Tag Archive: Healthy

Small Steps Are the Key to Healthy Change

drinking waterOliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. once said, “The greatest thing in the world is not so much where we are, but in which direction we are moving.” That saying holds true when it comes to our health and our finances.

Health and personal financial issues affect millions of Americans. We struggle with epidemic obesity rates, over 79 million Americans have “pre-diabetes”, debt and bankruptcy filings remain high and millions of Americans live on the “financial edge” with less than the recommended three months’ emergency fund set aside for the future. Problems that develop gradually soon become overwhelming.

Many of us, when faced with the need to change, see our problems as unbeatable and “freeze” instead of moving forward. It is true that there is no easy way to lose weight, gain wealth or become debt-free. Even drastic fixes like weight loss surgery or bankruptcy come with huge risks. So, what is the secret?

According to Former HHS Secretary Tommy G.Thompson, small steps are the key! Mr. Thompson stated, “Consumers don’t need to go to extremes – such as joining a gym or taking part in the latest diet plan – to make improvements to their health. But they do need to get active and eat healthier.” No step is too small to get started and you can never be too early or too late. Examples might include walking during your lunch break, cutting out 100 calories a day, saving the change you accumulate each day or tracking your spending for a month. Anything you do daily over a period of time will soon become a habit, or an “automated” behavior. When your healthy behaviors become automated – no matter how small – you’ve just taken a step toward physical and/or financial wellness.

In the end, your health is in your hands. Set realistic goals, take small steps to reach them, learn from the obstacles and believe that you can achieve. And remember, “In the end, the only people who fail are those who do not try.” – David Viscott

 

Adapted from Small Steps to Health and Wealth, B. O’Neill and K. Ensle, 2013.

PG

Author: Ginny Hinton – ghinton@ufl.edu

Santa Rosa County Extension Agent with UF/IFAS. Focus areas include nutrition, food safety, injury prevention, and healthy families. Bachelor’s degree in Social Work from University of West Florida. Master’s degree in Public Health/Health Education from University of South Florida.
http://santarosa.ifas.ufl.edu

Ginny Hinton

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/04/01/small-steps-are-the-key-to-healthy-change/

Packing a Healthy School Lunch

Healthy school lunch

Packing the kids’ lunches for school means you know which nutritious foods they are eating. Here are some budget-friendly, creative ideas to keep kids happy and healthy at lunchtime.

Make a “Smarter” Sandwich:

While some kids prefer the same thing every day, others may be okay with a slight switch to their sandwich.

  • Use different breads like 100% whole wheat tortilla wraps (choose wraps low in saturated and made with no hydrogenated oils) or 100% whole wheat pita pockets.
  • Besides lettuce, try shredded carrots or avocado slices with a turkey sandwich.
  • Buy blocks of low fat, low-sodium cheeses. You save money when you slice it yourself. Or use a cookie cutter to cut into fun shapes.
  • Instead of lunch meat, try a leftover grilled chicken sandwich with lettuce and tomato.

 

Love Those Leftovers:

Try using the leftovers from the family dinner for the next day’s lunch. Invest in a thermos to keep foods hot or cold until lunchtime.

  • Low-sodium tomato, vegetable or bean soups
  • Chili made with lean or extra lean ground turkey
  • Whole wheat spaghetti with low sodium tomato sauce
  • Low-sodium baked beans, bean casserole or beans & rice

 

Let Them Dunk:

Sometimes it is okay to let your kids play with their food, especially when they are getting extra nutrition.

  • Apple and pear slices to dip into low-fat plain yogurt mixed with peanut butter.
  • Carrot, celery and sweet pepper strips to dip into hummus, fresh salsa or homemade bean dip.
  • Whole grain crackers (choose crackers low in sodium and saturated fat and made without hydrogenated oils) to dunk into low-sodium vegetable or tomato soup.
  • Unsalted sunflower seeds, crushed whole wheat cereal and sliced banana to mix into low fat vanilla yogurt (no added sugars) to eat with a spoon like a sundae.

 

Get Them Involved:

While letting kids in the kitchen might mean a bigger mess, if they help pack their own lunch, they are more likely to eat it! On nights you have a bit more time, like a Sunday night, have them choose which piece of fruit or what type of whole grain bread they want and let them assemble their lunch. Make this a weekly routine – it’s another great way to spend family time together.

For more heart healthy lunch tips visit: www.heart.org

PG

Author: Melanie Taylor – metaylor@ufl.edu

Melanie Taylor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/09/11/packing-a-healthy-school-lunch-2/

Packing a Healthy School Lunch

Healthy School Lunch

Healthy School Lunch

Packing the kids’ lunches for school means you know which nutritious foods they are eating. Here are some budget-friendly, creative ideas to keep kids happy and healthy at lunchtime.

Make a “Smarter” Sandwich:

While some kids prefer the same thing every day, others may be okay with a slight switch to their sandwich.

  • Use different breads like 100% whole wheat tortilla wraps (choose wraps low in saturated and made with no hydrogenated oils) or 100% whole wheat pita pockets.
  • Besides lettuce, try shredded carrots or avocado slices with a turkey sandwich.
  • Buy blocks of low fat, low-sodium cheeses. You save money when you slice it yourself. Or use a cookie cutter to cut into fun shapes.
  • Instead of lunchmeat, try a leftover grilled chicken sandwich with lettuce and tomato.

Love Those Leftovers:

Try using the leftovers from the family dinner for the next day’s lunch. Invest in a thermos to keep foods hot or cold until lunchtime.

  • Low-sodium tomato, vegetable or bean soups
  • Chili made with lean or extra lean ground turkey
  • Whole wheat spaghetti with low sodium tomato sauce
  • Low-sodium baked beans, bean casserole or beans & rice

Let Them Dunk:

Sometimes it is okay to let your kids play with their food, especially when they are getting extra nutrition.

  • Apple and pear slices to dip into low-fat plain yogurt mixed with peanut butter.
  • Carrot, celery and sweet pepper strips to dip into hummus, fresh salsa or homemade bean dip.
  • Whole grain crackers (choose crackers low in sodium and saturated fat and made without hydrogenated oils) to dunk into low-sodium vegetable or tomato soup.
  • Unsalted sunflower seeds, crushed whole wheat cereal and sliced banana to mix into low fat vanilla yogurt (no added sugars) to eat with a spoon like a sundae.

Get Them Involved:

While letting kids in the kitchen might mean a bigger mess, if they help pack their own lunch, they are more likely to eat it! On nights you have a bit more time, like a Sunday night, have them choose which piece of fruit or what type of whole grain bread they want and let them assemble their lunch. Make this a weekly routine – it’s another great way to spend family time together.

For more heart healthy lunch tips visit: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/

PG

Author: Melanie Taylor – metaylor@ufl.edu

Melanie Taylor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/08/29/packing-a-healthy-school-lunch/

3 Ways You Can Help Keep Our Bays Healthy

3 Ways You Can Help Keep Our Bays Healthy

Following a previous article on the number of ways you can help sea turtles, this week we will look at ways that local residents can help keep our waterways clean. Poor water quality is a concern all over the country, and so it is locally as well. When we have heavy rain all sorts of products wash off into streams, rivers, bays, and bayous. The amount and impact of these products vary but most environmental scientists will agree that one of biggest problems is excessive nutrients.

 

Marine science students monitoring nutrient levels in a local waterway.  Photo: Ed Bauer

Marine science students monitoring nutrient levels in a local waterway. Photo: Ed Bauer

Nutrient runoff comes in many forms. Most think of fertilizers we use on our lawns but it also includes grass clippings, leaf litter, and animal waste. These organic products contain nitrogen and phosphorus which, in excess, can trigger algal blooms in the bay. These algal blooms could contain toxic forms of microscopic plants that cause red tide but more often they are nontoxic and cause the water to become turbid (murky) which can reduce sunlight reaching the bottom, stressing seagrasses. When these algal blooms eventually die they are consumed by bacteria which require oxygen to complete the process. This can cause the dissolved oxygen concentrations to drop low enough to trigger fish kills. This process is called eutrophication. In addition to this, animal waste from birds and mammals contain fecal coliform bacteria. These bacteria are used as indicators of animal waste levels and can be high enough to require health advisories to be issued.

 

So what we can do about this?

 

  1. We can start with landscaping with native plants to your area. Our barrier islands are xeric environments (desert-like). Most of our native plants can tolerate low levels of rain and high levels of salt spray. If used in your yard they will require less watering and fertilizing, which saves the homeowner money. It also reduces the amount of fertilizer that can reach the bay.
  2. If you choose to use nonnative plants you should have your soil tested to determine which fertilizer, and how much, should be applied. You can have your soil tested at your county Extension Office for a small fee. Knowing your soil composition will ensure that the correct fertilizer, and the correct amount, will be used. Again, this reduces the amount reaching the bay and saving the home owner money.
  3. Where ever water is discharged into the bay you can plant what is called a Living Shoreline. A Living Shoreline is a buffer of native marsh grasses that can consume the nutrients before they reach the bay and also reducing the amount of sediment that washes off as well, reducing the turbidity problem many of our seagrasses are facing.

These three practices will help reduce nutrient runoff. In addition to lowering the nutrient level in the bays it will also reduce the amount of freshwater that enters. Decrease salinity and increase turbidity may be the cause of the decline of several species once common here; such as scallops and horseshoe crabs. Florida Sea Grant is currently working with local volunteers to monitor terrapins, horseshoe crabs, and scallops in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties. We are also posting weekly water quality data on our website every weekend. You can find each week’s numbers at http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu. If you have any questions about soil testing, landscaping, living shorelines, or wildlife monitoring contact Rick O’Connor at roc1@ufl.edu. Help us improve water quality in our local waters.

PG

Author: Rick O’Connor – roc1@ufl.edu

Sea Grant Extension Agent in Escambia County

Rick O’Connor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/05/15/3-ways-you-can-help-keep-our-bays-healthy/

Busy People Need to Eat Healthy, Too!

Prepare a shopping list

It seems that we are rushing here and there, doing things at the speed of light. We may find ourselves consumed by work, meetings, school, sports practice for the kids… an endless list of things to keep us active, stressed, and often frantic.

Life has become so busy that we often forget to take care of ourselves, which can dramatically increase the risk of preventable chronic diseases. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), chronic diseases such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and type-2 diabetes accounted for over 26% of deaths in the United States in 2013. Chronic stress, combined with poor planning, can likely lead to unhealthy exercise and eating habits for yourself and your family.

Planning ahead is critical in side-stepping the impacts of poor nutrition and obesity-related chronic diseases.

Follow these simple tips:

  • Plan meals (including brown-bag lunches and snacks) you and your family like that include lean protein, whole grains, low-fat dairy, and lots of fruits and vegetables.
  • Save time and money by making a grocery list before going to the store.
  • Be a master planner! Save your weekly meal plans and grocery lists to use again another week.
  • Avoid take-out and make foods that you can bring to work the next day for lunch.
  • Avoid the vending machine and bring snacks to work like nuts, fresh or dried fruit, or whole-grain crackers and hummus.
  • Don’t forget to eat breakfast! A quick bowl of cereal with low-fat milk and a small cup of orange juice can help you make it to lunchtime.
  • Carry a tumbler! Fill up on water all day, anywhere and everywhere, to keep you hydrated and help you to avoid sugary drinks and sodas.

Make sure to plan time each day to be active. Taking short walks and stretching at your desk can make a world of difference in your health and attitude. For additional information on healthy eating, please visit ChooseMyPlate.gov and Nutrition.gov.

 

PG

Author: amymullins – amymullins@ufl.edu

Amy Mullins is a Family and Consumer Sciences Agent responsible for coordinating the Adult Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program in Leon County. Amy is a Registered Dietitian and a graduate of The University of Florida and Florida State University.

amymullins

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/03/23/busy-people-need-to-eat-healthy-too/

Living Soils Foster Healthy Farms

Living Soils Foster Healthy Farms

Full Earth Farm - Carrots in Soil Profile

Promote healthy soils to secure the health of the many fruits and vegetables your farm grows.

For small-scale farmers relying on cover crops and compost to fulfill their garden’s nutritional needs, it is important to remember healthy soil requires “life.”  What is it that separates soil that can support fruit and vegetable production from soil that cannot? The answer is in the microbiology or microscopic life forms of the soil.  As soil transitions from being impoverished to being enriched, many microscopic living entities will form complex ecosystems.

Just a teaspoon of healthy topsoil can contain up to one billion bacteria and numerous other microorganisms such as fungi, protozoa, and nematodes. As a small-scale farmer, you can obtain and support these beneficial microorganisms within your agricultural production by increasing the organic matter content of your soil.  The organic matter also supplies a slow-release nutrient source for your fruits and vegetables.

Microorganisms will develop your soil by providing soil structure, aeration, and the conversion of insoluble nutrients into soluble, plant-available forms. When soil microorganisms decompose organic matter, they create soil aggregates. The soil aggregates will reduce soil compaction and greatly increase porosity for strong root growth, aeration, and improved drainage.

The portion of organic matter known as humus is very beneficial. Humus decomposes very slowly, and is comprised of many complex organic compounds, including lignin, protein, and sugars that will enhance your soil’s physical and chemical properties. This part of organic matter is the glue that binds the small soil aggregates, providing micro, meso, and macro (small, medium, and large) pore space for improved infiltration, but also enhanced soil water retention. Humus will provide a slow-release nutrient source, as it has a very large surface area capable of retaining many essential nutrients imperative for plant development. Humus acts as a soil buffer, which helps maintain proper soil pH, and can also bind heavy metals which otherwise may cause plant metal toxicities.

Microorganisms such as rhizobia bacteria and mycorrhizae fungi provide direct benefits to your farm by their reciprocal interactions (symbiotic relationships) with leguminous crops for atmospheric nitrogen fixation. This essentially provides free fertilizer, so be sure to include legumes within your crop rotation. Soil also provides an excellent habitat for beneficial nematodes. Although the plant-parasitic types give nematodes a bad reputation, most soil nematodes are actually free-living and can be very valuable for their ability to decompose organic matter.

By adding compost and incorporating cover crops and organic mulch, you can encourage a favorable environment for life. It is also important to keep the soil properly irrigated and aerated, as all life requires water and most good bacteria are aerobic and therefore require oxygen. Many pesticide applications can negatively affect diverse microorganism populations, and should be kept at a minimum if your goal is to build strong microorganism populations. Although plastic mulch can be useful for growing many crops, avoid excessive use in one location, as it can reduce air flow and can disturb the formation of organic matter.

For small-scale farmers that rely upon compost and cover crops to meet their crops’ nutritional needs, it is imperative to maintain all of the components that life requires, including food, water, and air. This will promote soil microbial diversity, and therefore a complex food web, which will assist in combating crop pests and diseases, which are numerable in the Southeast’s humid climate. By securing the health of your soil, you are also actively securing the health of the many fruits and vegetables your farm will be able to produce for years to come.

For more information on this topic, please see the following UF/IFAS Publication:

Soils & Fertilizers for Master Gardeners: Organisms in the Soil

 

PG

Author: mjameson – mjameson@ufl.edu

mjameson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/02/14/living-soils-foster-healthy-farms/

Healthy Holiday Eating for Diabetics

sugar cookies_3Eat, drink, be happy and be healthy this holiday season. My favorite holidays are just around the corner. It is an exciting time to be with family and friends. There is usually lots of food that may come with lots of calories and carbohydrates. Are you wondering how to survive this holiday season without adding more calories and carbohydrates to your diet?

The first thing to keep in mind is to plan your meals to help keep your diabetes management on track. Persons with diabetes should space out their carbohydrate intake throughout the day. Fruits, starchy vegetables, dairy foods, and grain foods all contain carbohydrates. Eating the right amount of carbohydrates throughout the day will help you control your blood glucose levels. The Idaho Plate method of meal planning is one of many tools to help control carbohydrates while recommending at least one-half your plate consist of vegetables. More information on the Idaho Plate can be found at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fy334 .

If you going to a party or eating at a friend or relative’s home and the meal time is around your normal dinner time, try to eat the same amount of carbohydrate that you normally would eat. You may ask your host if you can bring a covered dish. If so, take your favorite low carbohydrate dish to share.

Avoid or limit the amount of sugary drinks like soda, fruit punch or drinks, sweet tea and eggnog. These drinks raises blood glucose and can provide lots of calories in one serving. For example, one cup of fruit punch contains 100 calories or more and at least 30 grams of carbohydrate; and, one cup of eggnog may have as many as 344 calories and more than 34 grams of carbohydrates. A much better choice is to choose diet or other low-calorie drinks that are available in several flavors. Remember, water is a much healthier choice and has no calories.

Fill up on salad first. Filling up on salad or other raw veggies will fill you up without lots of calories.

Don’t forget to focus on conversation. Make an effort to meet new friends or circulate with those you know instead of eyeing the food.

Stay active this holiday season. Put yourself on your gift list by treating yourself to a personal trainer, fitness class series or membership to a gym.

Learn more about how you can enjoy eating healthy as a diabetic this holiday season by contacting your local UF/IFAS Extension Office .

 

PG

Author: Marjorie Moore – mreem@ufl.edu

Marjorie Moore is the Director/Extension Faculty in Family & Consumer Sciences for Bay County.
http://bay.ifas.ufl.edu

Marjorie Moore

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/11/22/healthy-holiday-eating-for-diabetics/

Back To School ~ Healthy Lunchbox Hints

Back To School ~ Healthy Lunchbox Hints

LunchesIt’s time to start getting backpacks ready, lunches packed and kids off to school. Back to school time is the perfect time to start packing a healthier lunchbox. Packing your child’s lunch may contribute to the difficulties of getting out the door in the morning but it does not have to. You know your child better than anyone, their likes and dislikes, so go with what you know.

The first step to packing a lunch is to determine how much food is enough for your child. You will know you did not pack enough when they come home and tell you they ate all their food and are still hungry. Likewise, if you pack too much, you will know by seeing uneaten or half-eaten items in their lunch box at the end of the day. Start by packing between 3 and 6 items. They will have enough variety in their lunch box to sustain them throughout the school day without too much waste. MyPlate.gov is a great resource for building a balanced meal (protein, vegetable, fruit, grain, dairy).

Secondly, pack as much as you can the night before. This will decrease morning stress. Cut up fruits and vegetables and store in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Cut up fresh ingredients for sandwiches, if required. Make up cracker or dried fruit packs. Wrap up home-baked treats and place in the lunch box.

Lastly, keep in mind this food safety tip: Include gel ice packs to keep refrigerated food cold. Refrigerated food shouldn’t be above 40 degrees for more than 4 hours due to increased bacterial growth causing possible illness.

Lunchbox Meal Ideas:
1.) Wheat crackers, cheese cubes, deli meat, strawberries/blueberries, snap peas (with their favorite dipping sauce*)
2.) Mini quiche, carrots, celery with peanut butter and raisins, whole fruit (pear, orange, banana)

*Want something to dip kid-friendly veggies in besides ranch? Try low-fat Greek yogurt, hummus, or this cottage cheese veggie dip:
1/2 cup low-fat cottage cheese
1/4 teaspoon lemon pepper
Enjoy with baby carrots, snow/snap peas, bell pepper strips

Snack Ideas:
1.) Whole wheat pita cut into wedges with 2 tablespoons hummus for dip
2.) Trail mix: mix 20 almonds, miniature box of raisins, and ¼ cup sunflower seeds

For additional information on creating nutritious meals, contact your local Extension office.

PG

Author: Ricki McWilliams – rickim@ufl.edu

Ricki McWilliams is the Family & Consumer Sciences Agent in Walton County, Florida.

Ricki McWilliams

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/09/06/back-to-school-healthy-lunchbox-hints/

Nutrition Program Encourages Healthy, Budget-Friendly Family Meals

Parents and guardians across America work hard everyday to put food in the mouths of their families.  We all have to make choices in the foods we eat and provide for our children.  This process of planning, shopping, and preparing healthy meals is challenging, but especially for those that have limited income and resources.  These families that struggle for food security put themselves at risk for a host of nutrition-related chronic diseases including obesity, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes.

EFNEP

EFNEP teaches families how to shop for healthy foods, plan and cook meals, save money on food purchases, and incorporate physical activity into their lives.

Over 26% of Leon County’s population is living below the poverty level, which is much higher than the 16.5% of Florida’s total population.  In addition, a relationship between income level and overweight status has been established.  Of the adults in our county that make less than $ 25,000 per year, over 70% of them are overweight or obese.  These are scary statistics that bring the problems of poor nutrition and limited-income to light.

Having access to nutritious food is a good first step toward putting healthy meals on the family’s table.  Surprisingly, only 77% of eligible Floridians in 2010 asked for and received assistance through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).  Sadly, it seems that a very large number of eligible Floridians are not getting the help that they need to feed their families.

How can parents and caregivers make the most of their food budget and make healthier choices when planning, shopping, and preparing meals?  This is where nutrition education can play a key role to ultimately improve the diet and health of the total family.  The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) is offered in over 10 counties in Florida, including Leon County, and is designed to empower families to practice and adopt positive nutrition and lifestyle behaviors.  Classes are free and consist of a series of 8 interactive lessons that teach adult participants how to shop for healthy foods, plan and cook meals, save money on food purchases, and incorporate physical activity into their lives.

Classes are offered throughout the county at various community sites.  If you are interested in starting a class with your group, church, or worksite, or to find out more information about EFNEP, contact Amy Mullins, Registered Dietitian and Family and Consumer Sciences Agent at UF IFAS Leon County Extension, amymullins@ufl.edu or 850-606-5203.  Learn more about SNAP eligibility and benefits by visiting http://www.fns.usda.gov/

EFNEP logo

 

PG

Author: amymullins – amymullins@ufl.edu

Amy Mullins is a Family and Consumer Sciences Agent respnsible for coordinating the Adult Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program in Leon County. Amy is a Registered Dietitian and a graduate of The University of Florida and Florida State University.

amymullins

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/05/13/nutrition-program-encourages-healthy-budget-friendly-family-meals/

Keep the Holidays Healthy

healthy holidaysThe Season of Hallothanksmas is upon us. Yes, I know what you’re thinking:  treats, meats, and delicious eats. But let’s shift our way of thinking. What if we turn our focus to family, friends, and making great memories? Here are three things to think about this holiday season:

1. Portion control – Have you noticed how portion sizes keep getting bigger with the option to “super-size?” Some portion sizes have increased so much that they now equal the amount recommended for the entire day. With this growth have come increases in waistlines and body weight. Start with figuring out how big your portions really are. Pour/place in a dish the amount you would normally eat then use a measuring cup to find out how much you are actually eating. Take the Portion Distortion Quiz now.

Basic guidelines when measuring portions:

1 cup = baseball

½ cup = light bulb

1 oz or 2 tbsp = golf ball

1 tbsp = poker chip

3 oz chicken or meat =deck of cards

3 oz fish = checkbook

2. Some easy ways to keep your commitment to healthful eating:  Pack your shopping cart with plenty of fresh vegetables like sweet potatoes, winter squash, broccoli, carrots, and green beans. Apples, cranberries, and pears combine easily for a tasty salad, fruit crisp, or topping for the turkey. Reduce fat and calories without sacrificing the taste with these quick substitutions:  two egg whites for one egg; low-sodium, fat-free broth in your mashed potatoes; cutting back on added butter or margarine; applesauce for oil, margarine, or butter when baking. Use fat-free yogurt, sour cream, and whipped topping for dips, sauces, and pie toppings. Try sliced almonds in place of fried onion rings for a crunchy topping.  Replace regular with reduced-fat or low-fat cheese for salads and casseroles. Substituting ingredients can change the texture of the finished product so be sure to start with small changes.

3. Going to a gathering? With a little preparation, you can still keep off the extra holiday pounds. If you plan on treating yourself later, start your day with a small meal that includes whole grains, fruit, low-fat or fat-free dairy, and protein like eggs, ham, or peanut butter. Don’t starve yourself beforehand. Rather, eat a small, lower-calorie meal or snack so you don’t overdo it at the party. Choose carefully and decide among foods you definitely will eat, those you will sample, and those you will skip. Don’t rush to eat. Socialize and settle into the festivities before you eat. Move your socializing away from the buffet or appetizer trays so you don’t nibble unconsciously.

Sources: www.eatright.org; http://myplate.gov/

 

PG

Author: Ricki McWilliams – rickim@ufl.edu

Ricki McWilliams is the Family & Consumer Sciences Agent in Walton County, Florida.

Ricki McWilliams

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/11/16/keep-the-holidays-healthy/

Older posts «