Tag Archive: June

4-H Horse Health Clinic Scheduled for June 13th

The Area A 4-H Horse Advisory Committee is pleased to welcome Dr. Bess Darrow, DVM and Mr. Billy Blackman, Professional Farrier to our first Area A 4-H Equine Clinic.  Our focus will be on overall equine health, as well as dental and hoof concerns.  There is no fee for this clinic but you must register on Eventbrite by June 5th. Lunch is provided for current 4-H members.

After the workshop, participants may make appointments and bring their horses to have dental and hoof work done.  *Fees will apply. To make appointments you will need to contact Dr. Darrow or Mr. Blackman personally (see flyer for contact information.)

The Area A Horse Advisory Committee is planning a series of both educational and competitive events for youth enrolled in the 4-H Horse and “Horse-less” Horse Projects this coming 4-H year!  For more information about the Florida 4-H Horse Program, contact your local UF/IFAS County Extension Office or visit one of these links:

Florida 4-H Horse Project Page

Florida 4-H Horse Events (UF IFAS Animal Sciences)

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Author: amgranger – amgranger@ufl.edu

amgranger

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/05/04/4-h-horse-health-clinic-scheduled-for-june-13th/

June Panhandle Weather Summary

June Panhandle Weather Summary

NWS June 16 rainfall estimatesJune 2016 was fairly typical for the Florida Panhandle with much warmer temperatures and scattered afternoon thunderstorms with highly variable rainfall.  In the graphic above you can see the hot pink areas that received more than 10″ and dark red regions that received more than 8″ in June.  In contrast the beige areas received less than 5″ and the tan less than 4″ of rain in June.

16 Jan-Jun Panhandle RainfallThe six Florida Automated Weather Network (FAWN) stations also showed the variation in rainfall across the Panhandle in June 2016.  Monticello had a surprisingly wet month with over 9″ collected, while only 3.5″ fell near Marianna, less than 100 miles to the west.  Because of the extra rainfall in April and June, Monticello received 37.7″ which was 9″ above the historical average for that location.  Through the first half of 2016,  Marianna had the lowest total through June with only 26.6″ which was 1.5″ below the historic average for that location.  The other four stations were above average through the first six months of 2016.

16 Jan-Jun Marianna FAWN ChartTemperatures certainly warmed up significantly in June with a 7° increase in the average air temperature as compared to May, and a 5° increase in average soil temperature.  There were 3 days in June with high temperatures over 95°, with a high of 97° on June 25, 2016. For daily totals download the 2016 Marianna Jan-Jun Weather Summary.

3 Month Outlook

16 July through September OutlookThe Climate Prediction Center’s (CPC) forecast for the next three months, July through September, calls for above average temperatures and above average rainfall.  Hopefully there will be adequate rainfall to compensate for the higher temperatures.  With most of the Panhandle above average so far, it should turn out to be a pretty decent crop year.  To this point Florida has stayed out of the US Drought Monitor, hopefully that trend will continue.

 

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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/07/16/june-panhandle-weather-summary/

Forestry Seminar June 30

Forestry Seminar June 30

Forestry Seminar header

Forestry SeminarForestry Harvest photo

Thursday, June 30, 2016
Walton County Extension Office

9:45 am2:00 pm

Come learn about the latest on forest herbicides, cogon grass control, predicting future growth of your southern pines, cost-share programs and grazing livestock in the pines.

AgendaCogongrass UGA Bugwood

  • 9:45 – Registration
  • 10:00 – Welcome, Introductions – Mike Goodchild, Walton County Extension Director
  • 10:15 – Growth and Yield Model for Southern Pines – Dr. Jarek Nowak
  • 11:15 – Farm Service Agency Update – Daina Odom, FSA County Executive Director
  • 11:30 – Natural Resource Conservation Service Update – NRCS District Conservationist
  • 11:45 – Florida Forest Service, Cost Share Update- Daniel Stevens, Region 1 CFA Coordinator
  • 12:00 – Lunch- sponsored by Farm Credit of Northwest Florida
  • 12:30 – Cogongrass control update, Use of forest herbicides for forest management- Dr. Pat Minogue, UF, Forestry Extension Specialist
  • 1:30 – Longleaf Understory Management with Cattle- Charles Simon, Covington County Extension Coordinator
  • 2:00 – Participant Discussion, Adjourn

Download the printer friendly flyer:  2016 Walton County Forestry Seminar

Cost $ 5includes lunch

RSVP by Wednesday, June 27
Call 850-892-8172 or email: haneyc@ufl.edu

For more information:

Mike Goodchild
UF / IFAS Walton County Extension
732 N. 9th Street
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433
(850) 892-8172

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Author: Michael Goodchild – mjgo@ufl.edu

Michael Goodchild County Extension Director Walton County (forestry)

Michael Goodchild

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/06/18/forestry-seminar-june-30/

Horse Genetics Online Extension Course begins June 27

Equine genetics course headerIntroducing a new Extension Course:  Horse Genetics

Location: 100% Internet based course

Certificate of completion awarded at the conclusion of the course!

Instructor: Dr. Samantha Brooks

Teaching Assistant: Laura Patterson Rosa, DVM

Cost: $ 200.00

Course Description: The art of horse breeding has shaped equine genetics since domestication, yet most horse professionals have little understanding of the fundamentals of genetics. In this six-week, online extension course we will examine the underlying mechanisms and inheritance of a number of traits in the horse. Concepts covered will include coat color, genetic disease, parentage testing and some insights on complex traits of performance and behavior.

Target Audience: Horse breeders, equestrian enthusiasts, people working in the field of Veterinary, Animal Sciences or Biology, horse trainers and equestrian professionals. Anyone interested in gaining a better understanding of the horse genetics field.

Class Dates: June 27 to August 5, 2016

Course Objectives: This short extension course focuses on making recent developments in horse genetics accessible and applicable for the everyday horse person. Although some prior knowledge in basic genetics is helpful, it’s not essential for completing this course. At the conclusion of this course students will have the ability to:

  • Use the principles of inheritance to predict phenotype, based on genotype.
  • Evaluate pedigree records for genetic health as well as marketability.
  • Describe the symptoms and implications of genetic disease in the horse.
  • Understand the complexity of genetic diversity, breeds and registries.
  • Advantageously utilize available genetic tests to plan a breeding program.

This equine genetics course is 100% online, with weekly modules that can be fulfilled according to the student’s personal time schedule. Each week, a new subject in equine genetics will be approached, for a total of SIX modules. In each module, the student will find pages with suggested reading and instructions, two narrated slideshows, comprehension tests and activities. The subjects covered in this course will include basic Mendelian genetics, equine genome, coat color and patterns of white, parentage testing, genetic diseases, gait and other subjects of common interest.

Register for the Equine Genetics Course:

UF Horse Genetics Course Registration

Print and share the course flyer with others who might be interested:

Horse Genetics Course Flyer

Instructor Background:  Dr. Samantha Brooks

Samantha BrooksA lifelong horse woman, Dr. Samantha Brooks was diverted from vet school by a budding passion for equine research. Following a Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Biotechnology, Dr. Brooks remained at the University of Kentucky to study at the Gluck Equine Research Center. While there she earned her PhD in Veterinary Science, specializing in Equine Genetics under the mentorship of Dr. Ernest Bailey. Following her PhD she was awarded the Paul Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship to study the expression of inflammatory genes in horses affected with laminitis. At Cornell University she was responsible for the Equine Biology and Management course for six years. Her research program explores a variety of topics relevant to horse health ranging from gene expression studies to mapping of genetic disorders in the horse. Previously her research group discovered genetic mutations and markers for coat colors, height, sarcoid tumors and two neurological conditions.  Ongoing work targets variation in gait, susceptibility to infectious disease, metabolic syndrome and skeletal defects using genome wide association, genome re-sequencing and transcriptomics.

 

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Author: Jennifer Bearden – bearden@ufl.edu

Agriculture Agent Okaloosa County

Jennifer Bearden

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/06/18/horse-genetics-online-extension-course-begins-june-27/

June Cattle & Forage Management Reminders

June Cattle & Forage Management Reminders

UF/IFAS Beef Cattle & Forage Specialists, and County Extension Agents serving the Florida Panhandle worked to develop a basic management calendar for cattle producers.  The purpose of this calendar is to provide reminders for management techniques with similar timing to those used at the North Florida Research and Education Center’s Beef Research Unit, Marianna, Florida.   At the end of each month, Panhandle Ag e-News will share management reminders for the upcoming month. Links to useful publications with more information are also provided.

4 wheeler sprayerJune Management Reminders

Cattle Herd Management

  • Monitor horn fly population and use dust bags or spray as needed

  • Check mineral feeders

Pasture Management

  • Remove cattle from bahiagrass fields to be used for seed harvest in mid to late June

  • Begin grazing summer annuals when forage canopy is at least 20 inches tall and remove cattle after being grazed to 10 inch stubble height

    • Use limit grazing for 2-3 hours to acclimate cattle and stretch grazing days

 Pest Management

 

Use the following link to download the entire Cattle & Forage Management Annual Calendar:

Panhandle Ag Team Cattle & Forage Management Calendar

 

Developed by the Panhandle Agriculture Extension Livestock and Forage Team:

Doug Mayo, Cliff Lamb, Mark Mauldin, Ann Blount, Cheryl Mackowiak, Jose Dubeux, Jay Ferrell, Jennifer Bearden, NicolasDiLorenzo, Shep Eubanks, Jed Dillard, Mike Goodchild, Roy Carter, Henry Carter, John Atkins, and Kalyn Waters

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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/05/28/june-cattle-forage-management-reminders/

Pond Management Trainings Tuesday Evenings May 31st and June 7th

Pond Management Trainings Tuesday Evenings May 31st and June 7th

pondweeds 3Ponds can be a source of great enjoyment. However, properly managing them to meet your desired goals can be challenging. Panhandle Pond Management, a two part series being offered by UF/IFAS Extension, is designed to help pond owners/managers become more successful in reaching their goals. Specialists from campus will be onsite to share their expertise. Dr. Chuck Cichra, UF Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, will lead session 1 and Dr. Stephen Enloe, UF Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, will lead session 2.

Session 1 – May 31st Fish Management will focus on decisions that the pond owner can make that directly relate to the success and productivity of the fish population in a pond. Stocking, harvesting, feeding, aeration and other topics will be covered.

Session 2 – June 7th Aquatic Weed Management will involve weed identification, control options, and herbicide application techniques. If you have problem weeds bring samples for identification and control recommendations.

Panhandle Pond Management will be held at the Washington County Agricultural Center, 1424 Jackson Ave, Chipley FL. Each session will begin at 6:00pm; a meal will be served. To ensure we have enough food advanced registration is strongly encouraged. There is a $ 10 registration fee per session. To register call the Washington County Extension Office (850-638-6180) or use the links below for online registration. Session 2 attendees will receive a copy of Weed Control in Ponds a bound book sold through the IFAS bookstore.

Online Registration

Session 1 – https://goo.gl/Rwn9dk

Session 2 – https://goo.gl/zj58o6

 

Pond Mgmt Flyer current

 

 

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Author: Matthew Orwat – mjorwat@ufl.edu

Matthew J. Orwat started his career with UF / IFAS in 2011 and is the Horticulture Extension Agent for Washington County Florida. His goal is to provide educational programming to meet the diverse needs of and provide solutions for homeowners and small farmers with ornamental, turf, fruit and vegetable gardening objectives. Please feel free to contact him with any questions you may have.
http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/lng/about/

Matthew Orwat

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/05/24/pond-management-trainings-tuesday-evenings-may-31st-and-june-7th/

Pond Management Workshops May 31 and June 7

Pond Management Workshops May 31 and June 7

Managing a pond can be both rewarding and challenging. Photo Credit: Mark Mauldin

Managing a pond can be both rewarding and challenging.
Photo Credit: Mark Mauldin

Ponds can be a source of great enjoyment. However, properly managing them to meet your desired goals can be challenging. Panhandle Pond Management, a two part series being offered by UF/IFAS Extension, is designed to help pond owners/managers become more successful in reaching their goals. Specialists from campus will be onsite to share their expertise. Dr. Chuck Cichra, UF Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, will lead session 1 and Dr. Stephen Enloe, UF Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, will lead session 2.

Session 1 – May 31st Fish Management will focus on decisions that the pond owner can make that directly relate to the success and productivity of the fish population in a pond. Stocking, harvesting, feeding, aeration and other topics will be covered.

Session 2 – June 7th Aquatic Weed Management will involve weed identification, control options, and herbicide application techniques. If you have problem weeds bring samples for identification and control recommendations.

Panhandle Pond Management will be held at the Washington County Agricultural Center, 1424 Jackson Ave, Chipley FL. Each session will begin at 6:00pm; a meal will be served. To ensure we have enough food advanced registration is strongly encouraged. There is a $ 10 registration fee per session. To register call the Washington County Extension Office (850-638-6180) or use the links below for online registration. Session 2 attendees will receive a copy of Weed Control in Ponds a bound book sold through the IFAS bookstore.

Online Registration

Session 1 – https://goo.gl/Rwn9dk

Session 2 – https://goo.gl/zj58o6

 

Pond Mgmt Flyer current

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Author: Mark Mauldin – mdm83@ufl.edu

I am the Agriculture and Natural Resources agent in Washington County. My program areas include livestock and forage, row crops, and pond management.
http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu

Mark Mauldin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/05/22/pond-management-workshops-may-31-and-june-7/

Panhandle Pond Management Workshops May 31 & June 7

Panhandle Pond Management Workshops May 31 & June 7

As water temperatures increase aquatic weed growth increases. Be sure to monitor ponds closely and control weeds before the problem gets too large. Photo Credit: Mark Mauldin

Photo Credit: Mark Mauldin

Ponds can be a source of great enjoyment. However, properly managing them to meet your desired goals can be challenging. Panhandle Pond Management, a two part series being offered by UF/IFAS Extension, is designed to help pond owners/managers become more successful in reaching their goals. Specialists from campus will be onsite to share their expertise. Dr. Chuck Cichra, UF Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, will lead Session one, and Dr. Stephen Enloe, UF Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, will lead session two.

Session 1 – May 31st Fish Management

  • Focus – decisions the pond owner can make that directly relate to the success and productivity of the fish population in a pond. Stocking, harvesting, feeding, aeration, and other topics will be covered.

Session 2 – June 7th Aquatic Weed Management

  • Focus – weed identification, control options, and herbicide application techniques.

    Important!

    If you have problem weeds, bring samples to Session 2 for identification and control recommendations.

Panhandle Pond Management will be held at the Washington County Agricultural Center, 1424 Jackson Ave, Chipley FL. Each session will begin at 6:00pm central time and a meal will be served. To ensure we have enough food, advanced registration is strongly encouraged.

There is a $ 10 registration fee per session. To register, call the Washington County Extension Office (850-638-6180) or use the links below for online registration. Session 2 attendees will receive a copy of Weed Control in Ponds a bound book sold through the IFAS bookstore.

Online Registration

Download and print the program flyer:

Panhandle Pond Management Workshop Series Flyer

 

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Author: Mark Mauldin – mdm83@ufl.edu

I am the Agriculture and Natural Resources agent in Washington County. My program areas include livestock and forage, row crops, and pond management.
http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu

Mark Mauldin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/05/07/panhandle-pond-management-workshops-may-31-june-7/

Principles of Pasture Productivity Workshop Series June 9 or 14

Principles of Pasture Productivity Workshop Series June 9 or 14

Beef Cattle Winter Feeding Considerations will address how to make the most of many winter feeding systems, including cool season forages like the cows above are enjoying. Photo Credit: Mark Mauldin

Photo Credit: Mark Mauldin

Making the grass grow is not as simple or easy as many of us would like it to be. Even so, it is essential to successful livestock operations. Anyone who has grazing livestock needs to understand the fundamental principles of forage production. Whether you are providing forage for one horse or 1,000 cows the fundamental principles are the same. In an effort to help livestock producers gain a better understanding of these principles UF/IFAS Extension is presenting a four part series entitled Principles of Pasture Productivity. This series will examine some of the key principles of pasture management including;

  • Session 1 – Pasture Fertility

Focus – Soil testing, Fertilizer Selection & Application, Balancing Forage Quality, Quantity & Nutrient Demands

  • Session 2 – Grazing Management

Focus – Causes of Pasture Decline, Rotational Grazing Systems, Integration of Multiple Forage Species

  • Session 3 – Weed Control

FocusIntegrated Pest Management System, Basics of Pasture Herbicides, Efficient Herbicide Application

  • Session 4 – Forage Establishment & Variety Selection

Focus – Timing and techniques for establishing annual and perennial forages, Characteristics and site selection forage varieties

These topics will be presented in a practical, “how-to” style with consideration given to the varying sizes and management goals of local livestock operations.

Principles of Pasture Productivity will be held in two locations; The Washington County Agricultural Center in Chipley and the Calhoun County Public Library in Blountstown. Each session will begin at 6:30pm central time. Registration for the series includes any/all of the sessions at both locations. There is a $ 25 registration fee for the entire series or $ 10 per session. Light refreshments and printed program materials will be provided.

To register online use the following link:  

Register Online with Eventbrite

Or contact the location of choice for this series:

Washington County Extension Office 850-638-6180

Calhoun County Extension Office 850-674-8323

Chipley Dates

  • Session 1 – Tuesday, June 14th
  • Session 2 – Tuesday, July 12th
  • Session 3 – Tuesday, August 9th
  • Session 4 – Tuesday, September 13th

Washington County Agricultural Center, 1424 Jackson Ave. Chipley FL

Blountstown Dates

  • Session 1 – Thursday, June 9th
  • Session 2 – Thursday, July 21st
  • Session 3 – Thursday, August 25th
  • Session 4 – Thursday, September 15th

Calhoun County Public Library, 17731 N Pear St. Blountstown, FL

 

To view and print the program flyers select the link with the location of choice:   

 

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Author: Mark Mauldin – mdm83@ufl.edu

I am the Agriculture and Natural Resources agent in Washington County. My program areas include livestock and forage, row crops, and pond management.
http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu

Mark Mauldin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/05/07/principles-of-pasture-productivity-workshop-series-june-9-or-14/

June & July 2015 Weather Summary

Natianal Weather Service rainfall estimates for June 2105 in the Panhandle.

National Weather Service rainfall estimates for June 2105 in the Panhandle.

June and July were certainly hot and dry across much of the Panhandle.  The above graphic shows the June rainfall totals with isolated areas having less than two inches while along the coast, isolated areas had more than 10 inches fall in the month.  Most of the region, however received three to six inches.

National Weather Service estimates for rainfall in July 2015 across the Panhandle.

National Weather Service estimates for rainfall in July 2015 across the Panhandle.

July rainfall had even more variation than June, with large portions of several counties receiving less than three inches, while isolated locations along the coast received more than 15 inches.  Around the bend in North Central Florida,  Dixie and Levy Counties where drenched with more than 20 inches of rain in July.

FAWN Station Summary

UF/IFAS FAWN Weather Station Summary from January through July 2015.

UF/IFAS FAWN Weather Station Summary from January through July 2015.

The FAWN stations across the Panhandle also showed the rainfall variation that fell. All six stations were below historic averages through the first seven months of 2015.  The driest location, Carrabelle is more than six inches below average with only 24.3 inches collected for the year. The DeFuniak Springs Station remains as the wettest location for the year with 38.1 inches collected, and is also the closest to the historic average for the location.  The average rainfall total for all six stations was 33″, which is 2.6″ below historic averages.

Marianna FAWN Station Summary from January through July 2015.

Marianna FAWN Station Summary from January through July 2015.

All of the High Pressure that hung over the region in June and July brought scorching hot temperatures, but no triple digit readings at the 6ft. air level.  July was slightly hotter than June, but unfortunately the Soil Temperature sensor went bad in mid-July, so we don’t have records of how much the soil warmed up in July.  Based on air temperature readings it is safe to say that crops and fields were suffering in the heat of both June and July. For specific daily weather records, download:  2015 Jan-July Weather Summary

8-4-15 FL Drought MonitorThe latest Drought Monitor shows that there are large portions of the Panhandle experiencing moderate drought, or abnormally dry conditions.

For more information on Florida weather records for these months, download:

June Florida Weather Summary

July Florida Weather Summary

 

August through October Forecast

NOAA 3 Month Forecast for Aug-Oct 15The forecast for the next three months is for continued warmer than average temperatures through the end of October, but equal chances for below or above average rainfall.

El Niño Watch

Nearly all models predict El Niño to continue into the Northern Hemisphere through winter 2015-16, with many multi-model averages predicting a strong event at its peak strength.  At this time, the forecaster consensus is there is a greater than 90% chance that El Niño will continue through Northern Hemisphere winter 2015-16, and around an 80% chance it will last into early spring 2016.

Across the contiguous United States, temperature and precipitation impacts associated with El Niño are expected to remain minimal during the Northern Hemisphere summer and increase into the late fall and winter. El Niño will likely contribute to a below normal Atlantic hurricane season, and to above-normal hurricane seasons in both the central and eastern Pacific hurricane basins.  Climate Prediction Center

If their forecast holds true, it may be a good year to plant winter pastures and small grains, with higher than normal rainfall expected.  This forecast is more troublesome for vegetable planting in early spring, if conditions are similar to this past year.

 

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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Jackson County Extension Director, Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/08/08/june-july-2015-weather-summary/

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