Tag Archive: Survey

What is the USDA Survey You Got in the Mail in December?

What is the USDA Survey You Got in the Mail in December?

In addition to Christmas cards, farmers and ranchers in Florida received the National Agricultural Classification Survey (NACS) in December 2016’s mail.  This questionnaire will assist the U.S. Department of Agriculture to identify active farms and ranches in the United States, in preparation for the upcoming Ag Census.

The result of the NACS will determine who receives a census of agriculture questionnaire in December 2017. The census of agriculture is conducted every five years by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), and is the basis for uniform, comprehensive, and impartial agricultural data representing every county in the nation.

Through the census of agriculture, producers are able to establish the value and importance of agriculture, and influence decisions which will shape the future of the industry in this country. The reporting deadline for the NACS is January 30, 2016.

The census of agriculture is the leading source of data about domestic agriculture. Farm organizations, businesses, government decision-makers, commodity market analysts, news media, researchers, county agents and many others utilize census of agriculture information. It ensures every farm and ranch is represented.

The census of agriculture defines a farm as an entity which produces and sells, or could sell, $ 1,000 or more of agriculture products within a given calendar year. The NACS is required by law, as part of the census of agriculture. Under this same statute all information reported by individuals is protected.

For more information about Ag Classification Survey, and the 2017 Census of Agriculture, visit:

 

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Author: Les Harrison – harrisog@ufl.edu

Les Harrison is the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Director, Agriculture and Natural Resources. He works with small and medium sized producers in the Big Bend region of north Florida on a wide range of topics. He has a Master’s of Science Degree in Agricultural Economics from Auburn University and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Journalism from the University of Florida.

Les Harrison

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/14/what-is-the-usda-survey-you-got-in-the-mail-in-december/

2016 NASS Farm Land Rent and Labor Survey Summary

2016 NASS Farm Land Rent and Labor Survey Summary

Some of the most challenging conversations, in almost any relationship, are the ones about money.  This is certainly true as land owners and farmers, or managers and laborers negotiate for the year ahead. It can be pretty challenging to determine what is a fair price to rent a specific farm, or to set the wages for the skill sets of a specific employee, but, if you know the average rate, it does provide an unbiased place to start negotiations.  As with all statistics, just knowing the average is only part of the story, but at least it offers a reference point for both parties to begin the conversation.

Farm Land Rental Rates

The USDA’s National Agricultural Statistic Service (NASS) no longer provides annual summaries of land rental rates by county, but does compile a report on even years.  Unfortunately their survey summary does not offer the range of rates paid, but does offer county, regional, or state averages that provide an unbiased place to begin negotiations. There are a number of factors that influence the rental value of farm land.  Certainly farm size, crop history, soil type, and location influence lease rates.  A large, 300 acre field would be more attractive to rent than 15 acres, or a farm next door more valuable than an operation 10 miles away.  The amount of Farm Bill Base Acreage on the land also plays a role in setting the value of crop land rental rates.

The following is a summary of the information NASS provides on average land rental rates.  Table 1 provides the average rate for renting non-irrigated, or dryland crop land by county.  The average for the whole Panhandle region in 2016 was $ 64.50 per acre. There was certainly variation from county to county, with a high of $ 92.50/acre in Santa Rosa to a low $ 41/acre in Holmes County.

Table 1. Average Dryland crop rental rates reported by USDA NASS.

Since there are not as many irrigated farms, NASS reports their survey results by region, instead of by county.  Irrigated crop land is generally more productive and certainly more consistent, so the lease rates are generally much higher per acre. Table 2 shows the variation in irrigated farm lease rates in the tri-states region, with an average of $ 180/acre for the Southeast.

Table 2. Average irrigated crop land rental rates reported by USDA NASS.

Pasture rental rates were also surveyed.  Pasture lease rates are considerably lower than crop land, because livestock generate a much lower return per acre.  Table 3 illustrates the range of average pasture rent from $ 23.50/acre in Walton County to $ 40/acre in Escambia County.  The average pasture rent for the entire Panhandle was $ 34.50/acre in 2016.

Table 3 Average pasture rental rates reported by USDA NASS.

Farm Labor Wages

The other challenge that farmers and ranchers face is knowing what is a fair rate to pay their hired labor.  NASS only reports farm workers in general categories, so the averages provided in Table 4 may not fit specialized categories of workers.  NASS does not provide a regional or by county hired worker wage report, so this information came from across the state of Florida.

Table 4 Florida average farm worker wages reported by USDA NASS.

The USDA’s National Agricultural Statistic Services offers a wide range of additional information based on annual surveys and the Ag Census every five years.  To look at the information provided in this article, and other information from their surveys go to:  http://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/

 

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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Lead Editor for Panhandle Ag e-news – Jackson County Extension Director – Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/01/07/2016-nass-farm-land-rent-and-labor-survey-summary/

UF Survey Shows Most Floridians Want to Know More about Genetically Modified Foods

Fewer than half of Florida consumers survey by the UF PIE Centersay they would purchase genetically modied food or clothing, even if it cost less or was their favorite food.

Fewer than half of 500 Florida consumers surveyed say they would purchase genetically modied food or clothing, even if it cost less or was their favorite food.  Source: UF/IFAS Center for Public Issues Education.

While almost half of Floridians acknowledge buying genetically modified foods, a recent survey by the Center for Public Issues Education in Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Florida reveals that most people want to know much more about those foods. “The study shows that Floridians believe they don’t know much about genetically modified foods and their benefits,” said Joy Rumble, assistant professor in agricultural education and communication at the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. “Many people are favorable to supporting research, and they think it’s essential that government support it. Floridians see a place for GM foods, but they do have hesitations.”

The PIE Center surveyed 500 Floridians on their perceptions of genetically modified foods. Respondents were largely unsure about the potential benefits of genetically modified food, with more than 40 percent neither agreeing nor disagreeing that food technology such as GMOs allows people to live longer or better lives.

Source: Center for Public Issues Education

A recent survey of 500 Florida consumers shows that only 33% considered genetically modified foods as safe.  Source: Center for Public Issues Education

However, there is a great potential to educate Floridians about the topic, as 64 percent of respondents indicated that they would like to learn more about genetically modified foods. Only 22 percent of Floridians agreed or strongly agreed that they received information about genetically modified food from a scientist, but 59 percent of respondents would like to learn more from universities.  “This is a great opportunity not only for UF but also for other educational institutions across the country to take the lead in educating the general public about genetically modified foods,” Rumble said.

In addition, many Floridians were favorable toward supporting research, with 42 percent agreeing that studies about genetically modified food are essential for improving the quality of life. Almost half agreed that the federal government should support research on genetically modified food. “The research results show opportunities to continue to educate and communicate with consumers about the safety of genetically modified food,” Rumble said. “Still, there is some negative perception about these foods out there.” For example, fewer than half of Florida’s residents say they would purchase genetically modified food or clothing, even if it cost less or was their favorite food. But, more than 40 percent of Floridians agreed or strongly agreed they have purchased genetically modified food in the past, while only 27 percent of Floridians believe they currently purchase genetically modified food.

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Author: admin – webmaster@ifas.ufl.edu

admin

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/07/02/uf-survey-shows-most-floridians-want-to-know-more-about-genetically-modified-foods/

Researchers Assessing Smutgrass Damage to Pastures with Survey

A pasture infested with smutgrass, which is not grazed by livestock and competes with improved forage grasses.

A pasture infested with smutgrass, which is not grazed by livestock, competes with improved forage grasses.

University of Florida Researchers are attempting to gather information on smutgrass in Florida.  This effort is part of a grant they received from USDA-NIFA.  This survey is being conducted to provide a basic understanding of the current status of smutgrass infestations, current management methods, and approximate economic impact on grazing lands in Florida.

The information collected from this survey will be used to conduct further research on integrated management strategies for smutgrass in perennial grass pastures.  We estimate that this survey should require less than 15 minutes to complete.  All answers are anonymous and we will make no attempt to identify respondents.

Complete the survey online:
Online Livestock Producer Smutgrass Survey

or download, print and return by fax or mail:

Printed Livestock Producer Smutgrass Survey

Thank you!

Brent Sellers, Ph.D.
Extension Weed Specialist
Range Cattle REC & Dept of Agronomy

 

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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Jackson County Extension Director, Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/09/19/researchers-assessing-smutgrass-damage-to-pastures-with-survey/

Record Year for NOAA Shark Survey in North Carolina

Record Year for NOAA Shark Survey in North Carolina

Most of us remember the string of shark attacks that occurred this past summer in North Carolina; as a matter of fact, according to the International Shark Attack File, it was a record year for that region. Since 2001 there have been 34 shark attacks in North Carolina ranging from 1-5 per year (average 2.4 attacks / year); this year there were 8 attacks. Why the increase?

Reviewing the trend data we can see that the human population has increased, attendance at local beaches has increased, the number of tourists to our beaches has increased, and the shark attacks have also increased. But could the actual number of sharks be increasing as well? A recent report suggest… maybe.

Pregnant Bull Shark (Carcharhinus leucas) cruses sandy seafloor. Credit Florida Sea Grant Stock Photo

Pregnant Bull Shark (Carcharhinus leucas) cruses sandy seafloor. Credit Florida Sea Grant Stock Photo

Since 1986 NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center has been capturing and logging sharks along the southeast coast of the United States. This year’s survey logged 2,835 sharks between North Carolina and Florida; most were Sandbar’s, Atlantic Sharpnose, Dusky, and Tiger sharks. This is an increase from 1,831 in 2012 and higher than any year since the surveys began.

 

Are they getting better at catching shark? Maybe… but scientific surveys require that the team use the same protocol each year when conducting such surveys, suggesting that there are in fact more sharks out there. If this is so, why are there more sharks?

 

Well you first have to confirm that this is in fact the case – sharks are in fact increasing. But scientists can begin looking at data that could explain it. Typically you would begin with their food supply and predation. Though we now know that increase in food supply does not always equate to an increase in predators, it is data that should be reviewed. And what about predators of sharks? Which is typically us.

 

A review of the NOAA shark landing data indicates that 5 of the 9 shark categories have been closed as of June 22, 2015 because they have landed a significant percentage of their allowed quota for the year. This equates to good fishing… which could mean more sharks. Discussing with local divers in the Pensacola area, they believe they are seeing more sharks – and the increase seems to be closer inshore. It is an El Nino year, and environmental conditions change during these seasons.  It is known that environmental changes will certainly trigger changes in fishery numbers and distribution.

 

As the scientific process works itself out, we will learn more about what is occurring with sharks in U.S. waters. In our state the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission protects 25 species of sharks. Anglers are allowed one non-protected species and no more than 2 per vessel. (Learn More). More should be known once the 2015 season comes to an end. Why shark numbers in North Carolina have increased is not understood at this time but monitoring will continue.

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Author: Rick O’Connor – roc1@ufl.edu

Sea Grant Extension Agent in Escambia County

Rick O’Connor

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/09/19/record-year-for-noaa-shark-survey-in-north-carolina/

2014 NASS Farm Land Rent & Labor Survey Summary

2014 NASS Farm Land Rent & Labor Survey Summary

Irrigated farm land rented for an average of $   per acre in the tri-states region in 2014

The annual USDA BASS Survey indicated that irrigated farm land rented for an average of $ 132 per acre in the tri-states region in 2014, which was $ 22/acre less than what was reported for 2013.

It is the time of year when land owners and farmers negotiate lease agreements for renting farm land. One of the toughest parts of negotiation is having a handle on what is a fair price.  The USDA National Agricultural Statistic Service (NASS) does an annual survey to estimate rental rates for a specific region.  The survey summary does not provide the range of rates paid, but does provide annual county average rates.  Not every county is surveyed each year, so it is helpful to look at the results from neighboring counties as well.

There are a number of factors that influence the rental value of farm land.  Certainly farm size, crop history, soil type, and location influence lease rates.  A large, 300 acre field would be more attractive to rent than 15 acres, or a farm next door more valuable than an operation 10 miles away.  While the NASS Survey Report only provides average prices, it does offer an unbiased place to start the negotiations.

The new Farm Bill programs, and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) Base Acreage associated with each farm, may also affect land rental value in the years ahead.  For example a farm with a large percentage of either peanut or generic (formerly cotton) base will be more attractive for peanut farming than land without base acreage that can be utilized with the new peanut program.

14 Non-irriagted rent

Table 1 Data provided by National Agricultural Statistics Service

Non-irrigted or dryland farm acres are commonly rented or leased in Northwest Florida.  Table 1 above shows the variation of average dryland farm rent by county, which ranged from $ 32/acre in Walton County to $ 88/acre in Santa Rosa and Escambia Counties.  Some counties have enough survey results to report individually, while others are grouped in a category called “other counties”.   The average rental rate for non-irrigated crop land in the Panhandle regions was $ 57/acre in 2014.

Table 2.  Data provided by National Agricultural Statistics Service

Table 2. Data provided by National Agricultural Statistics Service

Since there are not as many irrigated farms, NASS reports their survey results by region, instead of by county.  Irrigated crop land is generally more productive and certainly more consistent, so the lease rates are generally much higher per acre. Table 2 shows the variation in irrigated farm lease rates in the tri-states region, with an average of $ 132/acre for the area.

Table 3.  Data provided by National Agricultural Statistics Service

Table 3. Data provided by National Agricultural Statistics Service

Pasture lease rates are considerably lower than crop land, because livestock generate a much lower return per acre.  Table 3 illustrates the range of pasture rent from $ 23/acre in Holmes County to $ 36/acre in Washington County.  The average pasture rent for the Panhandle was $ 29.50/acre in 2014.

14 Avg Labor

Table 4. Data provided by National Agricultural Statistics Service

The other challenge that farmers and ranchers face is knowing what is a fair rate to pay their hired labor.  NASS only reports farm workers in general categories, so the averages provided in Table 4 may not fit specialized categories of workers.  NASS does not provide a regional or by county hired worker wage report, so this information came from across the state of Florida.

The USDA’s National Agricultural Statistic Services offers a wide range of additional information.  To look at the information provided in this article and other information from their surveys go to:  http://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/NASS Logo

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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Jackson County Extension Director, Livestock & Forages Agent. My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/01/31/2014-nass-farm-land-rent-labor-survey-summary/

2013 NASS Farm Land Rent Survey Summary

2013 NASS Farm Land Rent Survey Summary

13 Dryland Lease Chart

Table 1

It is the time of year when land owners and farmers negotiate lease agreements for the crop year ahead.  One of the toughest parts of negotiation is having a handle on what is a fair price.  The USDA National Agricultural Statistic Service (NASS) does an annual survey to estimate average prices for a specific region.  The survey summary does not offer a range from their results, but an annual average is provided. Certainly farm size, soil type, and location influence lease rates.  A large, 300 acre field would be more attractive to rent than 15 acres, and would generally be more valuable to rent.  While the NASS Survey Report only provides average prices, it does offer an unbiased place to start negotiations.

Non-irrigted or dryland farm acres are commonly rented or leased in Northwest Florida.  Table 1 above shows the variation of average dryland farm rent by county, which ranged from $ 39/acre in Holmes County to $ 84/acre in Escambia.  Some counties have enough survey results to report individually, while others are grouped in a category called “other counties”.   The average rental rate for non-irrigated crop land in the Panhandle was $ 59/acre in 2013.

Table 2

Table 2

Since there are not as many irrigated farms, NASS reports their survey results by region, instead of by county.  Irrigated crop land is generally more productive and certainly more consistent, so the lease rates are generally much higher per acre. Table 2 shows the variation in irrigated farm lease rates in the tri-states region, with an average of $ 154/acre for the area.

Table 3

Table 3

Pasture lease rates are considerably lower than crop land.  Mainly because livestock generate a much lower return per acre.  Table 3 illustrates the range of pasture rent from $ 24/acre in Walton County to $ 38/acre in Santa Rosa.  The average pasture rent for the Panhandle was $ 29/acre in 2013.

Table 4

Table 4

The other challenge that farmers and ranchers face is knowing what is a fair rate to pay their hired labor.  NASS only reports farm workers in general categories, so the averages provided in Table 4 may not fit specialized categories of workers.  NASS does not provide a regional or by county hired worker wage report, so this information came from across the state of Florida.

The USDA’s National Agricultural Statistic Services offers a wide range of additional information.  To look at the information provided in this article and other information from their surveys go to:  http://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/

NASS Logo

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Author: Doug Mayo – demayo@ufl.edu

Jackson County Extension Director, & Livestock & Forages Agent

My true expertise is with beef cattle and pasture management, but I can assist with information on other livestock species, as well as recreational fish ponds.
http://jackson.ifas.ufl.edu

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/01/03/2013-nass-farm-land-rent-survey-summary/

Take survey to identify Gulf research needs

 

Gulf of Mexico Research Plan Interim Report

You can provide input to numerous groups around the Gulf of Mexico that are developing regional science and restoration plans or funding Gulf research through a single survey.

This survey is part of an update to the Gulf of Mexico Research Plan (GMRP). This project assists the Gulf of Mexico research community in identifying research and related priorities and learning if priorities shifted during the past six years.

Multiple groups already have used input collected through previous GMRP efforts to identify and fund research, and the 2013 survey results will be distributed widely as a service to the research community. The results of this survey will be shared with the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI), NOAA Restore Act Science Program, National Academy of Science’s Gulf of Mexico Program, Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council and other groups. The GMRP efforts are partially sponsored by NOAA and the four Gulf of Mexico Sea Grant college programs.

Responses will be anonymous, and it will take less than 15 minutes to complete this critical survey. The survey will close on Dec. 13, so complete it today.

For more information contact Steve Sempier, Sea Grant Gulf of Mexico research planning coordinator.

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Author: Scott Jackson – lsj@ufl.edu

UF/IFAS Leon County Extension
Regional Specialized Agent for Agriculture and Technology, Extension Agent III

http://leon.ifas.ufl.edu

Scott Jackson

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2013/12/02/take-survey-to-identify-gulf-research-needs/

2012 NASS Survey Summary of Farm Lease Rates

Table 1. USDA NASS survey summary of non-irrigated crop land rent in Northwest Florida.

One of the challenges for both land owners and farmers is making farm land rental agreements which are fair for both parties.  Farm leases are private agreements between farmers and land owners, so very little information is available to assist with determining fair market value.  Every lease is also different:  some include hunting rights, some do not; and some leases are for an entire farm which includes land that is not suitable for crops or grazing, while others target only the acres being used for production.  Certainly larger tracts have more value to farmers than smaller tracts.  Location, soil type and amount of available irrigation also affect the value of a potential farm lease.

The challenge is finding a starting place for negations.  The USDA National Agriculture Statistic Service (NASS) does an annual survey of farm lease rates each summer.  Table 1 above provides the average rental rate per acre of dryland or non-irrigated crop land reported by county for the past few years.  Since there are much fewer irrigated farms, NASS reports irrigated acres only for the region instead of individual counties in Florida.  Table 2 below shows the average lease rate per acre for irrigated farm leases in the Tri-state area by region.  Pasture rental rates are usually lower per acre than crop land.  Table 3 below shows the results of the NASS survey of pasture land rental by county.

USDA NASS has other data available, if you would like to compare other economic figures and statistics, go to http://quickstats.nass.usda.gov.

 

Table 2. USDA NASS survey summary of irrigated crop land by region.

Table 3. USDA NASS survey summary of pasture rent in NW Florida.

Doug Mayo

Permanent link to this article: http://franklin.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2012/11/30/2012-nass-survey-summary-of-farm-lease-rates/