

Bud Adams was born in Ft. Pierce April 4, 1926. For the next 91 years he lived a life everyone could envy, but only a few could handle. A Christian man, he taught his family and friends by example. He always had a firm handshake, and his word was his bond. His love for the outdoors, especially the Florida prairies and woodlands, were evident in not only his holistic approach to land management, but also his talent for photography. Mr. Bud could find God’s beauty in plants, animals and people, and was able to capture these images on film for the rest of us to enjoy. We are all grateful for his generosity and grace.

Bud traveled to Tallahassee and attended Leon High School while his father served on the Florida Supreme Court. At 18, he joined the US Navy at the end of WWII, and was part of our greatest generation. He graduated from the University of Florida. While a career in law or politics could have been in his future, Bud chose the life of a cowboy. He had fond memories of working alongside many of the founding families of modern day Florida, as well as of the many Seminole Indians he befriended as a young man in the days before fences. His father Judge Alto Adams made him a partner in the ranch in 1937 and Bud has run the ranch since 1948.

Bud was a proud member of the Florida Cattlemen’s Association, serving as President in 1958. For the last 59 years he had been a fixture at most every gathering of past-FCA Presidents, always offering kind advice to upcoming FCA leadership.

There are many things Bud was responsible for that will be around for generations to come. One is the Braford breed of cattle. Adams Ranch in Ft. Pierce is home to the foundation herd of this hearty breed. 5/8 Hereford and 3/8 Brahman, these red cattle quickly showed tolerance to Florida’s tropical climate, and flourished in the heat and rain. Mr. Bud was proud to say that if you bought one of his bred cattle, she would take care of the calf with no help needed from anyone. He was a founding member of the United Braford Breeders Association, located in Tyler, Texas.

Another monument to Bud’s life in agriculture is the land he bought, developed, managed and cared for. He was a pioneering advocate of conserving and protecting this land for future generations. His efforts and leadership have been awarded nationally. More importantly, when other landowners saw Bud endorsing and leading these conservation efforts, they were drawn to do the same through his trustworthy and honorable reputation. Bud has written three books describing his career as a rancher and steward of Florida lands.

***********************************************************************************

If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/30/friday-feature-a-tribute-to-bud-adams-one-of-floridas-greatest-cowmen/

Friday Feature: UF Ag Students Pitch In with Irma Recovery

Friday Feature:  UF Ag Students Pitch In with Irma Recovery

UF/IFAS Extension teamed up with students and faculty from the University of Florida College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and volunteers from the community to help a Pasco County blueberry farmer following Hurricane Irma.

Last week the featured video highlighted the terrible damage to the Citrus Industry in Southwest Florida caused by Hurricane Irma.  The damage from this storm was immense, but people all over the state are banding together to help people in need.  This week’s featured video, published by UF/IFAS News, shares how more than 200 volunteers from the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, and the local community gathered on a hot, windy Saturday to save thousands of blueberry bushes damaged by Hurricane Irma on Frogmore Fresh Farm in Pasco County.

Read the IFAS News article for more details on what took place:

UF students, faculty among hundreds who replanted blueberry bushes damaged by storm

***********************************************************************************

If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

 

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/23/friday-feature-uf-ag-students-pitch-in-with-irma-recovery/

Friday Feature: Hurricane Irma’s Impact on the Florida Citrus Industry Video

Friday Feature:  Hurricane Irma’s Impact on the Florida Citrus Industry Video

Citrus trees in Hendry County destroyed by Hurricane Irma. Credit: Gene McAvoy

This week’s featured video was a CBS News report on the damage from Hurricane Irma to Citrus in Southwest Florida.  The story features Paul Meador, Citrus Grower and Gene McAvoy, UF/IFAS Regional Vegetable Agent, who were out earlier this week assessing damage to crops and citrus in Hendry County.  McAvoy estimates there were more than $ 2 billion dollars in damages in Southwest Florida where the eye-wall of Hurricane Irma churned up groves, ranches, and vegetable farms.

 

***********************************************************************************

If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/15/friday-feature-hurricane-irmas-impact-on-the-florida-citrus-industry-video/

Friday Feature: Southeast Hay Contest Video

Friday Feature:  Southeast Hay Contest Video

The Southeast Hay Contest was started 14 years ago to showcase the excellent quality hay that is produced in the South.  If you take pride in producing high quality hay, this is an opportunity to see how the best hay you produce compares to other farms in the region.  This week’s featured video was produced by Massey Ferguson, the major sponsor of the contest, to help spread the word about the Southeast Hay Contest.

It is not too late to enter this year’s contest.  Contact your local County Extension Office and make an appointment to have your hay or balage tested.  Entries must be received by the UGA Forage Lab by 5:00 PM Thursday, September 21, 2017.  Entries must be signed by your local county agent to verify production.  Rules and entry information are all available on the SE Hay Contest website:  http://blog.caes.uga.edu/sehaycontest/  Winners will be recognized at the 40th annual Sunbelt Ag Expo, in Moultrie, GA on Tuesday, October 17th.

Hay and baleage samples will compete in the following seven categories:

***********************************************************************************

If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/09/08/friday-feature-southeast-hay-contest-video/

Friday Feature: The Gluten Free Issue

Friday Feature:  The Gluten Free Issue

David Schechter is a news reporter for WFAA News in Dallas Texas who likes to get answers to questions people have on hot topics through video segments he calls Verify.  This week’s featured video was a Verify segment David produced on the Gluten Free craze sweeping across America.  David does a great job interviewing experts that explain the truth about gluten and why this has become an issue for some American consumers, but also debunks some myths about modern wheat production.

***********************************************************************************

If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/26/friday-feature-the-gluten-free-issue/

Friday Feature: Mobile Drip Irrigation from Center Pivots

Friday Feature:  Mobile Drip Irrigation from Center Pivots

Dragon-line converts center pivots into mobile drip irrigation.

Water is a precious resource, no mater where you live or farm, but is especially true in Kansas where their aquifer is diminishing.  There is a relatively new technology being called mobile drip irrigation that has been developed in Kansas to make center pivot irrigation even more efficient, because water is released right on the soil surface through drip tubes to minimize evaporation.  This week’s featured video was developed by Dragon-Line to showcase their innovative approach to convert center pivot irrigation into drip irrigation.  A video viewer was not available for this video, so please use the following link:

What is Dragon Line Irrigation?

***********************************************************************************

If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/19/friday-feature-mobile-drip-irrigation-from-center-pivots/

Friday Feature: Preventing Needlestick Injuries to Ranch Hands

Friday Feature:  Preventing Needlestick Injuries to Ranch Hands

More than 80% of workers on livestock farms have accidentally stuck themselves with needles used for vaccine and drug administration.  Accidental needlestick injuries are usually minor, but can be serious with skin infections, allergic reactions, and deep tissue wounds that require surgery.   This week’s featured video was developed by the Upper Midwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center (UMASH) to be used to provide employee training for dairy farm workers.  These same principles apply to workers on any type of livestock operation who are using disposable hypodermic needles for vaccine and drug administration.

Key Points to Emphasize with employees or family members regarding needle safety:

Don’t Get Stuck (Prevention)

  • Slow down and don’t rush injections

  • Restrain animals properly

  • Get help from coworkers to properly restrain animals before injection

  • Use good techniques and the correct equipment with every animal

  • Don’t remove needle caps with your mouth

  • Don’t recap used needles (Never try to reinsert used needles into the cap held in your mouth or hand)

  • Dispose of used needles in a rigid sharps disposal container

  • Discard bent, dull, or dirty needles that contact mud and manure

  • Don’t carry around syringes with needles in shirt or pants pockets while working with animals

  • Don’t dispose used needles into normal trash containers

Been Stuck (Care after accidental injection)

  • Stop working to provide care for the wound

  • Immediately wash skin thoroughly with soap and water

  • Apply topical disinfectant

  • Bandage puncture wound to prevent further contamination

  • Report injury to supervisor

  • Contact your health care provider to ensure tetnus vaccinations are current and to seek advice for wound care

To share this information with employees, print out the needlestick safety poster to display near chutes, handling facilities, and drug storage areas:

Don’t Get Stuck Needlestick Prevention Safety Poster

************************************************************************************

If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/12/friday-feature-preventing-needlestick-injuries-to-ranch-hands/

Friday Feature: Large Scale Lettuce Production on Muck Soil near Belle Glade

Friday Feature:  Large Scale Lettuce Production on Muck Soil near Belle Glade

This week’s featured video was produced by Erin Freel to promote TKM Bengard Farms, Belle Glade.  This video highlights the four generations of the Basor family that produces 15 different types of lettuce and other produce in the rich, fertile muck soils just north of the Everglades.  This video highlights large scale vegetable production with 15 different harvest crews and 500-550 employees each day.

Video Link:  TKM Bengard Farms – Growers of Quality Lettuce in Belle Glade, Florida

************************************************************************************

If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/04/friday-feature-large-scale-lettuce-production-on-muck-soil-near-belle-glade/

Friday Feature: The Dairy Heifers that Love Trombone Music

Friday Feature:  The Dairy Heifers that Love Trombone Music

Ed Henderson, Live Oak Dairy Farmer, plays his trombone for his Holstein heifers and they love it. Photo credit: Florida Dairy Farmers

Fifth-generation Florida dairy farmer, Ed Henderson owns the 6,800 head Shenandoah Dairy Farm near Live Oak, Florida.  He also loves to play jazz music with his trombone and stumbled across something very interesting;  His Holstein heifers love his music too!  This week’s featured video was produced by CNN that shows how his cows react when he serenades them with his trombone.


************************************************************************************

If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across a humorous video or interesting story related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

 

 

PG

Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/07/29/friday-feature-the-dairy-heifers-that-love-trombone-music/

Older posts «